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The Shadow of the Sun de Ryszard Kapuscinski
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The Shadow of the Sun (original: 1998; edição: 2002)

de Ryszard Kapuscinski (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,099527,847 (4.23)82
In 1957, Ryszard Kapuscinski arrived in Africa to witness the beginning of the end of colonial rule as the first African correspondent of Poland's state newspaper. From the early days of independence in Ghana to the ongoing ethnic genocide in Rwanda, Kapuscinski has crisscrossed vast distances pursuing the swift, and often violent, events that followed liberation. Kapuscinski hitchhikes with caravans, wanders the Sahara with nomads, and lives in the poverty-stricken slums of Nigeria. He wrestles a king cobra to the death and suffers through a bout of malaria. What emerges is an extraordinary depiction of Africa--not as a group of nations or geographic locations--but as a vibrant and frequently joyous montage of peoples, cultures, and encounters. Kapuscinski's trenchant observations, wry analysis and overwhelming humanity paint a remarkable portrait of the continent and its people. His unorthodox approach and profound respect for the people he meets challenge conventional understandings of the modern problems faced by Africa at the dawn of the twenty-first century.… (mais)
Membro:Rakketytam
Título:The Shadow of the Sun
Autores:Ryszard Kapuscinski (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2002), Edition: Reprint, 325 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

Ébano : minha vida na África de Ryszard KAPUŚCIŃSKI (Author) (1998)

Adicionado recentemente porAdarsh90, Goyave, birkoxholm, bmcbook, arthurterhofstede, kadlib, biblioteca privada, bryce.kuykendall, jchchiu, DKON
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» Veja também 82 menções

Inglês (40)  Espanhol (5)  Italiano (3)  Francês (2)  Holandês (1)  Grego (1)  Todos os idiomas (52)
Mostrando 1-5 de 52 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Excelente recopilación de artículos y relatos de los viajes del autor por África. Incluye referencias a la historia reciente de este continente, muchas de ellas sorprendentes y, a veces, poco conocidas. Deja también algunas reflexiones muy interesantes. Está narrado de una forma muy amena, pareciendo en muchos momentos casi una novela. Muy recomendable. ( )
  mauromdc | Jun 25, 2024 |
Appassionante quanto drammatico affresco di un mondo lontano, immenso, tormentato, eppure meraviglioso: l'Africa.
Kapuscinsky ha conosciuto, ha amato l'Africa, e si percepisce fin dalla prima pagina. ( )
  BiblioCdSPG | Jun 5, 2024 |
The marriage of a persistent stream of lucid writing with flashes of genuine insight makes Ryszard Kapuściński's The Shadow of the Sun a treat, and one of the more original travel books I have read. Many travel books – particularly those about Africa – can't resist a sort of fawning orientalism, a fetishization of the 'dark continent' that presents it either as a hellish wasteland of rape and war or a vibrant, drum-playing kumbaya that puts the stolid West to shame. Perhaps Kapuściński is too worldly-wise, or too good a writer for untruths to survive in his prose, but The Shadow of the Sun manages to resist the allure of these fetishes and is bracingly realistic about Africa.

Kapuściński maintains a good balance between the two extremes. He can wax lyrical about the continent's treasures, but doesn't shy away from its poisons either; nowhere is this better shown than in the chapter on Rwanda (pp165-82), which remarks upon the beauty of the Rwandan mountains (pg. 170) but also gives an excellent summary of the tribal animosities that led to the appalling Rwandan genocide. And while Kapuściński is willing to discuss the very real effects of colonialism on the continent, he does not fall into the self-hating Western panacea of blaming all of Africa's problems on the white man's predation. The freed African-American slaves who returned to found Liberia established a caste system which enslaved the natives. The mountainous Rwanda, he notes, was largely untouched by the 18th- and 19th-century slave trade which impacted the plains societies; the murderous rancour between Hutu and Tutsi was something they generated themselves.

Kapuściński eulogises the immediate colours of the African dawn, but is also unperturbed about documenting some of the societies' self-defeating behaviours – for example, the unpaid airport staff who make their money from corruption, and so steal Kapuściński's travel documents upon arrival so he must buy them back from them (pg. 236). Another good example of this is the following observation: "If a tree trunk falls across the road, it will not be removed; people will go around it, onto the adjoining field, and eventually beat out a new road" (pg. 259). Endurance and a stoical determination, but also a short-termism that ensures the future will ultimately have the same unresolved problems as the present.

For all the criticism of Kapuściński that he may have invented or embellished certain stories, on a more fundamental level of writing he refuses to editorialise. The willingness to people his book with the idle "gapers of the world" (pg. 138) as well as with industrious and philosophical Africans gives you a sense of Africa that, you suspect, is a closer approximation of the truth. In one of his most astute observations in the book, he notes that when cultures meet it is not always in the best of circumstances, and "first contacts… were most frequently carried out by the worst sorts of people: robbers, soldiers of fortune, adventurers, criminals, slave traders". Such encounters set the tone, and naturally "respect for other cultures, a desire to learn about them, to find a common language, were the furthest things from the minds of such folk" (pg. 321). Kapuściński laments that this "cultural monopoly of crude know-nothings" (pg. 322) has had such a deep and destructive impact on our world but, in spending his own thoughtful words on the matter in The Shadow of the Sun, he has done what he can to try to break that monopoly. ( )
  MikeFutcher | Dec 7, 2022 |
This is an outstanding book. I wholly endorse what is says on the back cover of my edition: "... encompasses forty years of incisive and moving reportage about Africa by one of the world's greatest journalists. ... [the author] captures the sights, sounds, smells and, above all, the real lives of this vast continent. Poetic and profound, this dazzling travelogue has been acclaimed as one of the most significant works on Africa." ( )
  lestermay | Oct 18, 2022 |
Clave para entender algo de Africa. El cuento sobre los leones y los esclavos es increíble. ( )
  Alvaritogn | Jul 1, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 52 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
As literature, “The Shadow of the Sun” is in its way magnificent. As analysis, it can be strange. Mr Kapuscinski's account of Idi Amin's rule is inaccurate and his history of Rwanda is botched. Mysteriously, he travels from Djibouti to Gondar by way of Ndjamena: two sides of a huge triangle. Mr Kapuscinski tells it as it felt, rather than as it was, describing—sometimes, it seems, distastefully relishing—whatever is bizarre, humiliating, disgusting, exotic.
adicionado por Serviette | editarThe Economist (Jun 28, 2001)
 
The word 'reportage' appears twice in the jacket endorsements of this fine narrative study of African events and people, of African conditions and geography, by Ryszard Kapuscinski. According to John le Carré, Kapuscinski is the 'conjurer extraordinary of modern reportage'. According to Michael Ignatieff, who is no slouch in the same department, he has raised reportage 'to the status of literature'.
adicionado por Serviette | editarThe Guardian, Ian Jack (Jun 3, 2001)
 
He is lyrically succinct - in the stupor of noon a village was "like a submarine at the bottom of the ocean: it was there, but it emitted no signals, soundless, motionless" - and often hysterically funny.
adicionado por mikeg2 | editarThe Guardian, Geoff Dyer (Jun 2, 2001)
 
Ryszard Kapuscinski has led an extraordinary life. Born in 1932 in the marshlands of eastern Poland and raised in poverty, he became, in the 1950's, Poland's most celebrated foreign correspondent. For decades he roamed the globe on a laughably tight budget, living mostly in Africa, Asia and Latin America, filing stories for the Polish press agency PAP. It was a hairy beat. According to his American publisher, Kapuscinski ''witnessed 27 coups and revolutions; and was sentenced to death four times.''
adicionado por Serviette | editarThe New Yorker, William Finnegan (May 27, 2001)
 
Mr. Kapuscinski never loses his affection for the people whose lives he witnesses or his awe at the magnificence of the African spectacle, its oceanic size and variety, the beauty of its landscapes, the heavy weight of its patience and its spirituality. But as the vignettes roll on one after the other, Africa, in Mr. Kapuscinski's version of it, becomes ever more afflicted, more of a disaster. We do not learn in this book what happened in Ghana after the first hopeful years, or what became of Mr. Baako, but in his fragmentary, episodic way, Mr. Kapuscinski shows a continent sliding into governmental gangsterism, dependence on foreign aid, murderous tyrannies and urban populations with nothing to do.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (18 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
KAPUŚCIŃSKI, RyszardAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
幸雄, 工藤Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
CHMIELIK, TomaszTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Glowczewska, KlaraTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mansberger Amorós, RobertoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Orzeszek, AgataTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pollack, MartinTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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In 1957, Ryszard Kapuscinski arrived in Africa to witness the beginning of the end of colonial rule as the first African correspondent of Poland's state newspaper. From the early days of independence in Ghana to the ongoing ethnic genocide in Rwanda, Kapuscinski has crisscrossed vast distances pursuing the swift, and often violent, events that followed liberation. Kapuscinski hitchhikes with caravans, wanders the Sahara with nomads, and lives in the poverty-stricken slums of Nigeria. He wrestles a king cobra to the death and suffers through a bout of malaria. What emerges is an extraordinary depiction of Africa--not as a group of nations or geographic locations--but as a vibrant and frequently joyous montage of peoples, cultures, and encounters. Kapuscinski's trenchant observations, wry analysis and overwhelming humanity paint a remarkable portrait of the continent and its people. His unorthodox approach and profound respect for the people he meets challenge conventional understandings of the modern problems faced by Africa at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

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