Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Life Together: The Classic Exploration of…
Carregando...

Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian in Community (original: 1939; edição: 1978)

de Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5,489371,943 (4.17)15
After his martyrdom at the hands of the Gestapo in 1945, Dietrich Bonhoeffer continued his witness in the hearts of Christians around the world. His Letters and Papers from Prison became a prized testimony to Christian faith and courage, read by thousands. Now in Life Together there is Pastor Bonhoeffer's experience of Christian community. This story of a unique fellowship in an underground seminary during the Nazi years reads like one of Paul's letters. It gives practical advice on how life together in Christ can be sustained in families and groups. The role of personal prayer, worship in common, everyday work, and Christian service is treated in simple, almost biblical, words. Life Together is bread for all who are hungry for the real life of Christian fellowship.… (mais)
Membro:jciecka
Título:Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian in Community
Autores:Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Autor)
Informação:HarperOne (2009), Edition: 1, 128 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian in Community de Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1939)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 15 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
3.5 stars -- I didn't like this book as much as I thought I would, but there are still many good nuggets here.

The book is divided into only 5 chapters and is quite short. Despite this, it took me a while to get through it because there were so many parts I needed to stop and really think about. (Also, the older-English writing with thee's and thou's tossed in made it a bit wordy.) I did feel that the writing sometimes seemed a bit repetitive and could have been edited more.

I really liked chapters 1, 4, and 5 ("Community," "Ministry," and "Confession and Communion," respectively). I wrote down a lot of quotes from these chapters that I didn't want to forget!

One of my favorite quotes pertaining to Christian fellowship is found on page 27: "He who loves his dream of a community more than the Christian community itself becomes a destroyer of the latter, even though his personal intentions may be ever so honest and earnest and sacrificial." -- I see a lot of this "loving the dream more than the community" within the hipster movement, so it really stuck out to me.

Chapters 2 and 3 ("The Day with Others" and "The Day Alone," respectively) missed the mark a bit for me. I'm not quite sure which denomination Bonhoeffer is associated with, but I disagreed with many of his views on prayer (for example, he advocates very rigid, scheduled prayer times for various topics) as well as certain interactions between Christians. (He seems to believe that being a Christian means letting other believers walk all over you without holding them accountable, but not even Christ did that - He extends forgiveness, but we have to repent. Enabling others to sin is never the right course of action! I guess Bonhoeffer never read [b:Boundaries|944267|Boundaries When to Say Yes, How to Say No to Take Control of Your Life|Henry Cloud|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1348423991s/944267.jpg|1450035]. ;) ) ( )
  RachelRachelRachel | Nov 21, 2023 |
I have wanted to read this book for some time, but was left a bit disappointed. There were definitely things of good, which cannot be discounted. But all in all, the book wasn’t quite what I was expecting on the topic.

First, the good:

1. I appreciated the balance and excellent of the sections on solitude and silence when so many warn us to avoid silence:

“There is an indifferent, or even negative, attitude toward silence which sees in it a disparagement of God's revelation in the Word. This is the view which misinterprets silence is a ceremonial gesture, as a mystical desire to get beyond the Word. This is to miss the essential relationship of silence to the Word. Silence is the simple stillness of the individual under the Word of God. We are silent before hearing the Word because our thoughts are already directed to the Word, as a child is quiet when he enters his father's room. We are silent after hearing the Word because the Word is still speaking and dwelling within us.”

2. “It will happen again and again that the person who is charged with offering the prayer for the fellowship will not feel at all in the spiritual mood to do so, and will much prefer to turn over his task to another for this day. Such a shift is not advisable, however. Otherwise, the prayer of the fellowship will too easily be governed by moods which have nothing to do with spiritual life. It is precisely when a person, who is borne down by inner emptiness and weariness or a sense of personal unworthiness, feels that he would like to withdraw from his task, that he should learn what it means to have a duty to perform in the fellowship, and the brethren should support him in his weakness, in his inability to pray.”

3. This quote on personal intercession for another:

“I can no longer condemn or hate a brother for whom I pray, no matter how much trouble he causes me. . . There is no dislike, no personal tension, no estrangement that cannot be overcome by intercession as far as our side of it is concerned.”

4. The mention that psalms we ourselves cannot pray, “hint to us that here Someone else is praying, not we. . . none other than Jesus Christ Himself.”

The not so good: The writing is rather dry a lot of the time and not much citing of Scripture is given for his ideas.

