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Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black…
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Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" (original: 2018; edição: 2020)

de Zora Neale Hurston (Autor), Deborah G. Plant (Introdução), Alice Walker (Prefácio)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0524814,711 (3.94)81
In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past--memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.--Publisher's website.… (mais)
Membro:Bibliofemmes
Título:Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"
Autores:Zora Neale Hurston (Autor)
Outros autores:Deborah G. Plant (Introdução), Alice Walker (Prefácio)
Informação:Amistad (2020), Edition: Reprint, 256 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:African American communities, slavery, slave trade

Detalhes da Obra

Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" de Zora Neale Hurston (2018)

Adicionado recentemente porhmt, gemmaduds, biblioteca privada, Josmine, GmaRuth, JamesBeach, Mahnogard, JCCooper
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Inglês (46)  Holandês (1)  Francês (1)  Todos os idiomas (48)
Mostrando 1-5 de 48 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Barracoon relates the story of Kossula – one of the last Black men to be sold into slavery from Africa to the United States. This biography is an interestingly formatted one, more a collection of afternoon conversations than a traditional biography. For the content of this biography, I think that style is perfect.

Kossula’s story is woven with his history, day-to-day, and stories. Some day, Hurston would barely converse with him at all which other days, Kossula easily shared his memories from Africa. His story includes pieces of his father’s and grandfather’s stories, building a brief generational record rather than one just of emotional experience.

Historical biographies can be complicated to record because it’s very easy for the recorder to insert themselves in the narrative. It can be challenging not to set these stories in the framework of our own personal belief and/or socially accepted fact. Hurston’s ability to separate herself from Kossula’s story, especially when his narrative differed from what she understood, is admirable. It also gives greater power to Kossula’s story itself.

Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” is short as for as biographies go. You won’t get the whole story from birth to the moment of telling. In fact, you’ll only get a few snapshots of his remarkable life. What stands out the most is the emotions he shares – grief, pain, love, and loneliness. The use of his original dialect and interjections add to this. According to the (extensive) foreword, Hurston fought to keep the dialect in and as a result this manuscript was not published until recently, posthumously. While it’s unfortunate it took this long for Kossula’s story to be heard in long-form, I agree with her push to capture his authentic voice.

Albeit short, Barracoon is a unique piece of historical significance, seeking to share the voice of a freed slave in a dialogue dominated by white men. It’s well worth a read to get a glimpse of the preserved culture and to better round your understanding of American slavery. ( )
  Morteana | Aug 21, 2021 |
I could have done without the preface by Deborah G. Plant, or at least I think it would have been better placed as an appendix. It’s a rather lengthy and scholarly analysis of the politics and significance of the work in the context of Hurston’s life, and so is more about Hurston than the book, although it reiterates (or rather, pre-iterates) a great deal of Cudjo’s history that he later tells in his own words.

As for Cudjo’s story, it covers a great deal more than just the Middle Passage, as you might surmise from the title. In fact, the parts of his story that left the greatest impression on me were the social and economic injustices that occurred after he was emancipated. ( )
  Charon07 | Jul 16, 2021 |
nonfiction (audiobook); oral history of former slave as recorded by Hurston in her earlier folklorist/historian days
cool to learn more about the author and how the book was rejected by publishers until its posthumous printing. The narrator [a:Robin Miles|158074|Robin Miles|https://s.gr-assets.com/assets/nophoto/user/u_50x66-632230dc9882b4352d753eedf9396530.png] does a great job bringing Cudjo's vernacular speech back to life. Though his story might not be as dramatic or heartrending or complete as other slave tales that have been told, it is interesting to learn what parts of his history Cudjo was willing to tell (he leaves out a lot) and nevertheless worth hearing. This is another book best read slowly--take your time with this book and let each of Cudjo's stories sit with you a while before starting the next chapter.

update: rereading as a print book--getting a lot more out of it. The audio version is well produced, especially given how Hurston fought to keep Cudjo's vernacular in the book--it's just that I can take in information better through print. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
I love his story and wish he had more to tell. ( )
  xKayx | Dec 14, 2020 |
Un livre témoignage, celui du dernier survivant du dernier navire négrier qui traversa l’Atlantique pour rejoindre les États du Sud. Cudjo Lewis, esclave libéré par la guerre de Sécession cinq ans plus tard et qui vécu jusqu’à l’âge 86 ans aux États-Unis

Un des rares témoignages de première main, sur sa capture par le peuple du Dahomey, son passage dans les Baraccoon, sa vente, le transport, son arrivée et sa vie en Amérique.

Un livre dont les atrocités sont atténuées par la douceur nostalgique de leur conteur. ( )
  noid.ch | Nov 8, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 48 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The book's uniqueness is in its recounting of a story in which we are all equally bound up by this cycle of oppression – the former slave plagued by the trauma of losing his homeland and family, the writer whose work survived the desire of intellectuals for white approval, the reader forced to challenge their own ideas about race and the internalisation of oppression. But more than anything it brings an African past up close to an African American present, at a time of great searching. "Throughout her life, Hurston fought against this idea that there was no connection to Africa once people arrived on these shores, and everything was forgotten," Wall says. "We know that's not true. But a book like this really brings that to life."
adicionado por Cynfelyn | editarThe Guardian, Afua Hirsch (May 26, 2018)
 
Brimming with observational detail from a man whose life spanned continents and eras, the story is at times devastating, but Hurston's success in bringing it to light is a marvel.
adicionado por Shortride | editarNPR, Jean Zimmerman (May 8, 2018)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Zora Neale Hurstonautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Lewis, CudjoIntervieweeautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Plant, Deborah G.Editorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Walker, AlicePrefácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Möhring, Hans-UlrichTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Miles, RobinNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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But the inescapable fact that stuck in my craw, was: my people had sold me and the white people had bought me.... It impressed upon me the universal nature of greed and glory.
--Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road
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This is the life story of Cudjo Lewis, as told by himself. (Preface)
It was summer when I went to talk with Cudjo so his door was standing wide open.
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In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past--memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.--Publisher's website.

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