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Rule 34 de Charles Stross
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Rule 34 (original: 2011; edição: 2011)

de Charles Stross

Séries: Halting State (2)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,1195313,121 (3.65)30
Head of the Rule 34 Squad monitoring the Internet for illegal activities, Detective Inspector Liz Kavanaugh investigates the link between three ex-con spammers who have been murdered.
Membro:tompe
Título:Rule 34
Autores:Charles Stross
Informação:Ace Hardcover (2011), Hardcover, 368 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Rule 34 de Charles Stross (2011)

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I took way, way too long to finish this. It would have had more of an impact at a quicker pace. ( )
  tatere | Dec 30, 2020 |
Stross' choice of second-person narrative can be difficult, at times. My biggest problem is the difficulty figuring out which character is currently the perspective character when I pick up the book after having set it down to go to sleep or work, but it's a bit odd and off-putting in general, though at least it was easier to keep track of characters in Rule 34 than it had been in Halting State. It think it might work much better for me if these books were written entirely from the perspective of a single character, or at least only switched perspectives between second-person on the same character every time and omniscient third-person when needed.

Perhaps Stross is trying to evoke some of the jangled nerves and distracted attention of his characters with this second-person narrative that switches between characters every time there's a new chapter, but if so he might want to consider whether making the reader feel like that (especially the distractedness) is conducive to pulling a reader into his writing, which this book failed to do for me until about two thirds of the way through. Perhaps, instead, he is using second-person perspectives to quickly give readers a stake in characters, which might be a good idea to help create some sympathy for the characters, but the downsides of shuffling through different characters that way outweigh the upsides for character sympathy for me, and in fact interfere with it. Perhaps he's trying to avoid a lot of character-thought exposition in third person while still delving into the way the characters feel in a straightforward manner, and recognizes this does not work so well in first-person perspective when jumping between characters a lot. Perhaps this is just an attempt to do something out of the ordinary and, thus, use second-person perspective as a cheap trick to try to get some critial acclaim. I just don't know, but it does not work all that well for me.

Then, of course, there's the problem that Stross spends probably sixty percent of his book's word count on explicit narrative exposition in huge blocks of "you think such-and-such about this aspect of your life" text. It was not until I got fairly close to the end that I finally felt some of the "rising action" current of the story sweeping me along as one expects from a dramatic work of fiction, when the plot started coming together in a way that intrigued me (despite a premise that should have intrigued me from the beginning), and when I started really caring about characters in the novel -- in fact, Liz Kavanaugh, who felt very much like the hero and primary protagonist of the novel, was someone I never actually developed much sympathy for, or interest in. I find myself liking her off-again love interest and a schmuck of a hapless tool in the midst of the plot most of all, one of whom got very little (but highly effective) time as perspective character at all. His treatment of some subjects also shows his biases, amply demonstrated in his other science fiction writing, in ways that ignores the possibility of alternative perspectives on some interesting subject matter altogether, which always frustrates me.

The story's finish, by the way, injected a (not terribly surprising) "twist" of sorts that felt ham-handed, and did not get the set-up it deserved.

In the end, I've come to the conclusion that the reason to read Charles Stross science fiction is not good story development (it's fine, I suppose), or great depth of meaning (its plot is basically just that of a near-future approaching-singularity version of the standard detective novel, honestly), brilliant plotting, addictive characters that really pull the reader in, or an evocative narrative style, all of which I found missing. The reason I finished this book, and will probably read the next, is Stross' treatment of technological advancement, which is at least interesting. ( )
  apotheon | Dec 14, 2020 |
I saw this book in the library and just jumped into the story. I haven't read any other Charles Stross novels and I didn't have a clue what Rule 34 was. (Googled that later.) It took awhile to get into it with the accents. Took a bit of time to figure out what was going on. Didn't understand some of the futuristic concepts. (Possibly didn't understand some of the non-futuristic concepts, either.) I had also never read a novel written entirely in the second person. In spite of all that, I found this novel humorous and interesting. The end is a little chilling and unsettling. I may read the other novel about Liz Kavenaugh that Stross wrote for a bit more background. ( )
  Chica3000 | Dec 11, 2020 |
Yeah, on a second reading, still not that fab.

"The AI manipulated everybody so that nobody had any real agency," is actually a really dull concept and it's at least the third time Stross has used it. Additionally the story story stops with heaps of loose ends and not much clarity about what's really happened. ( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
To call it a dead end job would be an understatement, policing the weird and sordid life of internet porn was like being in the U bend of her career as all the unpleasantness of life flowed past. This was DI Liz Kavanaugh's life now, but when a fetish nut dies on her watch, the Rule 34 squad goes from an irrelevance to high profile. This first death is just the tip of the fatberg as more start dying in the most bizarre ways possible and the more Kavanaugh finds out about the case and the links to organised crime, the less she wants to know…

This is loosely a sequel to Halting State with Kavanaugh being the only character who has made it from that book. There are all sorts going on in this future police thriller; in it, he crams all sorts about the possibilities of pervasive state monitoring, a psychopath loose and the way that the criminals work across states. The writing point of view doesn't always make it the easiest book to read, however, it is highly entertaining with some typical surreal moments and the pace varies from sluggish to fairly brisk. I liked it but didn't love it. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
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Charles Strossautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
MacKenzie, Robert IanNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Head of the Rule 34 Squad monitoring the Internet for illegal activities, Detective Inspector Liz Kavanaugh investigates the link between three ex-con spammers who have been murdered.

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