Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

In the Company of Crows and Ravens de John…
Carregando...

In the Company of Crows and Ravens (original: 2005; edição: 2005)

de John M. Marzluff (Autor), Tony Angell (Ilustrador), Paul Ehrlich (Prefácio)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3841449,927 (3.73)7
"Crows and people share similar traits and social strategies. To a surprising extent, to know the crow is to know ourselves.”--from the Preface From the cave walls at Lascaux to the last painting by Van Gogh, from the works of Shakespeare to those of Mark Twain, there is clear evidence that crows and ravens influence human culture. Yet this influence is not unidirectional, say the authors  of this fascinating book: people profoundly influence crow culture, ecology, and evolution as well. John Marzluff and Tony Angell examine the often surprising ways that crows and humans interact. The authors contend that those interactions reflect a process of "cultural coevolution.” They offer a challenging new view of the human-crow dynamic--a view that may change our thinking not only about crows but also about ourselves. Featuring more than 100 original drawings, the book takes a close look at the influences people have had on the lives of crows throughout history and at the significant ways crows have altered human lives. In the Company of Crows and Ravens illuminates the entwined histories of crows and people and concludes with an intriguing discussion of the crow-human relationship and how our attitudes toward crows may affect our cultural trajectory.… (mais)
Membro:Ferdaszewski
Título:In the Company of Crows and Ravens
Autores:John M. Marzluff (Autor)
Outros autores:Tony Angell (Ilustrador), Paul Ehrlich (Prefácio)
Informação:Yale University Press (2005), Edition: 5.6.2007, 384 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

In the Company of Crows and Ravens de John M. Marzluff (2005)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 7 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
And another half star. Great book with lovely pictures but a bit of a dry read so maybe better to dip into rather than read cover to cover as I did (albeit slowly). Could use more imagination with the structure of the book - the content was very interesting. ( )
  Ma_Washigeri | Jan 23, 2021 |
A fascinating book about corvids (crows and ravens), their behaviors and social nature, as well as their relationship and interactions with humans. The book seems a little repetitive and drawn out, but relatively easy to read. It seemed like the idea of co-evolution of corvids and humans is a little bit over-emphasized, but interesting nonetheless.
  JohnLavik | Mar 29, 2020 |
There's interesting information about crows, ravens, and their kin in here. But I'm having to read through a lot of uninteresting words to get to it. Unfortunately, it's not lively enough for a pop science book, but it's not focused enough for a hard science book. Too bad, because the premise is catchy.

(Also, the attributions are killing me. The citation number for further information is always on the final sentence of a paragraph, regardless of what information the endnote itself refers to. Very annoying to flip to the end of the book expecting an explanation of point C, only to get more detail on A.) ( )
  akaGingerK | Sep 30, 2018 |
In the Company of Crows and Ravens is a rather exhaustive and occasionally exhausting overview of corvids and (more so) an examination of humans and corvids entwined cultural influences. While the reader can scavenge the occasional shiny fact*, this book feels more like the flotsam and jetsam of a three-day long google search than a comprehensive introduction to corvids — at one point the author, John M. Marzluff, just resorts to listing all the bands he can think of that have the word "crow" in their name. Part of the muddle is that the book lacks a broader narrative direction. This is unfortunate as crow research (and by extension this book) brings up some contentious areas of biology (how speciation occurs in animals, the extent to which something can be said to be a language, at what levels natural selection appears to be exerting pressure, the extent to which learning animals that pass on knowledge can be said to have culture). I kept hoping that Marzluff would use his subject to give a broader sense of the state of the sciences themselves, as is done by many other popular science authors, perhaps even offering some of the current controversies in the field and the ideas of their respective defenders but, alas, the book never really rises above the details**. There are also some mechanical problems, such as quirky pet-words reused in quick succession, that make In the Company feel a little like a slapdash effort. That said, perhaps then my criticisms are less with the author than of his editor. As for the illustrations, they are very attractive and, admittedly, were what first drew me to the book. Alone, they make this a rather handsome addition to any bookshelf, even if you can never quite push through the full text.

* crows do not actually collect shiny objects

** a couple fascinating things about crows I learned:
i) magpies recognize themselves in the mirror and upon seeing a laser shone on their reflection will look down and start preening themselves
ii) some Seattle crows recognize the golden arches on a bag and will fly to it, rather than a plain bag containing identical food inside ( )
  rabbit.blackberry | Oct 19, 2017 |
In the Company of Crows and Ravens is a rather exhaustive and occasionally exhausting overview of corvids and (more so) an examination of humans and corvids entwined cultural influences. While the reader can scavenge the occasional shiny fact*, this book feels more like the flotsam and jetsam of a three-day long google search than a comprehensive introduction to corvids — at one point the author, John M. Marzluff, just resorts to listing all the bands he can think of that have the word "crow" in their name. Part of the muddle is that the book lacks a broader narrative direction. This is unfortunate as crow research (and by extension this book) brings up some contentious areas of biology (how speciation occurs in animals, the extent to which something can be said to be a language, at what levels natural selection appears to be exerting pressure, the extent to which learning animals that pass on knowledge can be said to have culture). I kept hoping that Marzluff would use his subject to give a broader sense of the state of the sciences themselves, as is done by many other popular science authors, perhaps even offering some of the current controversies in the field and the ideas of their respective defenders but, alas, the book never really rises above the details**. There are also some mechanical problems, such as quirky pet-words reused in quick succession, that make In the Company feel a little like a slapdash effort. That said, perhaps then my criticisms are less with the author than of his editor. As for the illustrations, they are very attractive and, admittedly, were what first drew me to the book. Alone, they make this a rather handsome addition to any bookshelf, even if you can never quite push through the full text.

* crows do not actually collect shiny objects

** a couple fascinating things about crows I learned:
i) magpies recognize themselves in the mirror and upon seeing a laser shone on their reflection will look down and start preening themselves
ii) some Seattle crows recognize the golden arches on a bag and will fly to it, rather than a plain bag containing identical food inside ( )
  rabbit.blackberry | Oct 19, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
There's a great unease between humans and the genus Corvus, which includes both crows and ravens. As biologist John Marzluff and artist Tony Angell tell it in their beautiful new natural-history book, "In the Company of Crows and Ravens", humanity's fear/respect relationship with these birds goes back millions of years.
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
John M. Marzluffautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Angell, TonyIlustradorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ehrlich, PaulPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree

Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued

Robert Frost, "Dust of Snow," 1923
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It's midmorning and a single crow has arrived unseen to parage about the lawn outside our open window.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (3)

"Crows and people share similar traits and social strategies. To a surprising extent, to know the crow is to know ourselves.”--from the Preface From the cave walls at Lascaux to the last painting by Van Gogh, from the works of Shakespeare to those of Mark Twain, there is clear evidence that crows and ravens influence human culture. Yet this influence is not unidirectional, say the authors  of this fascinating book: people profoundly influence crow culture, ecology, and evolution as well. John Marzluff and Tony Angell examine the often surprising ways that crows and humans interact. The authors contend that those interactions reflect a process of "cultural coevolution.” They offer a challenging new view of the human-crow dynamic--a view that may change our thinking not only about crows but also about ourselves. Featuring more than 100 original drawings, the book takes a close look at the influences people have had on the lives of crows throughout history and at the significant ways crows have altered human lives. In the Company of Crows and Ravens illuminates the entwined histories of crows and people and concludes with an intriguing discussion of the crow-human relationship and how our attitudes toward crows may affect our cultural trajectory.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.73)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 10
3.5 3
4 21
4.5 2
5 6

Yale University Press

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Yale University Press.

Edições: 0300100760, 0300122551

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,776,439 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível