Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (2009)

de Michael J. Sandel

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,109377,821 (4.2)37
Popular Harvard professor Michael Sandel offers a searching, lyrical exploration of the meaning of justice that considers familiar controversies such as affirmative action, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, national service, patriotism and dissent, and the moral limits of markets in fresh and illuminating ways.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 37 menções

Inglês (34)  Espanhol (1)  Holandês (1)  Todos os idiomas (36)
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I not only recommend this as a book to be read, I recommend it as a book to be read twice.

And while I do not see it as entirely unblemished, its attempt to place serious moral and ethical issues in front of us is not only laudable, it is critical to us addressing transnational challenges such as climate change, immigration, and the concentration of wealth.

I was drawn to read this book from the many accolades Michael Sandel generates from the admirers of his very popular course at Harvard University on morality and good government.

But this book, “Justice: What’s the right thing to do?” is not about justice, per se. It is an intellectual exercise in constructing what a fair society would look like were we in a position to build one.

More particularly, the book is a prescription about how the United States of America would operate if it were a fair society.

If I were writing a book about justice, about where to get it and how recognize it, I would probably write a book about the courts, who run them, and which courts you are likely to get better justice than some others.

I don’t think anybody expects to see justice meted out at the corner gas station, or in the playground or, God forbid, on Capitol Hill. But that is exactly what the sound bites on the 6pm news would like us to believe: that somebody really high up is gonna get justice for the ordinary man.

While this book is a few years old its lessons for legislators are clear: good laws and good government does not come from pandering to people who have accumulated wealth by virtue of birth, or merit, or even of citizenship. No.

Good government comes from promoting the common good, by building a sense of community, by using markets to promote economic activity not as an excuse to underinvest in social good, and reversing the trend toward the concentration of wealth.

(I think a young Barack Obama must have sat in on Sandel’s lectures.)

Sandel sees the objects of government in the US as promoting to some degree the welfare of its citizens, but protecting freedoms guaranteed by the founders, and by promoting the good in people and society.

He takes issue with the current Republican consensus that government by definition is bad and big government to be avoided at all costs. And while there is no real social contract in the conduct of government in the US, it is understood that government rule with the consent of the ruled.

America took a huge gamble electing Donald Trump as its semi-sovereign leader for a four year term as President. Trump mocked those who trusted government, he mocked its governors, and he spit on its institutions going right up to the transfer of power to his successor.

Trump exploited people’s rather fuzzy idea of what government does, and certainly what America’s federal government does. According to Trump, only chumps follow the law.

This book is written during the Obama years, not the Trump years. I loook forward to reading Sandel’s interpretation of the Trump years in the cause of good government.

Sandel quite rightly asserts that that an unbiased application of the laws is not only impossible but wholly undesireable, and he relies to some extent on what Aristotle believed was the duty of government: to promote public virtue even when the understanding of what constitutes the good and the right in America is hugely debatable.

But that doesn’t mean debating these values is wholly useless in public life.

For many years I have questioned the efficacy of putting the rights of individuals into laws without an equal and corresponding list of civic duties in those documents. In my opinion, public life is stained by the trumpeting of rights without obligations. Obligations of the rich and the poor, the educated, the advantaged and the disadvantaged to make government more fair, more relevant, and with much less inertia built into the system.

Nobody knows exactly how many Federal laws are on the books in the United States. In Canada, my understanding is that there are more 65,000 federal laws alone even before an elected official gets to make one more.

When people ask why is it so hard to get the laws WE want, they certainly must understand the battle that exists between the laws that are already there, and the good those laws are trying to promote. ( )
  MylesKesten | Jan 23, 2024 |
The author is Professor of Government at Harvard University and the book jacket says his course, "Justice", "is one of the most popular and influential at Harvard. Up to a thousand students pack the campus theater to hear Sandel relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of the day, and this fall, public television will air a series based on the course." I read this book faster than I should have because I needed to return it to the library but it's the kind of book I'd like to keep and read slowly so I have time to think about the questions the author raises. Sandel uses philosophy to "...make sense of politics, morality, and our own convictions as well." Among others, some the the conflicts he discusses in the book are affirmative action, physician-assisted suicide, national service, and patriotism. This is the kind of book that can start some interesting discussion. I'm looking forward to the PBS series. ( )
  ellink | Jan 22, 2024 |
Four stars because it was an engaging read that reintroduced me to philosophers I had all but forgotten (mostly Kant, who is wrong in such interesting and productive ways). Sandel helped me to clarify my own muddled and contradictory political / ethical beliefs - he's a great storyteller who brings very dense works of philosophy to life with engaging thought experiments and clear discussions.

However, I was ambivalent about Sandel's arguments at the end of the book and wish he had contextualized his argument by questioning his own methods. Is it intellectually honest or efficacious to apply philosophical methods to politics? (Read: rationalist though I am, shouldn't I be suspicious of the opinions of a bunch of old white guys who, for the most part, thought they lived in an orderly clockwork universe?) Some of my lingering questions:

(a) What gives modern nation-states the right or duty to enact justice? Is the political system of the United States designed to enact justice? How much does the duty of government to create a just society converge with the duties of government as formally enshrined in the U.S. Constitution?

(b) Are political debates about justice best understood as rational dialogues, or can they be better understood as expressions of power, emotion, and/or ideology?

(c) To what extent do the rational methods of Western philosophy actually help us enact justice? Could it be that those methods actually obscure the role of emotion and culture in our ethical lives?

(d) What is the relationship between biology, culture, and justice? If something is almost universally valued by human beings (like caring for children) or universally valued by a culture (like monogamous marriage), is enshrining it in law an ethical decision or a pragmatic one?

So, yeah, I thought about this book a lot, and I would like to read more on this subject. But I find it difficult to be satisfied by any philosophical discussion so embedded in a specific political context. ( )
  raschneid | Dec 19, 2023 |
A tougher read with some difficult concepts to grasp. Many sections required more than one reading to grasp the nuances. That being said, there are ideas here that are worth making the effort to consider. Sandel dives deep into the foundations of modern democracy and finds some parts lacking, but he also points the way towards improvement. He certainly helped me to clarify why I have some of the stances that I do. ( )
  BBrookes | Nov 25, 2023 |
Editora Civilização Brasileira
  Camargos_livros | Aug 28, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

Pertence à série publicada

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Kiku, with love
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In the summer of 2004, Hurricane Charley roared out of the Gulf of Mexico and swept across Florida to the Atlantic Ocean.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

Popular Harvard professor Michael Sandel offers a searching, lyrical exploration of the meaning of justice that considers familiar controversies such as affirmative action, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, national service, patriotism and dissent, and the moral limits of markets in fresh and illuminating ways.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.2)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 24
3.5 12
4 86
4.5 10
5 82

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 208,881,058 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível