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Joan of Arc de Mark Twain
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Joan of Arc (original: 1896; edição: 1989)

de Mark Twain

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1,612258,019 (4.01)39
Very few people know that Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) wrote a major work on Joan of Arc. Still fewer know that he considered it not only his most important but also his best work. He spent twelve years in research and many months in France doing archival work, and then made several attempts until he felt he finally had the story he wanted to tell. He reached his conclusion about Joan's unique place in history only after studying in detail accounts written by both sides, the French and the English. This is a fascinating and remarkably accurate biography of the life and mission of Joan of Arc told by one of this country's greatest storytellers.… (mais)
Membro:StDominicChurch
Título:Joan of Arc
Autores:Mark Twain
Informação:Ignatius Press (1989), Edition: 1st, Paperback, 455 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Saints, Fiction, Joan of Arc

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Joan of Arc de Mark Twain (1896)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 25 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Words can't even begin to describe this book. It is one you have to read yourself, but it is well worth a read. I don't know how anyone could read this book and not be an awe of Joan of Arc. I can't say it enough, it is one you have to read for yourself. ( )
  AshRaye | Dec 18, 2020 |
She was an unschooled country peasant that lifted the fortunes of her uncrowned King and nation on her shoulders, but when she needed them was abandoned. Joan of Arc stands alone among Mark Twain’s bibliography as a historical novel about the one person in history he admires above all others.

Twain’s account of Joan of Arc’s life is written from the perspective of a fictional version of Joan’s former secretary and page Sieur Louis de Conte written at the end of his life to his great-nephews and nieces. The first part of the book focuses on her life in the village of Domremy, essentially where all but the last two years of her life occurred, and the beginning of her visions then quest to fulfill the commission she received. The second part is her successful meeting with the King, formal acknowledgement of the Church that she wasn’t a witch, then her year-long military campaign—with numerous breaks due to political interference and foot dragging by Charles VII—that saw her mission completed, and finally her capture by the Burgundians. The final part of the book was of her year in captivity and the long grueling “legal” process that the English-paid French clergy put her through to murder her as a heretic. The final chapter is of Conte giving a brief account of the feckless Charles VII waiting over two decades to Rehabilitate his benefactor after allowing her to be murdered by not paying her ransom all those years before.

This was a labor of love for Twain to write and it was easy to tell given how professionally researched it was in every detail. While many 20th-Century critics and other Twain admirers don’t like this book because it’s not “classic” Twain because of his praise of Joan given that she’s French, Catholic, and a martyr when he disliked or hated all three; they didn’t seem to understand his hero worship of this teenage girl who put a nation on her shoulders to resurrect its existence. Yet, while this was a straight historical novel there are touches of Twain especially in Conte’s “relating” the adventures of the Domremy boys when they were not in Joan’s presence, especially Paladin.

Joan of Arc is not the typical Mark Twain work, but that doesn’t mean one can not appreciate it for well, if not professionally, researched historical novel that it is. ( )
  mattries37315 | Jun 17, 2020 |
This was an appealing, but flawed in style, historical novel denoting the history of Joan of Arc. There was intrigue, danger, excitement, and interesting events happening here. Yet, the writing was stiff and forced in this one, much more so than in other Twain works. Nonetheless, I do believe it's worth reading, for there are pearls in here to gander at.

3.25 stars. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Mar 29, 2020 |
I read this book during college in the ‘90s after finding it in the stacks on a search for a forgotten topic. Having been raised Catholic, I knew all the major saints stories including Joan of Arc who I considered one of the cool ones. Most of the stories I read came from saint’s cards or booklets from the church. When I saw Twain’s book, I felt shock at his writing her story and, along with a large dictionary, read the book in a couple of days.

I recently reread the book to determine if my impressions of it would remain. While it’s not a perfect book, his scholarship and details create images of the places and people that evoke an emotional response. His descriptions of how she understands her voices helps to understand her. It also helps to understand how those voices drove her to such an incredible leadership position at that time and in that place. Twain keeps her fury through the book, which is remarkable considering when he was writing.

I wondered why Twain wrote this book. What compelled him to write a somber book about a furious Catholic girl who died as a heretic? To me, in the pre-Internet era, Twain’s obsession with Joan of Arc was a big riddle. While he had published two books set in midieval Europe, this book differed considerably in tone and topic. Twain wrote it as personal recollections sourced from the trial transcripts and a history of France. I read the story through my feminist lenses as a strong, resolute woman who never backs down even in the face of an incredibly painful and public death.

In a strange coincidence, a local call-in radio show was hosting a Twain scholar not too long after I read the book. He said he did not expect a question about that book. I didn’t expect him to tell me that Twain viewed Joan differently than I did. In Twain’s narrative, Joan’s virtue, her youth and subsequent purity, appealed to Twain and in later years he would rail against those who portrayed her as a stout, almost masculine figure. He said that Twain was in a period in which he increasingly valued innocence and came to saw it embodied in young women.

I still find the book remarkable no matter the intent of the author. We see our historical “heroes” as we want to see them. Twain valued her for her purity in the face of unrelenting suffering. I value her for her integrity and incredible courage. It’s a remarkable book. ( )
  tafergus70 | Apr 2, 2019 |
I think ol' man Sawyer got in a ways over his head with this one, but I'll give him five stars anyway just for having the gumption to try it. ( )
  NathanielPoe | Mar 6, 2019 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Twain, Markautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Conte, Louis dePseudonymautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Pyle, HowardIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Very few people know that Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) wrote a major work on Joan of Arc. Still fewer know that he considered it not only his most important but also his best work. He spent twelve years in research and many months in France doing archival work, and then made several attempts until he felt he finally had the story he wanted to tell. He reached his conclusion about Joan's unique place in history only after studying in detail accounts written by both sides, the French and the English. This is a fascinating and remarkably accurate biography of the life and mission of Joan of Arc told by one of this country's greatest storytellers.

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