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The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and…
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The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus (original: 2005; edição: 2005)

de Margaret Atwood

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
5,1232271,619 (3.63)8 / 498
Homer's Odyssey is not the only version of the story. Mythic material was originally oral, and also local -- a myth would be told one way in one place and quite differently in another. I have drawn on material other than the Odyssey, especially for the details of Penelope's parentage, her early life and marriage, and the scandalous rumors circulating about her. I've chosen to give the telling of the story to Penelope and to the twelve hanged maids. The maids form a chanting and singing Chorus, which focuses on two questions that must pose themselves after any close reading of the Odyssey: What led to the hanging of the maids, and what was Penelope really up to? The story as told in the Odyssey doesn't hold water: there are too many inconsistencies. I've always been haunted by the hanged maids and, in The Penelopiad, so is Penelope herself. The author of The Handmaid's Tale and The Blind Assassin presents a cycle of stories about Penelope, wife of Odysseus, through the eyes of the twelve maids hanged for disloyalty to Odysseus in his absence.… (mais)
Membro:trulak
Título:The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus
Autores:Margaret Atwood
Informação:Canongate U.S. (2005), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 224 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus de Margaret Atwood (2005)

  1. 110
    Lavinia de Ursula K. Le Guin (rarm)
  2. 70
    The Lost Books of The Odyssey de Zachary Mason (alalba, jeanned)
    alalba: Both books offer alternative versions of the Odyssey.
  3. 50
    Weight: The Myth of Atlas and Heracles de Jeanette Winterson (nperrin)
  4. 40
    Medea de Christa Wolf (spiphany)
  5. 30
    The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel de Nikos Kazantzakis (SilentInAWay)
    SilentInAWay: Picks up where the Penelopiad leaves off...
  6. 30
    Black Ships de Jo Graham (ryvre)
  7. 20
    Circe de Madeline Miller (AaronPt)
  8. 20
    The Songs of the Kings de Barry Unsworth (smithal)
    smithal: Unsworth has a bitterly satiric, debunking approach to the Illiad story, which readers who enjoyed the Penelopiad should appreciate.
  9. 31
    Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold de C. S. Lewis (AnnaClaire)
    AnnaClaire: A different author retelling a different myth, but they still seem to fit together nicely.
  10. 10
    Eine ganz gewöhnliche Ehe. Odysseus und Penelope. Roman de Inge Merkel (spiphany)
  11. 10
    Sita's Ramayana de Samhita Arni (eclecticdodo)
    eclecticdodo: both books are retellings of traditional tales, from the woman's perspective, challenging traditional gender roles
  12. 43
    Mythology de Edith Hamilton (sibyllacumaea)
  13. 10
    Achilles de Elizabeth Cook (Booksloth)
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Inglês (222)  Holandês (1)  Francês (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Alemão (1)  Todos os idiomas (226)
Mostrando 1-5 de 226 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A fun read/listen on the surface, but serious notes underneath. Chocked with sharp tongued barbs offset with tongue in cheek quips. Penelope certainly doesn’t like Helen and lets us know it.
Nice that Atwood gives a voice to the Twelve, but this work feels more like an appendix as opposed to a full stand alone work. ( )
  jimgosailing | Nov 18, 2021 |
The Odyssey from the perspective of the bored housewife stuck at home.

"I suppose you know the rules. If we wish to, we can get ourselves reborn, and have another try at life; but first we have to drink from the waters of Forgetfulness, so our past lives will be wiped from our memories."

All the characters have come back countless times in history, even if Penelope swears she never would.

If you have read The Blind Assassin then Iris was Penelope, Laura was one of the twelve maids, that awful sister of Richard's was Eurycleia, and Alex was Odysseus (telling stories, causing havoc).
If you have read Maddadam then Toby was Penelope, Amanda was one of the twelve maids, Swift Fox was Helen, and Zeb was Odysseus, (of course).

It actually makes me like Maddadam a bit more to look at the book and each character in this light. It's such a god-awful book otherwise. The Blind Assassin, being perfect, enriches the Penelopiad. ( )
  RebeccaBooks | Sep 16, 2021 |
The Odyssey from Penelope’s point of view provides a good counterpoint to the classic tale by Homer. Penelope is pretty tired of The whole mess, although she still longs for her husband’s return.
I loved the Greek Chorus elements supplied by the maids. And the more pedestrian explanations of Odysseus’s exploits was refreshing.
I didn’t enjoy this as much as I thought I would. I don’t expect reverence for the original epic, but this seemed just a bit too flippant.
Still recommended for any lover retellings of Greek classics. ( )
  bohemima | Jun 5, 2021 |
What if tales of old weren't written by men about men for men? Hard not to measure it against Circe, which is a more thoughtful take on a similar idea, especially when the audiobook is read by a narrator who leans a little too far into the archness of Atwood's story, so that Penelope ends up sounding like a sassy Manhattan socialite rather than the world-weary but stoic voice that I had in my head from reading it on the page. ( )
  0ldScratch | May 31, 2021 |
This was a brutally honest, feminist retelling of the Odyssey. It didn't hide from the darkness of the story, it called the bluffs of the hero worship and idolising of the main male characters and showed us a glimpse of what they got up to in the shadows. Excellently crafted and researched, I just wish there had been more of it. ( )
  TCLinrow | Mar 17, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 226 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
She channels Penelope by way of Absolutely Fabulous; one can imagine her chain-smoking and swilling wine between cracks about the weakness of men and the misery they visit upon women.
 
Atwood has done her research: she knows that penelopeia means "duck" in Greek; that ribald stories about a Penelope - whether "our Penelope" or someone else - were circulated; and that virginity could be renewed by the blood of male sacrifice.
 

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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Atwood, Margaretautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Chakrabarti, NinaArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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'... Shrewd Odysseus! ... You are a fortunate man to have won a wife of such pre-eminent virtue! How faithful was your flawless Penelope, Icarius' daughter! How loyally she kept the memory of the husband of her youth! The glory of her virtue will not fade with the years, but the deathless gods themselves will make a beautiful song for mortal ears in honour of the constant Penelope'

      - The Odyssey, Book 24 (191-194)
. . . he took a cable which had seen service on a blue-bowed ship, made one end fast to a high column in the portico, and threw the other over the round-house, high up, so that their feet would not touch the ground. As when long-winged thrushes or doves get entangled in a snare . . . so the women's heads were held fast in a row, with nooses round their necks, to bring them to the most pitiable end. For a little while their feet twitched, but not for very long.

     — The Odyssey, Book 22 (470-473)
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The story of Odysseus' return to his home kingdom of Ithaca following an absence of twenty years is best known from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is said to have spend half of these years fighting the Trojan War and the other half wandering around the Aegean Sea, trying to get home, enduring hardships, conquering or evading mosters, and sleeping with goddesses. The character of 'wily Odysseus' has been much commented on: he's noted as a persuasive liar and disguise artist—a man who lives by his wits, who devises stratagems and tricks, and who is sometimes too clever for his own good. His divine helper is Pallas Athene, a goddess who admires Odysseus for his ready inventiveness. [from the Introduction]
Now that I'm dead I know everything. This is what I wished would happen, but like so many of my wishes it failed to come true. I know only a few factoids that I didn't know before. Death is much tooo high a price to pay for the satisfaction of curiosity, needless to say. [from Chapter I]
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Two questions must pose themselves after any close reading of The Odyssey: what led to the hanging of the maids, and what was Penelope really up to?
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The novella version of The Penelopiad issued under Canongate's Myths series should not be combined with the theatrical version of Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad - The Play (Faber and Faber ISBN 978-0571239498 and possibly other editions) due to the different form and content. Thank you.
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Homer's Odyssey is not the only version of the story. Mythic material was originally oral, and also local -- a myth would be told one way in one place and quite differently in another. I have drawn on material other than the Odyssey, especially for the details of Penelope's parentage, her early life and marriage, and the scandalous rumors circulating about her. I've chosen to give the telling of the story to Penelope and to the twelve hanged maids. The maids form a chanting and singing Chorus, which focuses on two questions that must pose themselves after any close reading of the Odyssey: What led to the hanging of the maids, and what was Penelope really up to? The story as told in the Odyssey doesn't hold water: there are too many inconsistencies. I've always been haunted by the hanged maids and, in The Penelopiad, so is Penelope herself. The author of The Handmaid's Tale and The Blind Assassin presents a cycle of stories about Penelope, wife of Odysseus, through the eyes of the twelve maids hanged for disloyalty to Odysseus in his absence.

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