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Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the…
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Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the Fiction, Now Read the Facts (edição: 2004)

de James Garlow

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The controversy grows with every sale of the bestselling novel. Throughout the contemporary fictional storyline of The Da Vinci Code, author Dan Brown skillfully weaves "historical" assertions intended to shake the very foundations of Christianity: - Was Jesus merely human and not divine? - Did Jesus and Mary Magdalene marry and have children? - Is there a Holy Grail? If so, what is it and where can it be found? CRACKING DA VINCI'S CODE is the long-awaited answer to these and other questions. Authors James L. Garlow and Peter Jones present compelling evidence that Brown's assertions are not only historically inaccurate, but may also contain a hidden agenda.… (mais)
Membro:bluestar50
Título:Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the Fiction, Now Read the Facts
Autores:James Garlow
Informação:Cook Communications (2004), Paperback
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:non-fiction

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Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the Fiction, Now Read the Facts de James Garlow

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'Cracking' is a rather obvious diatribe against 'The Da Vinci Code' by Dan Brown. What else should we expect from Anglican theologians? They say: "If ever a book should be written off as mere fiction, 'The Da Vinci Code' is the one." Hmm. And where does it say Dan Brown was trying to do anything else but write fiction?? Methinks thou dost protest too much!!
  Farree | Dec 17, 2014 |
I was given this book because I loved the whole Dan Brown Series. I ended up skimming through it. Everywhere I turned a page & let it drop open to read, more "facts" from the Bible were presented as to why it's not a true story. Basically it points out what everyone already knows. That the series is fiction. HELLO!!! What a revelation! Pardon the pun :) It points these things out by using Bible references, yada, yada. I find it VERY funny that 2 such learned men as the authors actually felt the need to write a refutation book like this. To me, it simply points out that they felt threatened by a series of books that were simply designed to be a great set of adventure stories. Even funnier, the Bible is also a great set of adventure stories, even if you don't believe that much of it's actually true. Now, from my perspective, I do think "parts" of it are true, there's enough archaeological evidence to prove certain things, but not enough to make me a believer in all of it without question, especially since what's IN those covers is incomplete, & what was thrown out was thrown out for socio-political reasons of the time. So that gives THIS book a lot less credibility in my mental book.

ANYWAY, I was pretty bored with it, it's a lot of needless repetition & rhetoric.

WHY can't people let a good story just be what it is? ( )
  Lisa.Johnson.James | Apr 11, 2014 |
Cracking Da Vinci's Code is by far the most illogical and least objective response to Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code that I have read. There is no question that, despite Brown's claim of historical accuracy, there are serious inconsistencies between Brown's interpretation of biblical and art literature vs. that of more scholarly authors. Unfortunately, Garlow and Jones present what is at best a knee-jerk reaction to what they perceive as a personal attack on Christianity. Every chapter begins and ends with inflammatory rhetorical questions that are in most cases given only cursory answers, and in some cases not even addressed at all. The authors consistently spend entire chapters setting up straw-men, and then end the chapters without even having outright attacked them. The implication is that certain elements of The Da Vinci Code (as Garlow and Jones have explained them) are so absurd that they need no direct refutation. This tactic might work on the uninitiated, however anyone who has spent any time in an academic setting will see right through it. To make matters worse, when Garlow and Jones do attempt to provide evidence to support their arguments, they throw all rules of logic out the window. For example, the authors address the accusation that the Church retaliated against anyone who appeared to question the 'natural order' and brought about the execution of women branded as witches. The authors admit that many women were executed as witches, but deny that the Church was attempting to hold on to its authority. Somehow Garlow and Jones offer this quote from Jenny Gibbons in refutation: "When the Church was at the height of its power (11th to 14th centuries) very few witches died. Persecutions did not reach epidemic levels until after the Reformation, when the Catholic church had lost its position as Europe's indisputable moral authority." Anyone even half paying attention should question how this passage could possibly disprove the idea that an insecure church was retaliating against what it saw as the greatest threat to its authority. In fact, that passage goes a long way the proving exactly what Garlow and Jones want to disprove. Moreover, this faulty logic seems to permeate every page, to the point that by the time I was halfway through, I realized I was reading just to see if a valid argument would be made at all. Sadly, I was disappointed.

In fairness, I'll admit that I thoroughly enjoyed The Da Vinci Code, though I take very little of it as a serious piece of literature - after all, it is fiction. However, as my library will attest, I own many other criticisms of Dan Brown's work and I can say with all honesty that there are far better books available for anyone that would like to explore the history and art of The Da Vinci Code. As an example of how strongly I feel about this, one should note that I have at this point been a paid member of library thing for more than 2 years, and this is so far the only work I have felt the need to review.

As an aside, I would like to point out that a highly positive review was written on Nov 13 2006 by an individual who admitted that she had never actually read The Da Vinci Code itself - and that is exactly the kind of person that Garlow and Jones are hoping will read Cracking Da Vinci's Code. ( )
  miketurner | May 4, 2009 |
I had two very dear people to me ask if the information in The DaVinci Code was true. After reading this book, I never intend to read the original. I think it would gag me. This whole "sacred feminine" thing makes me ill. I hate that people are getting caught up in paganism just as many in the world are being delivered from it! Anyway, this book offers plain fact and solid logic to refute the generalization and misleading "facts" of the other. For anyone who wants to know truth, this should help. ( )
  MrsLee | Nov 13, 2006 |
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Jones, PeterAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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Blinding ignorance does mislead us. O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes! Leonardo da Vinci
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Dedicated to the Women in our lives

- our Mothers who gave us life ... and love for God. Thank you.

- our Wives who love us and affirm us. We respect and love you. You are amazing.

- our Daughters who delight us. You are so much fun to be with.

James L. Garlow

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Everything you've ever learned about Jesus Christ is false.
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The controversy grows with every sale of the bestselling novel. Throughout the contemporary fictional storyline of The Da Vinci Code, author Dan Brown skillfully weaves "historical" assertions intended to shake the very foundations of Christianity: - Was Jesus merely human and not divine? - Did Jesus and Mary Magdalene marry and have children? - Is there a Holy Grail? If so, what is it and where can it be found? CRACKING DA VINCI'S CODE is the long-awaited answer to these and other questions. Authors James L. Garlow and Peter Jones present compelling evidence that Brown's assertions are not only historically inaccurate, but may also contain a hidden agenda.

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