Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Complete Polysyllabic Spree

de Nick Hornby

Séries: Believer Columns (1-2)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
521934,684 (3.7)30
"The Complete Polysyllabic Spree is a full collection of Nick Hornby's 'Stuff I've Been Reading' essays, first published in the Believer magazine in the US, and now assembled in this bumper volume for the delectation and edification of book lovers everywhere." "Through twenty-eight monthly accounts of books bought and books read, Nick Hornby explores the how and when and why and what of reading. From classic midlife crisis ('OK, I should have read David Cooperfield before, and therefore deserve to be punished...') to the realization that his lovely, highbrow friends rarely recommend books that have him bumping into lamp-posts, Hornby does battle with the big literary biography (613 pages long - 'Have mercy!'), pursues newly discovered writers to the outermost reaches of their oeuvres, instructs the young Flaubert to get a life, forgets every book he's ever read, and explains the theory behind literary family trees - the way great books give birth to one another." "A testament to the joy and surprise and despair that books bring, The Complete Polysyllabic Spree covers debuts, blockbusters, poems and comics, self-help ('how to stop smoking and stay stopped for good'), sports biographies and literary letters, classics and science (read through panicked tears). Hornby is the perfect guide to this cornucopia of books, engaging the reader with wonderful conversation pieces, hilarious one-liners, lists, ideas, admissions and autobiography. He introduces the magnificent concept of a Cultural Fantasy Boxing League. And includes bonus material - excerpts from works by Chekhov, Charles Dickens, Patrick Hamilton, and many more."--BOOK JACKET.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 30 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Can you give a book half a star? I would if I could. Nick Hornby is English so why try writing American? ( )
  adrianburke | Dec 28, 2017 |
The moment I'd finished I bought myself a first edition, and then another, for a friend's birthday. It's that sort of book. I'll tell you how much I liked it: one paragraph in the story 'When She Is Old and I Am Famous' contained the words 'gowns', 'pumps', 'diva hairdos', 'pink chiffon', ' silk roses', 'couture' and 'Vogue', and, after the briefest shudder, I read on anyway.

A really enjoyable collection of Nick Hornby's humorous Stuff I've Been Reading columns from The Believer (an American magazine), which was made even better for me by the fact that the isn't much overlap in our reading tastes, so I only had to add three authors to my wish list. My local library system has several books by Jess Walter and Marilynne Robinson so I can try them both out, but they don't have any of Patrick Hamilton's novels (although they do have several of his plays).

For the June/July 2005 column, Nick Hornby decided he should try something different, and chose "Excession", which I wouldn't recommend as an introduction to the Culture let alone as someone's first ever science fiction book, and unsurprisingly he abandoned the entire ill-conceived experiment altogether when faced with the ship to ship conversation in Chapter 1. But where we do overlap is with "Into the Wild", "Death and the Penguin", which he read reluctantly but ended up liking, saying that the penguin is a masterly creation, and "Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction", which he was only lukewarm about. ( )
1 vote isabelx | Jul 5, 2015 |
While Nick Hornby is best known for his fiction that includes books like High Fidelity and About a Boy, some maybe familiar with his column in The Believer called Stuff I’ve Been Reading. The Complete Polysyllabic Spree is the combination of two U.S. titles from his column, The Polysyllabic Spree and Housekeeping vs. the Dirt. The title is a reference to the Dallas choral rock band The Polyphonic Spree, a group with over twenty members in it. Hornby often describes the works of The Believer in this way; “all dressed in white robes and smiling maniacally, sort of like a literary equivalent of The Polyphonic Spree.”

In fact, The Believer is a literary magazine created by Dave Eggers and part of the McSweeney’s company; it also focuses on other forms of the arts and general culture. It started in 2003 and releases nine issues a year; this book takes Hornsby’s column from September 2003 to mid-2006. Each article follows the same basic format, first listing books he bought that month, and then the books he read. However due to The Believers guidelines all books he hated must be listed as untitled. This is followed by an essay talking about these books and future reading plans, often between 500 to 2000 words.

What I thought was interesting is the fact that Nick Hornby took a very simple formula and worked within the confines of it successfully. As stated in a previous What I Think about When I’m Not Blogging post, this has inspired me to write more personal essays. However I have to say, I was a little disappointed by this book, simply because he kept to the same formula and never grew or evolved as a reader or writer. I like the idea but I would have liked to see some growth or experimentation; I also think if you don’t mention the books you don’t like can’t really give a true representation of your reading life, but I do understand their policy.

I have to also mention that Nick Hornby has a strong aversion to literary fiction and will actively poke at it. The idea that people only read literary fiction to become literary snobs felt a little off colour; I embrace my pretentious nature but I read literary fiction because I love the proses. His reading tastes are very narrow and focus mainly on popular fiction; this type of article would be far more interesting if the writer was interested in exploring all types of literature. I am fascinated by books about books and learning about someone’s reading journey but this was like watching someone run in the same spot. There was no risk-taking and no changes from article to article; to make matters worse I did not add a single book to my TBR as a result of reading this.

This review originally appeared on my blog: http://literary-exploration.com/2014/11/27/the-complete-polysyllabic-spree-by-ni... ( )
  knowledge_lost | Nov 27, 2014 |
"This is not a book of reviews. This is not a book that sneers at other books. This is a book about enjoying books wherever and however you find them. Nick Hornby is first and foremost a reader and he approaches books like the rest of us: hoping to pick up one he can´t put down. The complete polysillabic spree is a diary or sorts, charting his reading life over two years. It is a celebration of why we read -its pleasures, its celebration disappointments and its surprises. And above all, it is for you- the ever hopeful reader."
(edit. promo)

En este libro, Nick Hornby (Alta fidelidad, Fiebre en las gradas) nos presenta una serie de artículos sobre los libros que ha leído ese mes entre los que, de vez en cuando, intercala capítulos de obras que considera interesantes en su momento (hay hasta un poco de cómic con el Persépolis de Satrapi)

Al final no sabes si lo dice de coña o es verdad, pero parece que esta serie de artículos mensuales (aunque se salta algunos meses aduciendo problemas de criterios con los del Polysillabic Spree) salieron publicados en una revista literaria que se llamaría (siempre según él) The Believer. En ellos nos va describiendo un poco lo que ha leído ese mes y el libro es curioso porque no se trata de reseñas sobre las obras, sino de las impresiones que le producen. De hecho, sus lecturas no resultan ser más que meras excusas para que el pavo se ponga a reflexionar y nos suelte sus paranoias (a razón de una mensual, salen unas cuantas cuando abarcas un par de años)

Me gusta mucho la intro que hace para explicar su punto de vista sobre la lectura. Para él, leer debería ser una actividad de ocio, con sus competidores en las otras propuestas de ocio (cine, tele, deportes (es un forofo del fútbol que te cagas)) no en las otras formas de conocimiento, por lo que habría que promover sobre todo los goces que proporciona, más que sus supuestos beneficios culturizadores. Vamos, un poco como le digo yo a la peña: si el libro no te engancha en las primeras cincuenta páginas o así, déjalo porque lo único que vas a conseguir es pillarle más paquete. (lo que el argumenta es "como si cambiaras de canal con el mando si estuvieras viendo la tele")

Y es que siempre se asocia lo literario a un estatus de cultura o de saber que, a veces, perjudica la posibilidad de aproximarse a lo escrito y que oculta la dimensión lúdica de la lectura.

Serás mucho más inteligente si lees obras consideradas canónicas? (y a todo ésto, quién las hace canónicas). Para Hornby, en los grandes libros pasa como con los iPod, se ha invertido un montón de inteligencia en su creación, pero la inteligencia no es transferible.

Detalle: El autor descubre en esta época de su vida a Marah en un conciertillo de taberna y flipa tanto con ellos que se pone a leer las obras de Patrick Hamilton (el autor de "20,000 strets under the sky" por si el título os suena de algo) ( )
  Txikito | Oct 9, 2008 |
Jolly good read. Hornby reads his way through a few books each month and writes a review for a magazine, "The Believer", which only wants good things said about the books. This should be taken with a pinch of salt.

I found it quite amazing how many of the books which Hornby bought/read I had never even heard of. I also found myself noting down some books for my wishlist which, recommended by any other reviewer, I probably would have baulked at. It helped that I recently read & liked the author's "A Long Way Down"; I felt that I wanted to read the books he liked.

It was amusing to see him attempt an Iain M Banks Culture novel - his description of the first few pages pretty much encapsulate what I feel about such books - although I love Iain's non-M Banks novels. (And yes, if you look at my library, I have several Iain M Banks books. One is mine, unread. The rest are my partner's. Maybe one day I'll read one...) ( )
  sandpiper | Sep 3, 2007 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my wife
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
I began writing this column in the summer of 2003.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
‘The Complete Polysyllabic Spree’ is a British edition that contains both ‘The Polysyllabic Spree’ and ‘Housekeeping vs The Dirt’, which were previously only available in North America.

It should therefore not be combined with ‘The Polysyllabic Spree’.
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"The Complete Polysyllabic Spree is a full collection of Nick Hornby's 'Stuff I've Been Reading' essays, first published in the Believer magazine in the US, and now assembled in this bumper volume for the delectation and edification of book lovers everywhere." "Through twenty-eight monthly accounts of books bought and books read, Nick Hornby explores the how and when and why and what of reading. From classic midlife crisis ('OK, I should have read David Cooperfield before, and therefore deserve to be punished...') to the realization that his lovely, highbrow friends rarely recommend books that have him bumping into lamp-posts, Hornby does battle with the big literary biography (613 pages long - 'Have mercy!'), pursues newly discovered writers to the outermost reaches of their oeuvres, instructs the young Flaubert to get a life, forgets every book he's ever read, and explains the theory behind literary family trees - the way great books give birth to one another." "A testament to the joy and surprise and despair that books bring, The Complete Polysyllabic Spree covers debuts, blockbusters, poems and comics, self-help ('how to stop smoking and stay stopped for good'), sports biographies and literary letters, classics and science (read through panicked tears). Hornby is the perfect guide to this cornucopia of books, engaging the reader with wonderful conversation pieces, hilarious one-liners, lists, ideas, admissions and autobiography. He introduces the magnificent concept of a Cultural Fantasy Boxing League. And includes bonus material - excerpts from works by Chekhov, Charles Dickens, Patrick Hamilton, and many more."--BOOK JACKET.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.7)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 9
2.5 6
3 27
3.5 16
4 52
4.5 8
5 21

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,715,070 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível