Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Clarissa or the History of a Young Lady (2…
Carregando...

Clarissa or the History of a Young Lady (2 Volumes) (original: 1747; edição: 1991)

de Samuel Richardson (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
1,2982611,017 (3.48)1 / 374
Pressured by her unscrupulous family to marry a wealthy man she detests, the young Clarissa Harlowe is tricked into fleeing with the witty and debonair Robert Lovelace and places herself under his protection. Lovelace, however, proves himself to be an untrustworthy rake whose vague promises of marriage are accompanied by unwelcome and increasingly brutal sexual advances. And yet, Clarissa finds his charm alluring, her scrupulous sense of virtue tinged with unconfessed desire. Told through a complex series of interweaving letters, Clarissa is a richly ambiguous study of a fatally attracted couple and a work of astonishing power and immediacy. A huge success when it first appeared in 1747, and translated into French and German, it remains one of the greatest of all European novels.… (mais)
Membro:Clarissa_
Título:Clarissa or the History of a Young Lady (2 Volumes)
Autores:Samuel Richardson (Autor)
Informação:The Folio Society (1991), Edition: First Edition Thus, 1534 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Clarissa, or, The History of a Young Lady de Samuel Richardson (1747)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Mostrando 1-5 de 26 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Not a book I liked. not the story, not the way of writing, I'm happy to be done! ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Jul 24, 2021 |
I AM FINISHED!!!! This book is both enormous and slow-moving and took me a month to get through.

It's also utterly aggravating to spend so much time with a selfish, spoiled man who gaslights a vulnerable and naive young woman who does not wish to be married off to acquire her family a bigger fortune. In short, there are 537 letters filled with stories of work and faintings, self-love, and much shaming of women.