It was concerning that he did not mention the importance of knowing the proper context of a Scripture passage when meditating on the Word, instead encouraging the individual to ponder what it personally says to us and for our own life. This isn’t inherently bad, but we need to be careful not to misinterpret a Scripture in wrong or harmful ways because we do not know its context. For example, it could lead someone to read into God calling Abraham to another location as God telling us to move if someone did not know the full narrative of the Bible as a whole.

Secondly, I cannot agree where he says there should only be unison/melody only singing in worship.

As a minister of music and someone who has studied music history, it’s important to remember how Bach and Handel composed their choral works intentionally to the glory of God, such as Handel’s Messiah complete with full harmonies telling of Christ. Music in worship can be through a musical presentation of truth such as they and others of their era composed.

Furthermore, unity of fellowship does not require us to completely set aside harmony voices in our musical worship to God. Some singers will not be able to sing every song (whether hymn or composed recently) in the range it is in, even as we seek to choose a singable key for most. This would hinder from singing those who might otherwise be able to sing by adding harmony.

This also well illustrates how God gives differing gifts and ministries but of His same Spirit to those in the Body of Christ.

Of course, I agree that singers seeking to promote themselves or show off their abilities are a hindrance to unity; however, harmonies can work together in a way that adds to the unity of the church in musical worship and helps support those without musical training as the Body sings praises to God in one voice when musicians have a heart to honor the Lord. Likewise, “one voice” does not mean only melody as referring to singing, but of being like-hearted and having one mind as Paul wrote in Philippians 2.

By the end, however, I was thankful I didn’t stop short in reading this book. Despite the writing style and things mentioned above, there were good points and helpful sections. ( )
  aebooksandwords | Jul 29, 2023 |
Wide is the gap between the “wishful image of pious community” and the church constituted by the great author of faith. So says Dietrich Bonhoeffer in his treatise on Christian community. Because the church is a real thing, it exists within a real context. Spatially, the church exists “in the midst of enemies.” Whether it is the Roman Empire or the Nazi government of Bonhoeffer’s day, the church expects opposition.

Chronologically, the church exists in a unique period of redemptive history. Though it tastes the first fruits, it awaits the final gathering at Christ’s return.

It is at this junction that Christians “find their mission.” Christ designates His church the “bringers of the message of salvation.” The evangelistic duty to the world flows from the heart of Christian community. Christian fellowship exists because “Christians need other Christians who speak God’s Word to them.” As the appointed administrators of the Word, Christian community assumes a particular form and structure. It is a “divine reality.”

“Divine reality” characterizes “spiritual reality,” which emanates from the Holy Spirit, while “emotional reality” proceeds from the flesh. The difference between spiritual and emotional reality is twofold. The first distinction is in what binds the community together. Spiritual community attests to the adhesive quality of common faith. The community between two believers “consists solely in what Christ has done to both of [them.]” Two Christians may share many traits, but none compare to their union in Christ. In comparison, competition plagues emotional communities as each member projects his own ideals onto the community. “[T]he visionary ideal binds the people together,” not faith in Christ.

The activity of Christians living together reveals the second difference between spiritual and emotional reality. The manner in which Christians love one another is fundamental since it shapes all other enterprises. Because an emotional community exists only out of the “desire for community” itself, its love is egocentric. Just as Wormwood knew his “ravenously affectionate” Uncle Screwtape, so too does an emotional community only know “the complete intimate fusion of I and You.” It is a consuming love that only asks how others are serving one’s own needs. Love in the spiritual community, however, “comes from Jesus Christ,” and “serves him alone.”

Selfless love extends into all facets of life within the spiritual community. Each activity, though distinct in habit, proceeds from the Word to serve the common good of believers. By praying the Psalms, the church discovers what prayer is and how “to pray as a community.” In prayer, believers unite in the body of Christ and learn true selflessness. Scripture reading draws Christians into a redemptive story. The community “participates” in the stories together and “receives salvation in Jesus Christ.” The stories of God’s redemptive love spur the Christian community into worship. Worship is the “victory song” of the church and reminds God’s people of all that He has done and is still doing for them. Though vocations are often considered in individual terms, they too serve the community. Work, in the hand of God, is an instrument “for purification of Christians from all self-absorption and selfishness.” Work outside the sphere of one’s direct Christian community prepares him for the work inside it. Service to others defines a life spent within Christian community. Believers are always looking for opportunities to serve others in the body through “listening,” “active helpfulness,” and “supporting one another.”

Interestingly, a life of service unveils the paradox of Christian freedom. Bearing the burdens of others within the community frees all that is “human nature, individuality, and talent” to flourish. Ironically, a life of selfless service, born from faith, liberates the believer to become most fully himself. In this way, life within the church follows the ex contrario pattern of God’s grace.

Every community enterprise culminates in the Lord’s Supper. Communion acknowledges spiritual reality and unifies the Christian community across time and space. At the table, the Christian community “has reached its goal” and is “complete.”

The divine reality of the church has real implications for the present moment. Too many in self-appointed positions of authority castigate the actual church against their idealized version of it. They “love their dream of a Christian community” and not the Christian community which exists among them, full of deplorables and others lacking in social and cultural power (10). And no poll or data suggest that is going to change anytime soon. The church in the immediate future projects to be a small remnant, despised and rejected for its audacity to challenge liberal dogmas of life, sexuality, and gender. We will not make it out without friends. The Christian community has been sown together exactly for this purpose. May we join in hope, faith, and love and strengthen the body now for the blows that come in the future. ( )
  rdhasler | Nov 15, 2022 |
After his martyrdom at the hands of the Gestapo in 1945, Dietrich Bonhoeffer continued his witness in the hearts of Christians around the world. His Letters and Papers from Prison became a prized testimony to Christian faith and courage, read by thousands. Now in Life Together we have Pastor Bonheoffer's experience of Christian community. This story of a unique fellowship in an underground seminary during the Nazi years reads like one of Paul's letters. It gives practical advice on how life together in Christ can be sustained in families and groups. The role of personal prayer, worship in common, everyday work, and Christian service is treated in simple, almost biblical, words. Life Together is bread for all who are hungry for the real life of Christian fellowship. 'When I think of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, some words Gorky used of Tolstoy come into my mind---'Look what a wonderful man is living on the earth.''---MALCOM MUGGERIDGE, author of Jesus
  wpcalibrary | Oct 13, 2022 |
This book will challenge your view of the church: what it is what it can be. Forget the show; this is shared life in a faith community. - Journey Coach

Bonhoeffer describes the beauty of living together in community with Christ. - Will Jones ( )
  JourneyPC | Sep 26, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Rich in suggestions for the cultivation of spiritual life.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarConcordia Theological Monthly
 
Thought-provoking....Breathes of real humility, love for the saints, and faith.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarThe Sunday School Times
 
Makes most contemporary Christian practice seem pale and thin.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarReligious Book Club Bulletin
 
A richness of Christian experience that cannot but enlarge one's sense of the depth and vitality of life in Christ.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarBaptist Leader
 
As challenging as The Cost of Discipleship.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarMennonite Weekly Review
 

» Adicionar outros autores (55 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Dietrich Bonhoefferautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Doberstein, John W.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Michael, PaulNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! (Ps. 133:1)
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
'Not,' as his friend Bethge says, 'that he believed that everybody must act as he did, but from where he was standing, he could see no possibility of retreat into any sinless, righteous, pious refuge. The sin of respectable people reveals itself in flight from responsibility. He saw that sin falling upon him and he took his stand.' (11)
"Such was the life and death of Dietrich Bonhoeffer - a teacher of the Church in the highest sense of the word, a writer of profound theological and Biblical insight and yet close to the contemporary life and sensitive to reality, a witness who saw the way of discipleship and walked it to the end." (18)
"'I will sow them among the people: and they shall remember me in far countries' (Zech. 10:9). According to God's will Christendom is a scattered people, scattered like seed 'into all the kingdoms of the earth' (Deut. 28:25). That is its curse and its promise. God's people must dwell in far countries among the unbelievers, but it will be the seed of the Kingdom of God in all the world." (18)
WC: "Seminarians before their ordination receive the gift of common life with their brethren for a definite period." (21)
"He knows that God's Word in Jesus Christ pronounces him guilty, even when he does not feel his guilt, and God's Word in Jesus Christ pronounces him not guilty and righteous, even when he does not feel that he is righteous at all. The Christian no longer lives of himself, by his own claims and his own justification, but by God's claims and God's justification. He lives wholly by God's word pronounced upon him, whether that Word declares him guilty or innocent." (22)
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

After his martyrdom at the hands of the Gestapo in 1945, Dietrich Bonhoeffer continued his witness in the hearts of Christians around the world. His Letters and Papers from Prison became a prized testimony to Christian faith and courage, read by thousands. Now in Life Together there is Pastor Bonhoeffer's experience of Christian community. This story of a unique fellowship in an underground seminary during the Nazi years reads like one of Paul's letters. It gives practical advice on how life together in Christ can be sustained in families and groups. The role of personal prayer, worship in common, everyday work, and Christian service is treated in simple, almost biblical, words. Life Together is bread for all who are hungry for the real life of Christian fellowship.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.17)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 13
2.5 2
3 53
3.5 8
4 106
4.5 15
5 146

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 208,791,978 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível