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Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?: Stories…
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Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?: Stories (original: 1976; edição: 1992)

de Raymond Carver (Autor)

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1,605168,183 (4.14)25
With this, his first collection, Carver breathed new life into the short story. In the pared-down style that has since become his hallmark, Carver showed how humour and tragedy dwell in the hearts of ordinary people, and won a readership that grew with every subsequent brilliant collection of stories, poems and essays that appeared in the last eleven years of his life.… (mais)
Membro:coleslater
Título:Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?: Stories
Autores:Raymond Carver (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (1992), Edition: 1st Vintage contemporaries ed, 251 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? Stories de Raymond Carver (1976)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I finished this book last year but just got the mood to do its review. This compilation is my second Carver, but I personally prefer the stories in "What We Talk About When We Talk About Love." His writing style in this still top-notch, he wrote it with his own rules. And just like other Carver's book, it perfectly tells us there's more about mundane life than what it seems. Sometimes I don't know which way the story will actually end, but that's how real life is. Each of their stories speaks up to me, making me want to re-read it and write the analysis in the future. ( )
  bellacrl | Jan 19, 2021 |
Not my thing. ( )
  victorvila | Oct 29, 2020 |
Read Carver's collections in reverse order. My understanding is that this was his first collection. I can see a maturity of sorts in Cathedral, which came later but this collection is incredible, too. "Put Yourself in My Shoes" is extraordinary. It's given me a lot to think about and I love the devices employed: story within story. "Please Will You Be Quiet, Please?" the final story - phew! So glad I discovered this guy. Man, what talent. ( )
  shaundeane | Sep 13, 2020 |
Reading this collection of short stories had me thinking of two other authors: Hemingway, for his iceberg principle; and Bukowski, for his grunginess. Not like Kerouac, for there is a definite late 1960s/early 1970s feel to the characters and situations, and not quite as grungy as Bukowski, but certainly Hemingway-esque in the way the story doesn't leave you for some time after reading. I think, too, that Carver's work does to the imagination what Hemingway's iceberg principle does, but on steroids.

Hemingway left enough for the imagination, and at times I would read commentary on his work and discover something I had missed. But with Carver, I have read commentaries that envision his stories as they are written. In many, I found my imagination unresolved, wondering what happened next, what was meant, but delightfully bewildered all the same.

I knew little about Carver and chose the book because I like the Vintage Classics series. After reading, I went to The Paris Review and the Poetry Foundation to see what else I could learn about Carver. From his late interviews, he appears rather Stoic (as opposed to stoic) in his philosophy, and humble in that he worked for most of his life and only achieved fame much later.

I was also impressed by his gratitude towards his partner, fellow poet Tess Gallagher, who would read and provide feedback on Carver's work after the fourth draft. Gallagher is now in her mid-70s and has a book of poetry to be released in 2019.

I recall Scott Fitzgerald commenting that nobody wanted to read about poor people, but Carver writes about lower-middle class people who end up realising that they won't ever really get ahead. I could feel the grunge from my 1970s childhood in his stories, even though geographically I was on the other side of the world and so young.

What I like about Carver's work is that it takes me back to a time that is somewhat familiar, and much harder to glorify. Conversely, Hemingway's era was so long ago that it is all new. Carver's era has a touch of sentimentality (for me), but his subjects are such that there is less nostalgia, more "things are different now yet somehow the same".

Carver's subjects are not rags to riches or riches to rags stories; they are people striving to be more than they are and then becoming bankrupt or divorced or alcoholic or just downright strange as they do what they do. There is no real political statement in his work, rather a social commentary, stemming from his own upbringing.

These are wonderful stories and I enjoyed the way Carver makes my imagination work, even to the point of frustration. I also like that there is no way to find out what he really meant - he meant for the reader to reach their own conclusion.

This work would have made my day in high school English. Whenever we were asked what the author meant in a particular work, I would become frustrated with the teacher telling us and say something like "How are we supposed to know that. Did you ask them?" I've heard this same rot from my students!

But there appears to be an absence of hidden meaning and morality in Carver's work. In his own words, literature is "superior amusement", and maybe with a hint of spirituality. I found the grunginess of the stories frighteningly familiar, as if all of my embarrassing failures in life had been recorded and put into a collection of short stories.

That, I believe is what Carver does best. He captures the lives of ordinary battlers and uses his experiences and the stories he has heard from others as the baseline for a work of fiction, fiction that is true enough to be real but fictional enough not to be true.

If ever there was a genre that combined Hemingway's and Bukowski's styles, then this is it. Apparently, Carver didn't like his style being referred to as "minimalist". I wonder how he would feel about "grunge iceberg"? ( )
  madepercy | Dec 26, 2018 |
Cigaret, cigarette, whatever. ( )
  wordsampersand | Dec 6, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
In Raymond Carver's mechanistic universe there is such an economy of equilibrium that the slightest act may slip a cog and break down the whole machine. He works meticulously, fitting the pieces in place, squinting at each fact in the chain through a jeweler's eyepiece. Then, suddenly, he opens a door a crack, lighting up a whole room.
adicionado por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Richard F. Lingeman (Web site pago) (Apr 30, 1976)
 
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With this, his first collection, Carver breathed new life into the short story. In the pared-down style that has since become his hallmark, Carver showed how humour and tragedy dwell in the hearts of ordinary people, and won a readership that grew with every subsequent brilliant collection of stories, poems and essays that appeared in the last eleven years of his life.

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