Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Hand That First Held Mine

de Maggie O'Farrell

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9896616,256 (3.87)75
A spell-binding novel of two women connected across fifty years by art, love, betrayals, secrets, and motherhood.
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 75 menções

Inglês (62)  Holandês (2)  Espanhol (1)  Catalão (1)  Todos os idiomas (66)
Mostrando 1-5 de 66 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
(17) I really enjoyed this - easy reading that sucks you right in. Elina has lost her memory surrounding the birth of her baby son. She wakes up and he is in a crib in her room and not in her womb and she subsequently spends the next few weeks in a fog of sleeplessness, crying, wet nappies, and vague fear and confusion. Her boyfriend, Ted, is not much help in that fatherhood has seemed to have awoken some lost memories of his own early years. Then we are juxtapositioned with a seemingly unrelated story of a country girl who moves to London, falls in love, and becomes a reporter - how in the world could these 2 stories relate? But they do. We don't find out how until quite late in an otherwise engrossing narrative.

O'Farrell's writing is effortless. Her characterizations are lovely and the contextual detail she adds is spot on and almost haunting in its poignancy and symbolism. The violets, cigarettes, the veiny leaves of a plane tree, the phonics of baby talk. I was mesmerized at times. The sadness and the absolute erasure of Lexie's life was heartbreaking.

So as the blurb says - its about love, motherhood (OMG, Lexie's thoughts of what she would miss in the water - absolutely soul-destroying) fatherhood. It's about forgetting and remembering. The more I write, the more I feel perhaps I should up my star rating, but in the main - I think the subject matter tilts a bit toward the woman's book club crowd with less thematic relevance and gravity to the larger world - but maybe I am selling it short. I dunno - anyway, I will definitely read this author again. ( )
1 vote jhowell | Apr 2, 2021 |
I have not had a book effect me like this one does in quite some time. Sob worthy to the nth degree. O'Farrell tells the story using two distinct timelines: Lexie in the 1950-70s in Soho and Elina and Ted in the early 2000s in London. I knew as I read that at some point these two timelines would have to intersect or connect in some way. And so I was consumed by trying to figure out what the connection was and then the slow reveal just knocked me for a loop. I thought I knew what it was going to be but no, not even close. On the other hand, a more perceptive reader may have figured it out. The characters were deftly drawn and the main theme is the question of how far back in time can we remember actual incidents from our past? Is it four years old? Three? Two? Just a brilliant novel, my fourth of O'Farrell's and solidly places Her among my favorite authors. ( )
  brenzi | Feb 11, 2021 |
I decided to end the year with another novel by someone who has become one of my favourite contemporary writers. In this book, which won the 2010 Costa Book Award, there are two narratives, set over 50 years apart, which eventually do connect.

In the mid-1950s, free-spirited Lexie Sinclair leaves her family home in Devon and moves to London where Innes Kent, an art dealer, art critic, and art magazine editor, introduces her to the arts scene in post-war Soho and guides her into a career as an art journalist. Later Lexie gives birth to a son and raises him as a single mother, while continuing to pursue her career.

In contemporary times, Elina Vilkuna, a painter, is recovering from the difficult birth of her first child and navigating the first months of motherhood. For her partner Ted, Elina’s near-death during delivery has triggered memories of his childhood. He remembers nothing before he was about nine, but now starts to have flashbacks of suppressed memories which leave him increasingly confused.

The novel’s portrayal of motherhood is outstanding. The author captures the women’s intense love for their children alongside their deep longing for independence and creativity. The exhaustion, anxieties, and joys of motherhood experienced by Lexie and Elina will resonate with all mothers. Parenting also challenges relationships, and Elina and Ted struggle to return to the relationship they had before the arrival of their son.

An aspect of the novel which I found most interesting is the development of Lexie. In the beginning, she seems immature and selfish but she slowly grows into a strong, capable, confident, independent woman. Life is not easy for her; she is abandoned in more than one way, yet she perseveres. She pays little heed to social norms; certainly her decision to raise a child as an unmarried woman in the 1950s is unorthodox. Being the only female staff writer for a newspaper presents challenges but ones she manages without fanfare. I love dynamic characters that change in a convincing, credible way.

The book begins slowly; it is not until the end of the first part – almost exactly midway through the novel – that a pivotal event occurs that really propels Lexie’s story. In the other narrative, Elina begins to feel well again and Ted begins reconstructing more and more memories. It becomes obvious that the two stories will connect and that, as in many of O’Farrell’s novels, secrets and lies will be shown to affect future generations.

More than once, the author directly addresses the reader but in such a way that the comments are not intrusive. For example, the novel opens with this paragraph: “Listen. The trees in this story are stirring, trembling, readjusting themselves. A breeze is coming in gusts off the sea, and it is almost as if the trees know, in their restlessness, in their head-tossing impatience, that something is about to happen.” Foreshadowing is very explicit: there are sentences like “She has no idea that she will die young, that she does not have as much time as she thinks” and “She doesn’t know that this will never happen.” Even before the connection between the two stories is obvious, the author describes Ted sitting “at the table where Lexie’s desk used to be.”

I would not say this is O’Farrell’s best book – that honour belongs to Hamnet and Judith – but this is still a worthwhile read.

Note: Please check out my reader's blog (https://schatjesshelves.blogspot.com/) and follow me on Twitter (@DCYakabuski). ( )
  Schatje | Dec 28, 2020 |
Niet genoeg geduld gehad met deze O'Farrell? Of staan de verhaallijnen te lang te los van mekaar? Te veel in de wolken over haar latere boeken?
Schitterende passage: Lexie leeft in London met Innes en tuimelt stapsgewijs terug in de tijd tot in de tuin van haar ouderlijk huis.
Desalniettemin: Maggie heeft een getalenteerde pen en verbeelding, zowel wat stijl als wat romanconstructie betreft.
https://www.standaard.be/cnt/3k3557i2 ( )
  Baukis | Sep 16, 2020 |
This is the second novel I've read by Maggie O'Farrell. I loved The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox and this one was just as good. ( )
  baruthcook | Aug 26, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 66 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
And we forget because we must. - Matthew Arnold
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
for IZ
for SS
for WD
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Listen. The trees in this story are stirring, trembling, readjusting themselves.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A spell-binding novel of two women connected across fifty years by art, love, betrayals, secrets, and motherhood.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.87)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 13
2.5 7
3 60
3.5 24
4 118
4.5 25
5 62

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,534,371 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível