Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Golden Notebook (1962)

de Doris Lessing

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
5,402931,958 (3.64)1 / 424
Anna is a writer, author of one very successful novel, who now keeps four notebooks. In one, with a black cover, she reviews the African experience of her earlier years. In a red one she records her political life, her disillusionment with communism. In a yellow one she writes a novel in which the heroine relives part of her own experience. And in a blue one she keeps a personal diary. Finally, in love with an American writer and threatened with insanity, Anna resolves to bring the threads of all four books together in a golden notebook. Doris Lessing's best-known and most influential novel, The Golden Notebook retains its extraordinary power and relevance decades after its initial publication.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porsimply_jennifer, biblioteca privada, mylesleo, bluemondays, RuthMarieLandry
Bibliotecas HistóricasNewton 'Bud' Flounders, David Foster Wallace, Eeva-Liisa Manner
  1. 31
    The Bell Jar de Sylvia Plath (readerbabe1984)
  2. 31
    The Two of Them de Joanna Russ (lquilter)
    lquilter: While reading The Two of Them by Joanna Russ, I was persistently reminded of Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook. The female protagonist's articulated rage, the psychoanalytic approach, the insurmountability of the patriarchy. For readers across genres who liked either of these novels, I would suggest trying the other.… (mais)
  3. 00
    Orwell and Politics (Penguin Modern Classics) de George Orwell (DLSmithies)
    DLSmithies: Alright, this one's tenuous, but bear with me! Orwell has lots of interesting things to say about the socialist movement of the 30s and 40s in Britain and elsewhere, especially in Stalin's Russia. Similarly, the Communist Party in 1950s Britain looms large in the background of The Golden Notebook, and the main character is deeply troubled by the situation in Russia under Stalin (along with everything else that's happening on the world stage at the time). So, you see, there's a link!... ...or maybe it's just me.… (mais)
  4. 12
    DORIS LESSING CHILDREN OF VIOLENCE (geneven)
    geneven: This five-book series is great, though depressing in spots. (I haven't read The Golden Notebook.)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

» Veja também 424 menções

Inglês (80)  Espanhol (5)  Alemão (2)  Francês (2)  Italiano (1)  Búlgaro (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Holandês (1)  Todos os idiomas (93)
Mostrando 1-5 de 93 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Read this one for my book club, and had a lot of mixed thoughts about it. The portrait of what it was like for women during that period of time, just before the second wave of feminism ramped up, was interesting—although having grown up in a household where that was definitely a part of the goings-on, it wasn't news to me. Also the glimpse into the politics of the British Communist Party, which I knew less about. But the nonstop introspection wore on me a bit—the deep dive into unhappy, dissatisfied hearts and minds was a lot to sustain over 600-odd pages. Though it also made me think of my mom a lot, as she lived through that time and that dissatisfaction, which was necessary for her to get to the life she wanted to live. The book was on our shelves growing up, and I do wish I could talk to her about it now.

Ultimately I'm glad I read it. It sparked a great conversation, lots of very different thoughts and opinions, so it was a great book club choice in that sense. I'm happy enough to leave the characters behind, but I keep thinking about it at odd moments, so in that sense it was also a worthwhile reading project (but it did feel like a project). ( )
  lisapeet | Mar 24, 2024 |
The Golden Notebook is the final book on this iteration of my reading list and–unfortunately–was not a case of saving the best for last. It landed on my list as part of TIME magazine's All-TIME 100 as A Book With A Color In Its Title; in hindsight, I would reclassify it as A Book At The Bottom Of Your To-Read List.

Doris Lessing's novel is structurally complex, consisting of six parts, each of which (save one) begins with the continuing story of Anna Wulf, a divorced novelist raising her pre-teen daughter in London, and her friend Molly Jacobs, a divorced actress raising her twenty-year-old son. Within these parts are the contents of four colored notebooks (black, red, yellow, blue), Anna's memoir, political ramblings, fictional musings and diary, respectively. Further complicating the reader's comprehension is the backward revelation of much of Anna's story, where the notebooks reveal fictionalized events in her life prior to Anna as narrator disclosing their "real" counterparts. Add to this the climax of the novel—the simultaneous mental breakdowns of fictional-Anna and her Sybil-like male flat mate, and you have a confused collection of stories about a promiscuous former communist living an intellectually vacuous life off the royalties of her one and only novel.

While this schizophrenic structure is probably intended to give the reader the feeling of sharing Anna's breakdown, I found it numbingly over-complicated. Tellingly, Lessing often felt her first-person narrator needed to identify herself by name (e.g. "I, Anna...") so the reader could distinguish between Anna's "real" and fictive narration. The scenes at the beginning of each part are mostly dialogue paired with intrusive adverbs ("he said angrily") using an anonymous narration, no character point-of-view that often doesn't provide sufficient information to understand why particular statements are made. While the novel also suffers repetitive dream sequences and abstruse conversations between Anna and her psychoanalyst, my main objection is that Anna is simply an unlikeable character whose convictions vacillate in reaction to every sentence spoken to her. Compounding my dislike is her annoying role as analytical observer, criticizing others with a false sophistication when she herself is so flawed.

My copy of The Golden Notebook is 623 pages long; on page 565, Anna finally admits she's had writer's block since her highly successful debut novel. To me, this novel reads like Lessing suffered the same problem and has just stitched together several discordant attempts at a novel similar to Anna's efforts in the fictive story. ( )
  skavlanj | Jan 14, 2024 |
3.5 stars because of its originality but this is really hard to read and understand. Even now having read the book, I am not sure if I grasped its meaning. ( )
  siok | Nov 26, 2023 |
Ho incrociato (letterariamente parlando, s'intende) per la prima volta Doris Lessing nel 2007, quando io ero al liceo e lei vinceva il Nobel per la letteratura. La mia professoressa d'inglese voleva convincere la mia classe a fare non ricordo più che progetto sul suo discorso per l'accettazione del Nobel, ma, con suo grande rammarico, non ebbe successo. Tra parentesi, dovrei recuperarlo, ne ho un ottimo ricordo.

Da allora, è stata una delle autrici accantonate in un angolo della mia testa in attesa di una chance, che si è presentata quando Il taccuino d'oro ha catturato il mio sguardo in libreria ed è tornato a casa con me.

Questo è sicuramente uno dei suoi lavori più famosi, annoverato tra i migliori romanzi del Novecento e acclamato come uno dei classici della letteratura femminista, sebbene l'autrice non amasse questa definizione. “Femminista” per lei era un aggettivo troppo pregno di superficialità su donne e uomini per i suoi gusti.

Per Doris Lessing non c'era niente di semplice, nel rapporto tra uomini e donne, uno dei grandi temi de Il taccuino d'oro. Anzi, è così complesso che le sue dinamiche si perdono in intrecci inestricabili nei quali diventa impossibile stare insieme. Anna Wulf, protagonista e voce narrante de Il taccuino d'oro, ci racconta delle sue relazioni sentimentali e ci catapulta nel suo mondo, coinvolgendoci al punto nei suoi pensieri da farci provare le sue stesse sensazioni, da non lasciarci il tempo di elaborare quanto stiamo leggendo. Possiamo solo provare ciò che prova Anna e che trascrive nei suoi taccuini (quattro, caratterizzati da colori diversi, nero, rosso, giallo, blu, più il taccuino d'oro, che li riunisce tutti).

Eppure la discrepanza tra ciò che lo scrittore riporta e ciò che vive preoccupa grandemente Anna. Quello che scrive, per quanto si sforzi, è sempre un'interpretazione successiva di quanto avvenuto e non è possibile riportare esattamente un'esperienza. È una questione che la angustia: cosa può valere quello che scrivo se è tutto falsato?

Altro grande tema de Il taccuino d'oro è il rapporto tra genitori e figli, anche questo difficile e lontanissimo dai banali ti-voglio-bene-figlio e ti-voglio-bene-madre/padre. Il rapporto tra Molly, amica di Anna, con suo figlio Tommy, per esempio, presenta un lato oscuro che fa scorrere tentacoli di disagio nella nostra mente. Invece, Anna scopre in sua figlia un desiderio di normalità che, dall'alto del suo anticonformismo, gliela fa quasi compatire.

Il taccuino d'oro, però, non è solo un romanzo sui rapporti personali, ma strizza l'occhio anche alle vicende del vasto mondo, del quale Anna è intensamente partecipe, prima in Africa, dove il problema della discriminazione è tristemente presente, e poi nel Regno Unito, dove i suoi rapporti con il partito comunista si fanno sempre più difficili.

Anna guarda il mondo e ne rimane sgomenta. Vede luoghi dove ancora mancano i diritti più elementari e vede luoghi dove alcuni di questi diritti sono stati applicati. Ma quanto sono fragili questi ultimi! Cosa può la democrazia contro l'odio e la direzione oscura che l'umanità rischia di intraprendere (e forse ha già intrapreso)? Anna è terrorizzata dalla stessa idea, dalle orribili conseguenze di un'ipotetica guerra e il suo terrore diventa il nostro: un terrore che rimane unicamente intellettuale, ma ci investe con una forza devastante.

E... e ho scritto un poema senza neanche arrivare vicino a quella che è la complessità di questo romanzo, alla varietà di riflessioni che scatena nel lettore. Certo non è un romanzo facile e, quando si arriva alla fine, si ha voglia di rileggerlo perché lascia la sensazione di non averne colto il senso, di aver tralasciato dettagli cruciali che sul momento non sembravano importanti.

Anna è una donna in frantumi in cerca della sua completezza, anche se dà l'impressione di essere una donna libera e indipendente. E, in una certa misura, lo è: è economicamente indipendente ed è dotata di un vivace spirito critico. Allora perché Anna non è libera? Perché non si sente libera? È perché sente il bisogno di un uomo accanto a sé? O perché è prigioniera della sua testa? Dell'impossibilità di essere intera?

Non lo so. Non so neanche se ci sia una risposta ne Il taccuino d'oro. Quello che so è che questo romanzo continua a vorticarmi in testa anche dopo una settimana che l'ho finito. Ergo, non posso far altro che consigliarlo a chiunque abbia voglia di farsi shakerare un po' la materia grigia. ( )
  lasiepedimore | Sep 12, 2023 |
Some people read and even enjoy reading more than one book at a time. Personally, I like to focus on one book at a time and my first beef with the Golden Notebook was that it felt like I was reading at least four different novels. The main novel centered around Anna and once I got used to the author's style, I realized that all the novels contained alter egos of Anna, and came to understand and respect the the courage it took Lessing to write a novel in this fashion. But my second beef with the novel had to do with Anna and her alter ego characters . From what I've read about award winning author Doris Lessing, this was in many ways a very auto biographical novel. And it's often considered one of the first and finest works of feminist literature and that really puzzled me. Because while the character of Anna did raise a child by herself, without the aid of a man, she was in no way a role model. She hopped in and out of bed with countless strangers, falling for and clinging to them, only to be hurt again and again. This vicious cycle got so bad it nearly led to a mental breakdown. So while this novel was interesting at times, I just don't understand how it can be considered a work of feminist literature ( )
  kevinkevbo | Jul 14, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 93 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (16 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Lessing, Dorisautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Marcellino, FredDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stevenson, JulietNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Valentí, HelenaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vink, NettieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Prêmios

Notable Lists

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The two women were alone in the London flat.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Ella decides to write again, searches herself for the book which is already written inside her, and waiting to be written down. She spends a great deal of time alone, waiting to discern the outlines of this book inside her.
Having a child means being conscious of the clock, never being free of something that has to be done at a certain moment ahead. I was sitting on the floor this afternoon, watching the sky darken, an inhabitant of a world where one can say, the quality of light means it must be evening, instead of: in exactly an hour I must put on the vegetables.
The essence of the book, the organisation of it, everything in it, says implicitly and explicitly, that we must not divide things off, must not compartmentalise.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Anna is a writer, author of one very successful novel, who now keeps four notebooks. In one, with a black cover, she reviews the African experience of her earlier years. In a red one she records her political life, her disillusionment with communism. In a yellow one she writes a novel in which the heroine relives part of her own experience. And in a blue one she keeps a personal diary. Finally, in love with an American writer and threatened with insanity, Anna resolves to bring the threads of all four books together in a golden notebook. Doris Lessing's best-known and most influential novel, The Golden Notebook retains its extraordinary power and relevance decades after its initial publication.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.64)
0.5 9
1 32
1.5 6
2 66
2.5 21
3 131
3.5 48
4 206
4.5 29
5 183

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 205,868,752 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível