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Ark de Stephen Baxter
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Ark (edição: 2010)

de Stephen Baxter

Séries: Flood (2)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5882130,224 (3.6)32
It's the year 2041. The oceans have risen rapidly, and soon the entire planet will be submerged. But hope has arisen with the discovery of another life-sustaining planet light-year away. Only a small number will be able to make the journey-- and the competition for survival can kill human compassion.… (mais)
Membro:Cataloger623
Título:Ark
Autores:Stephen Baxter
Informação:Roc (2010), Kindle Edition, 468 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Lidos mas não possuídos
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Ark de Stephen Baxter

  1. 10
    Gardens of the Sun de Paul McAuley (AlanPoulter)
    AlanPoulter: Both novels speculate realistically about long-range space exploration and colonisation
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Inglês (20)  Sueco (1)  Todos os idiomas (21)
Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I read [Flood] years ago and really enjoyed it, so I had high hopes for this sequel. Unfortunately, Ark didn't quite live up to my expectations. The best parts are those where we see how humanity has adapted to cope with the situation. But we never get to see anything for very long before it's brutally destroyed. The entire story is like this, just people being awful to each other as hope is lost in a bad situation where everything is meaningless. It's too grimdark for my tastes. Also, Baxter seems to be one of these writers who wants to make very sure that you understand he's done his science research, even if it means the story comes to a screeching halt so Science can be Explained. Regrettably, my feelings about the ending are mainly relief that it's over. ( )
  lavaturtle | Dec 28, 2020 |
Ark mostly concludes the grim story begun by Baxter in [b:Flood|2111634|Flood (Flood, #1)|Stephen Baxter|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1327971319s/2111634.jpg|2117042], a particularly un-cosy catastrophe novel wherein global sea levels rose without end. Conflicting and ultimately academic arguments were proffered as to why this was happening. Finally the human race was split between those hoping that the waters would stop their rise and the select few attempting survival on a vast unsinkable ship, Ark III.

As the old saying goes, where there's an Ark III, there's probably an Ark I and Ark II. Hints were given in Flood that Ark I was a spaceship, and one of the central characters was even dropped off partway through the book to board it. This book picks up her story as she joins the crew of an experimental faster-than-light ship meant to carry its crew to a new Earth.

There are some cute touches in the story, such as the plausibility of the faster-than-light drive being questioned by its engineer after it's been used successfully for several years. It's not clear whether this is Baxter hanging a lantern on it or just a subtle apology for the artifice. Given the difficulty in giving humanity plausible FTL by the 2040s, I'd suspect the normally scientifically rigorous Baxter was just saying sorry. It's been a while since I read the book, so I'm not entirely sure if he gives a reason for not making Ark I a generation ship, thus negating the need for FTL, especially since that's ultimately what it becomes.

Why only two stars? It's simply because the unrelenting misery of the story made it nigh-on impossible for me to really enjoy it. Flood was similarly depressing, but at least watching the world go to pieces has appeal, kind of überschadenfreude. Or maybe even kummerspeck. Watching Ark III and its crew fail miserably wasn't fun, but at least there was the promise of its two namesakes to get things right. Without giving the entire story away, things do not go smoothly for Ark I in this book, and any hope that Ark II might get things right are dashed when we give them a brief visit too.

I know Baxter isn't shy about having these grim, unhappy endings on huge scales, but that doesn't make it any easier to digest. I did go out and read Earth II and Earth III, the two short stories that follow on from the events in this book, hoping for some glint of happiness or some much needed closure. I'd be lying if I said I found it there either. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Ark mostly concludes the grim story begun by Baxter in [b:Flood|2111634|Flood (Flood, #1)|Stephen Baxter|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1327971319s/2111634.jpg|2117042], a particularly un-cosy catastrophe novel wherein global sea levels rose without end. Conflicting and ultimately academic arguments were proffered as to why this was happening. Finally the human race was split between those hoping that the waters would stop their rise and the select few attempting survival on a vast unsinkable ship, Ark III.

As the old saying goes, where there's an Ark III, there's probably an Ark I and Ark II. Hints were given in Flood that Ark I was a spaceship, and one of the central characters was even dropped off partway through the book to board it. This book picks up her story as she joins the crew of an experimental faster-than-light ship meant to carry its crew to a new Earth.

There are some cute touches in the story, such as the plausibility of the faster-than-light drive being questioned by its engineer after it's been used successfully for several years. It's not clear whether this is Baxter hanging a lantern on it or just a subtle apology for the artifice. Given the difficulty in giving humanity plausible FTL by the 2040s, I'd suspect the normally scientifically rigorous Baxter was just saying sorry. It's been a while since I read the book, so I'm not entirely sure if he gives a reason for not making Ark I a generation ship, thus negating the need for FTL, especially since that's ultimately what it becomes.

Why only two stars? It's simply because the unrelenting misery of the story made it nigh-on impossible for me to really enjoy it. Flood was similarly depressing, but at least watching the world go to pieces has appeal, kind of überschadenfreude. Or maybe even kummerspeck. Watching Ark III and its crew fail miserably wasn't fun, but at least there was the promise of its two namesakes to get things right. Without giving the entire story away, things do not go smoothly for Ark I in this book, and any hope that Ark II might get things right are dashed when we give them a brief visit too.

I know Baxter isn't shy about having these grim, unhappy endings on huge scales, but that doesn't make it any easier to digest. I did go out and read Earth II and Earth III, the two short stories that follow on from the events in this book, hoping for some glint of happiness or some much needed closure. I'd be lying if I said I found it there either. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
great book, good cross of science theory and sci-fi story, well worth a read. ( )
  grlewry | Sep 22, 2016 |
Ark by Stephen Baxter returns to the Earth as seen in Flood. It's a sequel but at the beginning events from both novels are running concurrently, just in different locations and following different people. Ark follows project Nimrod, or Ark 1. This ark, however, is a spaceship. The story follows the project from the early days when Ark 1 is being developed and young candidates for the crew are being trained, to the flight and subsequent problems that emerge in the flight to Earth 2. Baxter mainly follows three different women: Holle, Venus and Grace.

I enjoyed Flood quite a bit, so I was pleasantly surprised that Ark surpassed it in some ways. Baxter does an excellent job of moving the story forward and developing his characters through dialogue. He covers the science and the sociological aspects that a program like Nimrod would encounter. Baxter deals with some dark, harsh realities that an elite program in a world in crisis, as well as a long space flight, would face. This makes his work eminently readable.

Even though I would imagine that you could read Ark as a stand alone novel, I would suggest reading Flood first, and then Ark. Flood explains some background details. The science isn't daunting either, so if you normally avoid hard science fiction for that reason, Baxter makes it easy to enjoy his novels. It has been a trying couple of weeks, including being forced to wait to finish Ark right after I started it due to other pressing circumstance.

Very Highly Recommended; http://shetreadssoftly.blogspot.com/ ( )
  SheTreadsSoftly | Mar 21, 2016 |
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It's the year 2041. The oceans have risen rapidly, and soon the entire planet will be submerged. But hope has arisen with the discovery of another life-sustaining planet light-year away. Only a small number will be able to make the journey-- and the competition for survival can kill human compassion.

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