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The Future of an Illusion (The Standard…
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The Future of an Illusion (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological… (original: 1927; edição: 1989)

de Sigmund Freud (Autor)

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Reprint of the 1928 edition. The Future of an Illusion is a book written by Sigmund Freud in 1927. It describes his interpretation of religion's origins, development, psychoanalysis, and its future. Freud describes religion as an illusion, as one of the wishes that are the "fulfillments of the oldest, strongest, and most urgent wishes of mankind". This title remains a landmark work of the 20th century.… (mais)
Membro:sdepangher
Título:The Future of an Illusion (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud)
Autores:Sigmund Freud (Autor)
Informação:W. W. Norton & Company (1989), Edition: The Standard, 112 pages
Coleções:Pre-Modern/Modern History, Sua biblioteca
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The Future of an Illusion de Sigmund Freud (1927)

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But surely infantilism is destined to be surmounted. Men cannot remain children for ever; they must in the end go out into 'hostile life'. We may call this 'education to reality. Need I confess to you that the whole purpose of my book is to point out the necessity for this forward step?

This isn't exactly theory, but more a prose poem or maybe agitprop. Freud deftly employs a dialogue method aiming for some persuasive measure, though accepting that his words aren't likely to influence the unwilling. He does paraphrase his opponents well. While remaining a plea, the text is an eloquent one. His style is adroit and drenched in wit (see Freud's thoughts on Prohibition). There is much to be said about a sociology of the murderous: denizens who would overthrow the yoke of civilization at the first opportunity. Here's to austerity measures and prayer in schools. ( )
1 vote jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
There were some points of good insight, but many broad strokes and the lack of real self-criticism made it hard to take Freud too seriously. ( )
  cambernard90 | Apr 12, 2017 |
In The Future of an Illusion, Freud suggests as a germinal postulate of religion, “Life in this world … signifies a perfecting of man’s nature. It is probably the spiritual part of man, the soul …” (23). The Greek for soul is psyche. Psychoanalysis, which set itself the task of diagnosing and treating the psyche (and not merely the conscious mind, nor the organic brain as such), seems to be a phenomenon in some measure tailor-made to supplement, supplant, or substitute for religion. Freud presented a clear claim that religion is a mass neurosis, not only in The Future of an Illusion, but also in his later work Moses and Monotheism. To the extent that one sees the collective problem of religious ‘delusion’ as analogous to obsessional neurosis in the individual, one might take psychoanalysis, the custodian of techniques to address the latter, as a point of departure to cope with the former. And while he does not make light of the difficulty in coming to do without traditional religions, Freud insists on the desirability and even “fatal inevitability” of such “growth” in the human condition (55).

The “care of souls” is the pastoral function in Christian religion, and equally a mission of psychoanalysis as a therapeutic institution, with its priestly class of analysts. Freud does not hold himself back from the pleasures of religiously-based rhetoric. For example, he writes that “the questions which religious doctrine finds it so easy to answer” ... “might be called too sacred” to be addressed in a traditional, unquestioning manner (40). Taking a cue from the Dutch anti-colonialist Multatuli, Freud makes reference to “our God, Logos” slowly fulfilling the desires of mankind (69). And he sometimes shows a rather “religious” tendency (as he would perhaps describe it) to pick and choose among scientific theories for the sake of doctrinal coherence in psychoanalysis.

In one of his devil’s advocate passages in The Future of an Illusion, Freud remarks, “If you want to expel religion from our European civilization, you can only do it by means of another system of doctrines,” which would itself engender a functional religion, with all of the concomitant drawbacks (65-6). In replying to his own objection, Freud emphasizes the desired differences in his post-religious system: it is to be non-delusive and more capable of being corrected. It will be science, not religion. But Freudian psychoanalysis, for all of its scientific trappings, is already at some remove from the positivist territory of the physical sciences. It is no closer to, say, biology, than the monotheism of Moses was to the polytheistic religion of eastern Mediterranean antiquity. In effect, Freud’s proposal is that the superstitious religion of traditions focused on God should be replaced in the future with a scientific religion trained on the soul.
3 vote paradoxosalpha | Feb 16, 2017 |
11
  OberlinSWAP | Aug 1, 2015 |
Perhaps relevant in his times, but utter BS today. Our life is, essentially, a dream. If you are pessimistic enough to call any religion a collective illusion or neurosis, then you should have the courage and intellectual honesty to call your entire life, religious or non religious, an illusion and a neurosis.
One more intellectual to load on the "Ooops, I missed the point" wagon. On to the next one! Oh, nice to meet you, prof. Dawkins... ( )
  tabascofromgudreads | Apr 19, 2014 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Freud, Sigmundautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Šuvajevs, IgorsTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gay, PeterIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rand, PaulDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Robson-Scott, W. D.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Strachey, JamesEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Whiteside, ShaunTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Reprint of the 1928 edition. The Future of an Illusion is a book written by Sigmund Freud in 1927. It describes his interpretation of religion's origins, development, psychoanalysis, and its future. Freud describes religion as an illusion, as one of the wishes that are the "fulfillments of the oldest, strongest, and most urgent wishes of mankind". This title remains a landmark work of the 20th century.

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