Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Debt: The First 5,000 Years de David Graeber
Carregando...

Debt: The First 5,000 Years (original: 2011; edição: 2011)

de David Graeber

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,946586,489 (4.17)55
Economic history states that money replaced a bartering system, yet there isn't any evidence to support this axiom. Anthropologist Graeber presents a stunning reversal of this conventional wisdom. For more than 5000 years, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods. Since the beginning of the agrarian empires, humans have been divided into debtors and creditors. Through time, virtual credit money was replaced by gold and the system as a whole went into decline. This fascinating history is told for the first time.… (mais)
Membro:iamjonlarson
Título:Debt: The First 5,000 Years
Autores:David Graeber
Informação:Melville House (2011), Edition: 0, Hardcover, 544 pages
Coleções:Read Aloud, Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read, 5-skill-building, 4-personal-change, 6-cultural-awareness, finance, not-owned, non-fiction, goodreads

Detalhes da Obra

Debt: The First 5,000 Years de David Graeber (2011)

  1. 40
    O Capital no Século XXI de Thomas Piketty (waitingtoderail)
  2. 10
    The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve de G. Edward Griffin (fulner)
    fulner: Is debt a necessity that has helped advance civilization, or a conspiracy to keep the poor man down, the truth may lie somewhere between
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 55 menções

Inglês (57)  Alemão (1)  Todos os idiomas (58)
Mostrando 1-5 de 58 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
how we derived our ideas about debt, money, economy--role of violence and military in creating and maintaining system
  ritaer | Aug 29, 2021 |
I had a difficult time slogging through Debt. It shares a similar problem with Niall Fergeson's completely unreadable "the Ascent of Money:" it mixes in the author's politics and political leanings with history to give everything this weird political sheen (in this case left to Fergeson's right.) In this case, Graeber's book covers more facts than political lecturing but it's bumped several stars for being overt.

However, Debt is a worthy read for anyone interested in the span of history from early Sumerian - Middle Ages. The sections on Babylonian debt-based society and the Roman slave society are especially strong; the entire chapter on the Axial Age and the move to coinage over debt to pay for mercenaries is good and solid read full of meaty "stuff." The effect of the fall of the Roman Empire on the coinage left in circulation and how that contributed to the Dark Ages while the smaller communities returned to earlier debt and borrow strategies is also good. I liked the breakdown on how debt goes back to wife trading and wife purchasing with cows as demonstrated in Africa and moving from that to a more generalized market -- the first people to ever price physical objects were, of course, thieves who needed to sell them for other things. And the most precious commodity is a human being.

Debt falls down in the Islam chapter and the China chapter, both which feel thin and full of conjecture. China has a big piece to play in the Cortez-dumping-silver-on-the-European-economy section but otherwise, it's glossed over. The chapter on the rise of Islam and the role it plays is dry and nearly unreadable.

What I want to say about Debt is to skip the boring parts and read the interesting ones. Skipping to halfway through the book to the Axial Age chapter is a good strategy. Skip everything after the Middle Ages -- Graeber hardly has interest in things like 18th century stock bubbles (although mentioned) and the rise of the East India Company. Saying, "Yeah this is a great book on ROME!" is good. Saying, "This is a great book on the history of monetary policy!" is not. It's an okay introduction to the genesis of debt, a great discussion about ancient and near-ancient monetary policy, and a fairly terrible one on the modern day.

Not a waste of time, but not 5 stars either. A good 3.5 star book. ( )
  multiplexer | Jun 20, 2021 |
This was a fabulous book, contained all kinds of new information. Really is about Debt, not Money. Important difference. It's definitely worth a read if you are into economic theory. ( )
  064 | Dec 25, 2020 |
This book is a wild ride. It's in my 2016 reread queue which is tentative high praise. I need to check the sources and read it again but nevertheless it's highly entertaining and surely subversive. Incidentally it has one of the best surveys of peasant life through history that I've read since I listened to the lectures 'The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World' by Robert Garland. A great summer read in any event. ( )
  skroah | Dec 14, 2020 |
A book that set out to challenge the reader's preconceptions; it certainly ended up being extremely thought-provoking. I can't remember the last time I argued along with a book so much. Uncharitably, the book proceeded from speculation (when dealing with ancient history) to polemic (when nearing the current day) as Graeber sharpens his thesis into a fierce critique of capitalism itself. Despite that, the book is genuinely intriguing and has a lot of valuable insight derived by taking an anthropological approach to the study of debt, rather than the more traditional economic approach. Worth reading for anyone interested in the fascinating topic of debt — but I'd recommend pairing it with another book looking at the same topic from a different point of view. ( )
  dhmontgomery | Dec 13, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 58 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
David Graeberautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Freundl, HansTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gardner, GroverNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gebauer, StephanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schäfer, UrselTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
debt
noun 1 a sum of money owed. 2 the state of owing money. 3 a feeling of gratitude for a favour or service.
--Oxford English Dictionary
If you owe the bank a hundred thousand dollars, the bank owns you. If you owe the bank a hundred million dollars, you own the bank. --American Proverb
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Two years ago, by a series of strange coincidences, I found myself attending a garden party at Westminster Abbey.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It's money that had made it possible for us to imagine ourselves in the way economists encourage us to do: as a collection of individuals and nations whose main business is swapping things.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC
Economic history states that money replaced a bartering system, yet there isn't any evidence to support this axiom. Anthropologist Graeber presents a stunning reversal of this conventional wisdom. For more than 5000 years, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods. Since the beginning of the agrarian empires, humans have been divided into debtors and creditors. Through time, virtual credit money was replaced by gold and the system as a whole went into decline. This fascinating history is told for the first time.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Gêneros

Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

332 — Social Sciences Economics Finance

Classificação da Biblioteca do Congresso dos E.U.A. (LCC)

Avaliação

Média: (4.17)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 8
2.5 2
3 38
3.5 10
4 121
4.5 17
5 113

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 162,436,578 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível