Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...
MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
832323,353 (3.17)3
The year young Australians sailed off to war in high hopes of adventure, only to find themselves faced with disaster. The tragedy and violence of Gallipoli provide the climax to this very personal, moving and surprisingly romantic story. With remarkable skill and in achingly beautiful prose, Roger McDonald takes the reader on an archetypal Australian journey which parallels the nation's progress from its country childhood, through the adolescent exuberance of its young cities, to initiation on one of the world's ancient battlefields. It is a vital journey, haunted by menace and disillusionment, one embedded in our national mythology. This astonishing first novel, published to great critical acclaim in 1979 and since then selling over 100,000 copies, tells the story of two boys from the bush, the thoughtful and awkward Walter and his knowing friend Billy Mackenzie, and their girls Frances and Diana. Together they discover a future which seems full of promise, drawing them into the exciting turmoil of passion and war. But theirs is a fateful alliance, in a world all too quickly passing, with an outcome they never could have foreseen.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 3 menções

Exibindo 2 de 2
Not one I enjoyed.

I'm don't think I'm in a place to appreciate literary fiction at the moment - I'm more interested in a good story - and I was frustrated with both the writing style and the plot. I didn't find it difficult to keep track of the characters but their motivations and emotions left me cold and for fuck sake, don't kill off a female character just to provoke a mental breakdown in a man, it's fucking irritating. Also how was Diana's death Francis' fault? AND after 90% of the book being a slow-burn, subtle exploration of manhood and coming-of-age, that last chapter of "Wally's gone and may or may not ever be seen again, Billy's gone mad and tried to murder everyone, and now Francis is kind-of flirting with a bloke she's never met and who was never really introduced to the reader, ok bye!" is massively incongruous and a terrible ending and I wish I'd given up on it earlier, honestly.

Writing style - for me, simile and metaphor should enhance what the author is trying to say. In this book, it usually left me going "huh?" and re-reading passages two or three times trying to puzzle out what McDonald was getting at.

If you want to know if you'll enjoy the writing style, the following passage sums up my peak exasperation (and please note, it's one sentence.

They walked away from the purpose that had brought them half way around the world and the decision just taken to go into battle without their horses; away from the human, the raw-tongued, the alarm and misapprehension that was their unseen but true uniform, and were forgiven - better, transported from - the sulking weight of their bodies by the brass rails of the bugle as they set off to do their grooming for the last time, gracefully absolved and released from all they had done and were about to do, draped by the wandering ribbons of the intricate bugling, which began now somehow to echo amongst its own earlier notes, entire phrases leaving for the silken distances of the sand-ocean only to return thin but re-charged to wander above the men as might glass rods (deep tinted blue) in a serene experiment of fate, creating a faint electricity to which the men thoughtfully submitted, scraps of hair rising under its power to attract the light and the harmless, scraps of wool, silk, feathers, paper, bran, gold leaf, and then all this movement joined by the sad brown heads of hundreds of horses in their picket-lines, heads shaking and bobbing with elastic polyphonic rhythm up up down as the men arrived and were greeted, nuzzled, ushered in to a last ritual embrace with the living things they had been called to care for.

(I thought maybe I would gain greater appreciation for that passage when I typed it out but nope, still immensely frustrated that that rambling, 233-word sentence made it past an editor.)

Anyway, I might just be too dumb for this book but I suspect I'm not the only one. ( )
  a-shelf-apart | Nov 19, 2019 |
I’m rather fond of Roger McDonald, it was he who christened me ‘Ambassador for Australian Literature’ when I met him at the Miles Franklin Award night in 2011. When Colts Ran was shortlisted for the award, and although it didn’t win that night it will earn its place in history as the novel that challenged the myths of rural Australia. (See my review). McDonald is a major author of long standing: Mr. Darwin’s Shooter was awarded the New South Wales, Victorian, and South Australian Premiers’ Literary Awards, and won the National Fiction Award at the 2000 Adelaide Writers’ Week, while the The Ballad of Desmond Kale won the 2006 Miles Franklin Award and South Australian Festival Prize for Fiction.

1915, A Novel (1979) was McDonald’s first novel, and it’s brilliant. I think it probably had to be, to find a publisher in that fiercely anti-war era in the wake of the moratorium marches and the withdrawal from Vietnam in 1975. My memories of that time are that it wasn’t just Lefties who were opposed to war: RSL branches were closing (or widening their membership base to ward off closing); Anzac Day marches were fading away and the notion of a war hero was fraught in the light of disclosures about the My Lai massacre.

And then in 1979 the University of Queensland Press published this debut novel by an unknown author. (Not entirely unknown: McDonald was awarded an Australia Council Senior Writer’s Fellowship to write it. Perhaps on the strength of his poetry collections Citizens of Mist (1969) and Airship (1975)?) The book won the ‘Age Book of the Year’ and the South Australian Biennial Literature Prize in 1980. In 1982 it was made into a seven-part ABC-TV television series. Peter Weir made his film Gallipoli in 1981. The Anzac legend was resurgent…

1915 tells the story of two lads from the bush, Billy Mackenzie and Walter Gilchrist, and how their not-always-friendly rivalry plays out from childhood to their war service on the battlefield in Gallipoli.

To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2013/02/16/1915-a-novel-by-roger-mcdonald/ ( )
  anzlitlovers | Oct 5, 2016 |
Exibindo 2 de 2
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The year young Australians sailed off to war in high hopes of adventure, only to find themselves faced with disaster. The tragedy and violence of Gallipoli provide the climax to this very personal, moving and surprisingly romantic story. With remarkable skill and in achingly beautiful prose, Roger McDonald takes the reader on an archetypal Australian journey which parallels the nation's progress from its country childhood, through the adolescent exuberance of its young cities, to initiation on one of the world's ancient battlefields. It is a vital journey, haunted by menace and disillusionment, one embedded in our national mythology. This astonishing first novel, published to great critical acclaim in 1979 and since then selling over 100,000 copies, tells the story of two boys from the bush, the thoughtful and awkward Walter and his knowing friend Billy Mackenzie, and their girls Frances and Diana. Together they discover a future which seems full of promise, drawing them into the exciting turmoil of passion and war. But theirs is a fateful alliance, in a world all too quickly passing, with an outcome they never could have foreseen.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.17)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5 1
4 2
4.5 1
5

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 204,629,532 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível