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Prometheus Bound (New York Review Books…
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Prometheus Bound (New York Review Books Classics) (edição: 2015)

de Aeschylus (Autor), Joel Agee (Tradutor), Joel Agee (Introdução)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0221714,802 (3.95)26
The myth of fire stolen from the gods appears in many pre-industrial societies. In Greek culture Prometheus the fire-stealer figures prominently in the poems of Hesiod, but in Prometheus Bound Hesiod's morality tale has been transformed into a drama of tragic tone and proportions. In the introduction, Mark Griffith examines how the dramatist has achieved this transformation, looking at the play from all angles - plot and characters, dramatic technique, style and metre. He includes a short section on the production of the play and on the questions of authenticity and date. The commentary guides the reader through problems of language, metre and content. An important feature of this volume is the appendix, which gathers together the existing fragments of the other two plays in the supposed Prometheus trilogy, quoting them in full in the original language and in translation, with short accompanying commentary. This is suitable for undergraduates and students in the upper forms of schools. It also deserves the serious attention of scholars. The introduction requires no knowledge of Greek and will interest students of drama and literature in other cultures too.… (mais)
Membro:parakleet
Título:Prometheus Bound (New York Review Books Classics)
Autores:Aeschylus (Autor)
Outros autores:Joel Agee (Tradutor), Joel Agee (Introdução)
Informação:NYRB Classics (2015), Edition: Reprint, 100 pages
Coleções:Other
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Prometheus Bound de Aeschylus

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    The Myth of Sisyphus de Albert Camus (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Reading Aeschylus's play through the lens of Camus's interpretation of the absurd hero is interesting.
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Inglês (15)  Holandês (1)  Sueco (1)  Todos os idiomas (17)
Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This is probably the best and most classic telling of Prometheus, from his giving fire to man from the noblest of reasons to how horribly and seemingly unjustly that Zeus punishes him.

All arts and tools come from Prometheus, after all, and he should always be considered the greatest of all friends of mankind even though he is a titan.

However, he's also the one that pushed us to improve our intellect in the same way he did for himself, and in doing so, he brought harm upon himself. See a trend? We created war with the smelting of ore into weapons, after all. It's not all about cooking and keeping warm or creating medicine.

Was Zeus right? Was it right to keep an immortal chained and have a bird eat his liver for all eternity? Or was this just the graphic depiction of what we will always do to ourselves?

I wish I could read the other two parts of this play. I think that would be awesome. :) But alas. What we've got is still pretty raw and emotional and delightfully slanted. After all, we're meant to sympathize entirely with Prometheus throughout the play.

It reminds me an awful lot of Paradise Lost. :) Good motivations and charismatic leaders leading to roads paved to hell. :)
( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
An amazing play. This is a recommended read for anyone interested in classics, ancient Greek literature, and drama. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 24, 2018 |
Vid en klippa i Skytien fängslas han, vid en orubblig sten naglas han fast. Gudasmidda band håller honom, Hefaistos kedjor stannar hans flykt. Eldgivaren straffas, Zeus fiende plågas.

Aischylos Den fjättrade Prometheus är en lite udda pjäs: jag vet inte om den egentligen bör kallas tragedi, trots att Prometheus när den är över kommer att stå fjättrad vid sin klippa i tretton generationer innan Herakles befriar honom: för det är han för okuvligt stolt, för trotsig i nederlaget.

Som alla grekiska pjäser drivs denna främst av dialog, förutom mellan Prometheus och Hefaistos när han låses vid klippan, övervakade av Zaus hantlangare Makt, så mellan Prometheus och kören, som är en samling avkomlingar till Okeanos, och mellan Prometheus och den irrande Io, som han pekar ut vägen till Egypten för. Man förstår att Zeus nyss tagit makten, att Prometheus hjälpt honom, och att han sedan hjälpt människorna ut ur oförståndet, mot civilisationen: det är detta som fått Zeus att ana en utmaning och störta honom. Prometheus sitter dock fortfarande med ett trumf: han har sett en dumhet som Zeus är på väg att begå, vet att den kan leda till hans fall.

Den fjättrade Prometheus är långt ifrån den bästa antika pjäs jag läst: den innehåller en del intressant, men ingen riktig lyftning. Den stolthet i nederlaget som Prometheus uppvisar må vara grundad, men leder inte till någon större rörelse. ( )
  andejons | Oct 13, 2016 |
41. Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, translated by Paul Roche
1st performed: c ~456 bce ?? (alternately 430 bce, authored by Aeschylus' son, Euphorion)
format: 128 page Paperback - 1964 Mentor Classic
acquired: unknown. It comes from my childhood home. Perhaps one of my parents used it in high school or college.
read: July 2-3
rating: 4

I read this recently with a different translator. That review includes a brief summary. See HERE.

As far as I can tell, Paul Roche is a pretty obscure translator. I thought he created something really nice, keeping the poetry and recreating the rhythms. It's not as clean as David Grene, Robert Fitzgerald etc, and it's not as poetic as Philip Vellacott, but it is somewhere between these two. It's easily readable, but also provides noticeable poetic feel. Roche includes an introduction and various thoughts afterward in the format of questions and answers. I found the introduction particularly interesting as he talks about his struggle to translate this. He had translated about half the play unhappily. He studied the translation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, then went back to the Greek and noticed how clean the line endings were. Based on this, he re-worked the translation over again, trying to focus on clean line endings, with the rhyme, alliteration, assonance etc similar to the original. He even diagrams a few examples. No easy thing this, and very interesting to read about in brief, as he has it.

As far as re-reading the play itself, I'm struck first by Prometheus's character. Pinned to a rock the entire play, literally just hanging there, everything hinges on what he says and how he says it. He is an elegant stoic, in the modern sense, never losing his composure regardless of the pain and the endlessness of it all. He also makes Zeus, who condemned him, out to be an absolute tyrant, in the sense of, say, a Persian emperor. Zeus can do as he pleases and command endless torture for any frivolous reason, and there is no one even to complain to. It's a clear political point. (Critics have felt the negative light he writes of Zeus is inconsistent with his other works. Some have tried to give the play to other authors.)

2016
https://www.librarything.com/topic/220674#5642886 ( )
1 vote dchaikin | Jul 4, 2016 |
I can see Prometheus Bound serving as an excellent first play in a trilogy, but unfortunately any sequels to this work have been lost to the sands of time. As a standalone work Prometheus Bound has some fascinating characteristics, but spends so much time on long monologues of exposition and establishing conflicts that never come to fruition that it doesn't succeed in isolation.

As the title would suggest the titan Prometheus takes center stage in this play, the work opening after he has already disobeyed Zeus and given fire (and with it the arts and sciences) to humanity. Prometheus did this knowing full well that he would be punished for it, tortured in fact, but he accepts this fate in order to save mankind. When he is being chained and nailed to the mountainside it's impossible not to note the parallels between the figure of Prometheus and that of Jesus Christ, but while the suffering to redeem others is the same, no third day ascendance is at hand for Prometheus. Likewise, though Prometheus has taken action knowing what fate would result, he does not accept such punishment as did Christ. Prometheus is not going quietly into the night, nor is he a humble figure, but instead he continues to struggle against the injustice that has been done to him and refuses to bow down to the perpetrator of that injustice, despite acknowledging the superior power of Zeus. While Christ acted in accordance with God's wishes and suffered at the hands of those he sought to redeem, Prometheus went against Zeus for the sake of mankind, and suffers at the hands of Zeus because of it. Prometheus is, in short, a fascinating character, the very embodiment of the idea that tyranny should never be bowed to, but always struggled against. He is prideful, to be sure, but is being humble the correct response to injustice?

The other focus of the play is the newly enthroned Zeus, a character who never appears within the text of the play but who nevertheless influences every part of it. Through Prometheus, the chorus, Io, and Hermes the messenger, Aeschylus paints a dictatorial Zeus that has already begun to abuse his power. Zeus lords over both gods and man, taking what he wants and threatening to crush any opposition. He is a powerful God, but far from just, the only character who seems to conflate the two being Hermes his messenger. Of Zeus' newfound power Prometheus states that there "is a sickness, it seems, that goes along with dictatorship-inability to trust one's friends." A lesson still worth knowing now, over 2,400 years after the play was written. Like Prometheus is a fascinating character for resisting tyranny, Zeus is a fascinating character to look to for the descent into tyranny and the corrupting influence of power. He is not just powerful, but the ultimate power in the universe, and while there is the well known adage that "absolute power corrupts absolutely," Zeus' position at the head of the pantheon means that he will have to be dealt with before Prometheus is to be freed, and force is not an option.

In a scant forty pages Aeschylus establishes two fascinating characters (one of which doesn't even appear in person) and sets up a fascinating dynamic between the two. Unfortunately, that is all he does with this piece. The next two plays, if they existed, might have brought to fruition all of the potential this play contains, and if that had occurred then the Prometheus Cycle would have eclipsed the Oresteia and become a centerpiece of classical study. As it stands, however, all we have left is this introductory piece, with all the threads left dangling. We have lost whatever other parts of the cycle existed, and are left to wonder what might have been.
  BayardUS | Dec 10, 2014 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (121 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Aeschylusautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Bottoni, GerolamoEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Burke, Marjorie L.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Droysen, Johann GustavTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Groeneboom, P.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lowell, RobertTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Roche, PaulTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stolpe, JanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Svensson, Lars-HåkanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thomson, George DerwentTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Torné i Teixidó, RamonTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Weissman, AlanEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Tragedias de Aischylos (indireta)

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for KIUMON FRIAR
homage with the great tradition
(Let any greeks here enter in by lot
according to the law,
and I shall prophesy as the god leads on.)
-The Eumenides 31-33

Slices from Homer's mighty dinners
(Aeschylus, of his own works: Athenaeus 8.347e)
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This is the world's limit that we have come to; this is the Scythian country, an untrodden desolation. - (tr. Grene, 1942)
We've come to the end, then--the world's end:
This Scythian tract, a desert without men.,
[Tr. Paul Roche, 1964]
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This is for translated versions of Prometheus Bound, not the original greek.
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The myth of fire stolen from the gods appears in many pre-industrial societies. In Greek culture Prometheus the fire-stealer figures prominently in the poems of Hesiod, but in Prometheus Bound Hesiod's morality tale has been transformed into a drama of tragic tone and proportions. In the introduction, Mark Griffith examines how the dramatist has achieved this transformation, looking at the play from all angles - plot and characters, dramatic technique, style and metre. He includes a short section on the production of the play and on the questions of authenticity and date. The commentary guides the reader through problems of language, metre and content. An important feature of this volume is the appendix, which gathers together the existing fragments of the other two plays in the supposed Prometheus trilogy, quoting them in full in the original language and in translation, with short accompanying commentary. This is suitable for undergraduates and students in the upper forms of schools. It also deserves the serious attention of scholars. The introduction requires no knowledge of Greek and will interest students of drama and literature in other cultures too.

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