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The Widow of the South de Robert Hicks
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The Widow of the South (edição: 2006)

de Robert Hicks (Autor)

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2,312746,814 (3.59)98
A story based on the true experiences of a Civil War heroine finds Carrie McGavock witnessing the bloodshed of the Battle of Franklin, falling in love with a wounded man, and dedicating her home as a burial site for fallen soldiers.
Membro:skatie8991
Título:The Widow of the South
Autores:Robert Hicks (Autor)
Informação:Grand Central Publishing (2006), Edition: Reprint, 448 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Widow of the South de Robert Hicks

  1. 00
    My Name is Mary Sutter de Robin Oliveira (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  2. 00
    Enemy Women de Paulette Jiles (juniperSun)
    juniperSun: Both deal with how Southern women were affected by the Civil War, doing what needed to be done to survive
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Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Rabck from BookstoGive; second book I've read about the battle of Franklin and Carnton Plantation. Carrie's house was requisitioned as a field hospital for the bloodiest battle yet in the Civil War. A Southern bred plantation wife, Carrie & her Creole servant, Mariah, along with others, tend to the overwhelming amount of wounded that filled every nook and cranny in the house & finally spill out into the yard. They become "her boys". She writes letters to their kin, and many write to her looking for their kin. Quite a few years later, when a neighbor's field is going to be plowed, Carrie's husband and others relocate 1500 of the Confederate bodies to land adjacent to her family cemetery, burying them by their state and marking the graves with their initials. Carrie keeps a full accounting of their names in a book, and for the rest of her life, she and Mariah walk the gravesite to honor what she told their kin - they would be remembered. Interestingly, the author is on the preservation committee for Carnton, which is how he had access to a lot of research for the book. ( )
  nancynova | Feb 7, 2023 |
great historical fiction ( )
  kslade | Nov 29, 2022 |
Read years ago - and loved it. Sad to know Robert Hicks passed March 4th, at the age of 71.

( )
  DonnaEverhart | Jun 21, 2022 |
Took a while before I got caught up in this book, but it turned out to be a very worthwhile read. I can remember driving through Franklin when I was on my "tour" several years ago of places where my great-great-grandfather fought in the Civil War, but I didn't stop, as Franklin wasn't part of his history. But I could picture the countryside, and I could imagine some of what my ancestor must have gone through, and the book made me wonder more about the character of Nathan Bedford Forrest. ( )
  MarkLacy | May 29, 2022 |
The Battle of Franklin took place in Tennessee on November 30, 1864, just months before the American Civil War’s official end at Appomattox. The battle was a devastating loss for the Confederate side, with casualty figures far exceeding those of other battles. The army designated Carnton, a plantation owned by John McGavock, as a hospital. McGavock’s wife, Carrie, threw herself into caring for the wounded and dying soldiers.

Carrie knows grief, having lost three of her five children. She lives in isolation, rarely going into town. Besides her family, the only person Carrie is in close contact with is Mariah, a Black woman about Carrie’s age, who was a childhood companion and accompanied Carrie when she married John. At first she resists the Army’s demand to take over her house, and is surprised to find herself responding to a call of sorts, working around the clock to provide bandages, water, food, and shelter. After the war, Carrie learns that a prosperous man in town plans to plow up a nearby field that was used as a cemetery. She successfully intervenes and organizes a reburial of all the men interred there, with stones marking each person’s place of rest.

The Widow of the South is Carrie’s story, a fictional account of historic events. Carrie’s role in the creation of the cemetery is well documented, but as is often the case with female historic figures, there is much about her life that is unknown. The novel is an interesting imagining of likely events and circumstances that might have caused Carrie to behave as she did. The author’s note at the end of the book includes photos of Carrie and her family, commentary separating fact from fiction, an an extensive bibliography. I enjoyed reading about a part of Civil War history completely unfamiliar to me, and am glad Robert Hicks chose to celebrate the Carrie McGavock’s important role. ( )
  lauralkeet | Jun 1, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A thunderous, action-rich first novel of the Civil War, based on historical fact.

Music publisher Hicks treats a long-overlooked episode of the war in this account of the Battle of Franklin, Tenn., which took place in November 1864 near Nashville. As a field hospital is pitched in her field, Carrie McGavock, an iron-spined farm woman and upstanding citizen of the town, takes it upon herself to tend after the Confederate wounded; later, she and her husband will rebury 1,500 of the fallen on their property. Hicks centers much of the story on Carrie, who has seen her own children die of illness and who has endurance in her blood. “I was not a morbid woman,” Carrie allows, “but if death wanted to confront me, well, I would not turn my head. Say what you have to say to me, or leave me alone.” Other figures speak their turn. One is a young Union officer amazed at the brutal and sometimes weird tableaux that unfold before him; as the bullets fly, he pauses before a 12-year-old rebel boy suffocating under the weight of his piled-up dead comrades. “Suffocated. I had never considered the possibility,” young Lt. Stiles sighs. Another is an Arkansas soldier taken prisoner by the Yankees: “I became a prisoner and accepted all the duties of a prisoner just as easily as I’d picked up the damned colors and walked forward to the bulwarks.” Yet another is Nathan Forrest, who would strike fear in many a heart as a Confederate cavalryman, and later as the founder of the Ku Klux Klan. Hicks renders each of these figures with much attention to historical detail and a refreshing lack of genre cliché, closing with a subtle lament for the destruction of history before the bulldozer: “One longs to know that some things don’t change, that some of us will not be forgotten, that our perambulations upon the earth are not without point or destination.”

An impressive addition to the library of historical fiction on the Civil War, worthy of a place alongside The Killer Angels, Rifles for Watie and Shiloh.
adicionado por Richardrobert | editarKirkus Reivews (Jun 1, 2005)
 
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Prologue ∙ 1894: Down the rows of the dead they came. Neat, orderly rows of dead rebel boys who thirty years before had either dropped at the foot of earthen works a mile or so away or died on the floors of the big house overlooking the cemetery.
Author's Note: If God was watching that Indian summer afternoon of November 30, 1864 (and some have argued that He was not, another explanation of events), He would have been looking here: on the continent of North America; in the southeastern section of what had once been and would again be called the United States; in the central part of a state they called Tennessee; between the mountains and the great river; among the burial mounds of an ancient Stone Age culture that had known nothing of firearms and artillery; in the bend of a small river at the convergence of three bright macadam roads, where brilliant streaks of light rose and fell along a gentle undulation of hills washed in the dun and yellow and red of autumn.
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Book 1 - November 30, 1864: Dawn: That day in 1864 was unseasonably mild for late November.
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…the smell of men overpowered me. My nose had no experience with such a smell. It could not parse its elements. The smell was heavy and sour and musty, and I took it to be the smell of that world which had been kept at bay by my house and my husband these many years.”
The newspapers were always on about how the best men of our country – and by that, they meant this new country of ours, these Confederate States of America – went off to fight and were lost forever. But what of the best of our women? How many lovely young women were sacrificed behind the plow in those years? Oh, I’m not saying that a woman oughtn’t guide a plow, although I shudder at the thought of my own incompetence at the reins. It’s not the plowing, you see; it’s the elimination of everything BUT plowing, the possibility that you could be anything BUT someone who walked behind a mule and gathered in the snap beans.
My breathing came harder and my face flushed, as it always did when I began to feel unmoored, or upon the discovery that there was yet another thing under the sun that I had not understood. Or both.
Those men were the chains that bound the living. They were the missing whose absence shackled the survivors in place, people afraid to move on for fear of being gone for their sudden return. They drew the living back to the war, back to that battlefield over and over and over again, reenacting its rituals and its skirmishes until they all would be dead. … They will have to come to Carnton. They’ll be safe there. I will mourn them if no one else will.
Someone had to do it, to be that person. I was the woman they wrote the letters to; this house was the last address of the war. Now it was the final resting place of the dead, or at least almost 1,500 of them, and they could not be left alone. I had resolved to remember so others could forget. In the forgetting, I prayed, would be some relief, some respite from the violence and bitterness and vengeance.
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A story based on the true experiences of a Civil War heroine finds Carrie McGavock witnessing the bloodshed of the Battle of Franklin, falling in love with a wounded man, and dedicating her home as a burial site for fallen soldiers.

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