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One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962)

de Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

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13,092202474 (4.04)522
One of the most extraordinary literary documents to have emerged from the Soviet Union, this is the story of labor camp inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov and his struggle to maintain his dignity in the face of Communist oppression. Based on the author's own experience in the gulags, where he spent nearly a decade as punishment for making derogatory remarks against Stalin, the novel is an unforgettable portrait of the entire world of Stalin's forced work camps. An instant classic upon publication in 1962, it confirmed Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's international stature as "a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy" (Harrison Salisbury).… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 202 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book is pretty much exactly what you'd expect. It's a day in the life of a man in a Soviet labor camp/gulag. I wouldn't say I enjoyed reading it, but it was fine. I'm not sure I really got much out of it since I feel like no matter what you can never *really* understand what it was these people went through. Like he said a warm man can never really understand a cold one. It was good, but I just can't really bring myself to be enthusiastic about it? This just feels like a book you'd read in high school to learn empathy and yeah I'm empathetic but IDK maybe I'm being too harsh. It was pretty good all things considered and I can see why it's historically important as well. ( )
  ZetaRiemann | Apr 9, 2024 |
First published in 1962, this was the first book that openly talked about life in the Soviet gulag system. The story is very simple, it follows a single day in the life of a former Russian solider, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, now serving 10 years hard labour in Siberia after being falsely accused of treason because he was an escaped German POW.

The authorities claimed that "he’d returned from captivity to carry out a mission for German intelligence. What sort of mission neither Shukhov nor the interrogator could say…. Shukhov had it all figured out. If he didn’t sign he’d be shot. If he signed he’d still get a chance to live. So he signed."

The thing about this book that really struck me was that nothing really happens and is almost devoid of any emotions. Shukhov is counting the days down to his supposed release date with no idea as to whether or not it will actually happen yet shows almost no discontentment at all. He just goes through the motions of his day, the same day he has had thousands of times before. In fact, he feels almost serenely fortunate at the end of it because he'd managed to get hold of some extra food and smuggle a piece of scrap metal back into camp that he will be able to fashion into a tool with which earn extra rations in the future. However, he also realises that tomorrow the daily struggle to survive will resume.

“The belly is a demon. It doesn’t remember how well you treated it yesterday; it’ll cry out for more tomorrow.”

Solzhenitsyn writes from personal experience, he spent eight years in the gulag. The simplicity of this tale makes it a remarkable piece of powerful writing that shines a spotlight on an important piece of social history as well as being a history maker in itself. As such it deserves to be regarded as a classic. ( )
  PilgrimJess | Apr 2, 2024 |
I read Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago not that long ago, so although One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is a fictional novel I had a fair idea of what to expect. As with the Gulag Archipelago, what's startling in Solzhenitsyn's writing is that there's never any sense of self-pity, and black humour is always bubbling just below the surface.

This novel does what it says in the title. There's little reminiscing by the protagonist of life before the camp, nor wishing away the days to freedom (for as Ivan Denisovich knows, freedom may never come, with exile likely after he finishes his ten year sentence, if indeed another sentence isn't landed on him before that one finishes). The slim novel focuses on a regular day in this inmate's life in camp and is a glimpse into the reality of what millions of Russians endured - harsh work in extreme sub-zero temperatures in inadequate clothing with a belly half-empty from meagre food rations.

Given the extreme conditions that Solzhenitsyn writes of, his style intrigued me in this novel as it did in the NF Gulag Archipelago. Such is his protagonist's lack of self-absorption in the misery that's been inflicted on him, it's not a novel that left me with a profound sense of horror about the conditions the prisoners lived in. What sticks with me more is the grit and mental toughness of Solzhenitsyn (for this novel is undoubtedly based on his own experience as a prisoner). The novel even ends with a positive reflection by Ivan Denisovich, as he lies in his cold bunk with ice on the ceiling and his legs shoved into his coat sleeves, of all the things that had gone right that day, from not falling ill as he'd thought he would at the start of the day, to some extra rations for favours and his team not getting put to the worst of the work. It's remarkable, and perhaps that's the biggest insight of all - that those who survived were the people who were able to sustain the right mentality attitude and focus throughout these long sentences.

4 stars - an enjoyable read. Perhaps it would have been more shocking to me if I'd not read Gulag Archipelago relatively recently. ( )
  AlisonY | Mar 30, 2024 |
The publishing of this condemnation of the Stalinist gulags in 1962 (possible only because it fit with Krushchev's anti-Stalinist line) was a huge event in Soviet Russia. A parallel might be found in America in the publishing of the 9/11 Commission's report, which hit the top of bestseller lists and even surprisingly won some literary acclaim. Both works sought to shed light on a monumental national tragedy infused with politics, and touched a deep nerve in their respective publics. Solzhenitsyn's work has the advantage of brevity at about 160 pages versus about 560, a narrow focus, a novelist's sharp pen, and the ability to make us shiver in the freezing Siberian morning.

Bonus from reading: understanding the reference when your favorite right-wing intellectual hysterically claims that an Obama administration will turn the American people into zeks.

( )
  lelandleslie | Feb 24, 2024 |
I ran across this slim novel while doing some book organizing and in light of Navalny's death, thought it would be a good time to finally read it. The 182 pages pack a powerful punch, and the book does exactly what it says on the tin - describes what it's like from when he wakes up to when he puts his head down after a long day of surviving in a Siberian hard-labor prison camp. I felt the cold, I felt the hunger, I felt the pleasure of a job well done after bricklaying, the pleasure of an extra serving of bread, the last smoke from the gift of a dying cigarette. ( )
  LisaMorr | Feb 22, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 202 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This quiet tale has struck a powerful blow against the return of the horrors of the Stalin system. For Solzhenitsyn's words burn like acid.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (74 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Solzhenitsyn, Alexanderautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Aitken, GillonTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bayley, JohnIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bogosian, EricPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Harwood, RonaldIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hayward, MaxTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hingley, RonaldTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kalb, Marvin L.Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Korte, HansNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Labedz, LeopoldIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lahtela, MarkkuTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Neizvestny, ErnstArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Parker, RalphTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Shonk, KatherineIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tvardovsky, AlexanderPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Valiulina, SanaPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Von Block, BelaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vries, Theun dePosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vries, Theun deTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Willetts, Harry T.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Zelma, GeorgiCover photographerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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One of the most extraordinary literary documents to have emerged from the Soviet Union, this is the story of labor camp inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov and his struggle to maintain his dignity in the face of Communist oppression. Based on the author's own experience in the gulags, where he spent nearly a decade as punishment for making derogatory remarks against Stalin, the novel is an unforgettable portrait of the entire world of Stalin's forced work camps. An instant classic upon publication in 1962, it confirmed Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's international stature as "a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy" (Harrison Salisbury).

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