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Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind…
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Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life (edição: 2006)

de Martin E. P. Seligman (Autor)

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1,455189,488 (3.84)16
Known as the father of the new science of positive psychology, Martin E.P. Seligman draws on more than twenty years of clinical research to demonstrate how optimism enchances the quality of life, and how anyone can learn to practice it. Offering many simple techniques, Dr. Seligman explains how to break an “I—give-up” habit, develop a more constructive explanatory style for interpreting your behavior, and experience the benefits of a more positive interior dialogue. These skills can help break up depression, boost your immune system, better develop your potential, and make you happier.. With generous additional advice on how to encourage optimistic behavior at school, at work and in children,Learned Optimismis both profound and practical–and valuable for every phase of life. From the Trade Paperback edition.… (mais)
Membro:NCVW
Título:Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life
Autores:Martin E. P. Seligman (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2006), Edition: Reprint, 319 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life de Martin E. P. Seligman

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A lot of this book is about how to identify if you are pessimistic, or if your children are depressed (despite the fact the author says it's impossible for children to be depressed). It's a lot of filler with not much actionable or theoretical content. ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
It’s gotten old. ( )
  joyfulmimi | Aug 22, 2020 |
not permanent, pervasive and personal. ( )
  Wendy_Wang | Sep 28, 2019 |
Published in 1990, Learned Optimism warned of an epidemic increase in depressive mental illness. A quick Google search suggests that the epidemic continues to increase, at least in western industrialised cultures. Seligman provides a half-baked evolutionary explanation for this modern plague. Depressive mental illness, in those who suffer from the condition, correlates with pessimism. When human existence was nasty brutal and short, pessimism served us well. Pessimists, to give them their due, usually have a more secure hold on reality than optimists. Seligman speculates that our ancestors, who ‘survived the Pleistocene may have done so because they had the capacity to worry incessantly about the future’. Now it is different. The enormous expansion of human freedoms and choices in modern societies encourages a deleterious tendency to inward reflection and insecurity about our extended sense of self, the ‘maximal self’ in Seligman’s terminology. He argues that pessimism, when allied with a ‘ruminant’ style of thinking, can quickly lead to depressive mental illness. Women, who are far more likely to explore their feelings, are in consequence far more likely than men to suffer depression. This is a crude and brutal theorisation of depression and its origins but perhaps one should not expect more sophistication or nuance in discussion of a self help manual. Seligman provides a self diagnostic quiz to enable his readers to locate themselves on various scales of pessimism, optimism and depression.

Fortunately, Seligman avers, there are two cures for the debilitating scourge of pessimism and its depressive sequel. The first is the cultivation of habits of thought that Seligman calls ‘learned optimism’. Surveys suggest that optimists live longer, happier, healthier and more successful lives than pessimists. Learned Optimism provides drills and exercises to exorcise debilitating pessimism. It is quite possible that Seligman is correct in his prescription, though more recent research does not seem to support his hopes that optimism cures cancer.

Learned Optimism concludes with a more visionary alternative cure for epidemic depression. Reduce our endemic preoccupation with the maximal self, Seligman suggests and learn altruism instead. He calls it ‘moral jogging’. The triteness of the slogan grates, but it masks an inspiring programme of self transformation. Here are some of his prescriptions: give generously to charity, but make it personal. When asked by a homeless person for money, stop and talk to the supplicant. Then give generously and with discrimination, according to need. Set aside a fund of 5% of your taxable income, invite applications for benefits and interview the applicants, selecting those who are most deserving of your help. Give an evening a week to community activities. Visit and comfort those who are dying of AIDS. (Seligman is writing in the last decades of the 20th century, when AIDS was often a death sentence for young men.) Devote three hours a week to actively promoting, by letters, meetings or personal solicitation, necessary social reforms. Twelve hours a week, or thereabouts, spent in altruistic activity can be a cure for excessive self-absorption, pessimism and a preventive against sliding into depressive mental illness.

Seligman’s promotion of a more altruistic society should be remembered to his credit, in contrast to the repellent cruelty of his earlier experimental work, teaching ‘learned helplessness’ to caged dogs. ( )
  Pauntley | Jun 25, 2019 |
"[The author], Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and past president of The American Psychological Association is a leading motivational expert and an authority on learned helplessness. He is the director of the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [He has written other books in this subject area]." Source: The book's pre-page.Dr. Aaron T. Beck, author of "Love Is Never Enough," said of this work, "Dr. Seligman makes an optimistic case for optimism; you can learn it, you can measure it, you can teach it, and you will be healthier and happier for it." This books is well-indexed.
  uufnn | Jun 17, 2019 |
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Learned Optimism is an important work in the self-help field because it provides a scientific foundation for many claims. The book is not simply about optimism but about the validity of personal change and the dynamic nature of the human condition.
adicionado por mikeg2 | editarCityWire, Tom Butler-Bowden (Apr 1, 2011)
 
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Known as the father of the new science of positive psychology, Martin E.P. Seligman draws on more than twenty years of clinical research to demonstrate how optimism enchances the quality of life, and how anyone can learn to practice it. Offering many simple techniques, Dr. Seligman explains how to break an “I—give-up” habit, develop a more constructive explanatory style for interpreting your behavior, and experience the benefits of a more positive interior dialogue. These skills can help break up depression, boost your immune system, better develop your potential, and make you happier.. With generous additional advice on how to encourage optimistic behavior at school, at work and in children,Learned Optimismis both profound and practical–and valuable for every phase of life. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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