The libertines in Samuel Richardson's novels are neither sympathetic nor commendable men, but at least Pamela's Mr. B. (called Booby by Henry Fielding, WHICH SO FITS) does kooky stunts, like cross-dressing as a maid, in order to grab Pamela's breast. Mr. Lovelace just gaslights Clarissa until the infamous rape scene, and OMG, it's too much like real life and sooooo exhausting. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
An epistolary novel, one of the first, I believe. It is of astonishing sameness, but is a fine example of 1740's soft porn. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Oct 11, 2019 |
This was an 18th century story of Clarissa Harlowe, a young girl, who rather than be forced by her family to marry a man she despises, is aided in running away by a real scoundrel. This book is written in epistolary form with Clarissa and her best friend, Miss Howe, being the primary letter writers. Miss Howe is a true friend to Clarissa throughout the very sad story. This was a very long book and began to drag in the middle when Clarissa and her friend constantly moralize on their fates; it's very repetitive. There are some parts that are unbelievable; such as when Clarissa is moved to a lodging, which in reality is a brothel (twice) and she has no idea. Maybe naivety is supposed to be part of the story line; but from the beginning one would not assume Clarissa to be naive. 1534 pages ( )
  Tess_W | Jun 29, 2019 |
In Clarissa, Richardson solves certain technical problems coming from the letter form, one being the limited point of view and limited consciousness of the single letter-writer evident in Pamela. In Clarissa he extends the letter writing to a whole cast of characters with different views of the action, different moral principles, and different education. One character is usually the dominant letter-writer; this position moves from Clarissa to Lovelace to Belford to Morden at the very end. We can see an action from several writers who differ in their physical relation to it, their moral attitudes, and their expectations about what could and should come next.
Even when Clarissa herself is doing most of the writing in the beginning, comments by Anna Howe and others emphasize Clarissa’s isolation and also preserve some objectivity and perspective. Richardson is careful to differentiate styles, giving Howe a livelier and less circumlocutious style than Clarissa’s, even though the girls are of comparable age, interest, social position, and clear-headedness. In one letter early on Howe predicts the outcome of the present situation in words that could not come from Clarissa (of whom Johnson says, “there is always something which she prefers to truth”). Again, it is Howe who tells Clarissa that “punctilio is out of doors” if she once leaves her father’s house with Lovelace.
Lovelace is well-characterized, not to say that Richardson can really write like an educated rake, but Lovelace is splendidly evil and differentiated from his brother rakes, Belford and Mowbray. Belford was never an enthusiastic reprobate, and Mowbray is cruder than the others, as he shows in a letter after Clarissa’s death. Lovelace has a refinement that makes his intrigues more elaborate, and his enthusiasm is damnable and engaging at once. Lovelace sets up dramatic devices, such as the dinner party where Clarissa innocently comments on her fellow diners without knowing they are rakes and prostitutes. The method of “writing to the moment” is already as close to drama as you can get in narrative, and Richardson frequently sets up the narrative as drama, with speech headings, stage directions, and act/scene designations. Lovelace is in fact personating various characters: one for the landlady, another for Clarissa—and bringing in other actors who are playing parts to fool Clarissa. Lovelace’s letters occasionally turn into soliloquy, and his use of ironic self-justification approaches the comic.
The letters are also plot devices. They are written, but also “copied, sent, received, shown about, discussed, answered, even perhaps hidden, intercepted, stolen, altered, or forged” (McKillop, The Early Masters of English Fiction). Belford’s futile attempts to dissuade Lovelace from his designs on Clarissa are as ineffective as Anna Howe’s attempt to persuade Clarissa to marry Lovelace before and after the rpe. Lovelace’s forged and altered letters, on the other hand, are most effective in bringing about his purposes and keeping Clarissa ignorant of them.
The letter technique never completely breaks down in Clarissa as it does inPamela, when Richardson seems forced to insert a narrative transition. But Richardson chooses to enter the narrative many times, in notes between letters and footnotes where he tries to keep his readers’ sympathies correctly aligned, bowdlerizes, or condenses, as when he omits the early Clarissa/Lovelace correspondence or cuts and abstracts, from the posthumous letters of Clarissa, for example. All this gives a distinct impression of the physical reality of the letters as artifacts, present on the “editor’s” desk.
There are still drawbacks to the method, partly aggravated by what Sherburn calls Richardson’s “prolix fondling of episodes” (A Literary History of England). The letter writers remember impossibly involved sequences of incidents and long passages of dialogue fraught with nuances. We wonder how they could have found time to writ their voluminous letters. Dorothy Van Ghent complains that the letter form “slows down the pace of the story almost intolerably” (The English Novel: Form and Function), but if we compare an epistolary novel like Humphry Clinker, we suspect that the pace is all Richardson’s doing and none of the form’s.
The key to the success of the technique here is that it opens up the book and lets the reader in. We only have, I believe, a very limited identification with either Pamela or Clarissa in the sense that we get inside their characters and see them as us. They are monsters—not in the way Fielding thought Pamela a moral monster, but in the sense that they do successfully resist what Richardson tries to depict as irresistible forces. Pamela resists the guile and force of Mr. B, and if we see the depicted actions as merely representative of the attack Pamela has to fend off, her story is one of almost impossibly triumphant virtue. In that sense she is difficult to identify with, as Aristotle said was the case with heroes who were too good. Clarissa is similarly difficult to inhabit, not in her successful resistance to rape, but in her resistance to pressure from everyone to marry Lovelace, who is rich and attractive in addition to the love he so assiduously feigns. In the middle of the book, when Lovelace proposes repeatedly to Clarissa, while Anna Howe is urging her to marry him and Clarissa’s parents are saying that marrying him is the only thing she can do, we find ourselves saying “Do it! Why are you hesitating?” even though we know Lovelace’s character and his whole mind. Clarissa’s constant awareness, despite her youth and comparative innocence, without the special knowledge we have, that Lovelace will not do as a husband for her—that is what makes her so different from you and me. It makes her “an Exemplar to her sex” at the same time it makes her difficult to identify with.
Richardson allows us to enter the novel by using multiple correspondents. More specifically, the characters of Anna Howe and Belford, and to a slighter extent Colonel Morden, are the means by which we can get into the action of Clarissa as participants who are enough like us. The very ineffectualness of Howe and Belford is indicative of this function: like us, they are forced to watch what happens with precious little power to affect it one way or another. When Belford exhorts Lovelace not to hurt Clarissa the admonition has no more force than our hissing at the villain from the audience of a melodrama. Anna Howe tells Clarissa to marry Lovelace, and so do we—both she and we acting probably against our better judgment but wanting something other than the tragic alternative we suspect is coming. They are surrogates for us as readers completely unable to affect the action, and we are inside them urging some hopeful move.
Colonel Morden’s function is slightly different in terms of his effect on the reader. He comes, against the professed better judgment of Richardson, who supposedly condemned duels, to bring about poetic justice, or at least revenge. It is curious that there are so many duels in Richardson, but he would probably say it was a pity that there were so many real and attempted rapes, too, in life as well as in his books, but that does not show he approved of them. At any rate we may identify with Morden, and at last our identification allows us to participate in action. We help kill Lovelace, we too have some second thoughts about whether we should have done it, but at least it allows some feeling of resolution of the action, dispersion of the emotional tension, and feeling of having done something.
1 vote michaelm42071 | Jul 12, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 26 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (12 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Richardson, Samuelautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Brett, SimonIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Butt, John EverettIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ross, AngusEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stinstra, JanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wilson, AngusIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
I am extremely concerned, my dearest friend, for the disturbances that have happened in your family.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The person who will bear much shall have much to bear, all the world through.
But what will not these men say to obtain belief, and a power over one?
Why was such a woman as this thrown in my way, whose very fall will be her glory, and perhaps not only my shame, but my destruction?
Marriage, with these women, thou seest, Jack, is an atonement for all we can do to them.
There is a good and a bad light in which everything that befalls us may be taken. If the human mind will busy itself to make the worst of every disagreeable occurrence, it will never want woe.
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
ISBN 0140432159 is NOT a Signet Classic abridgment edition
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Pressured by her unscrupulous family to marry a wealthy man she detests, the young Clarissa Harlowe is tricked into fleeing with the witty and debonair Robert Lovelace and places herself under his protection. Lovelace, however, proves himself to be an untrustworthy rake whose vague promises of marriage are accompanied by unwelcome and increasingly brutal sexual advances. And yet, Clarissa finds his charm alluring, her scrupulous sense of virtue tinged with unconfessed desire. Told through a complex series of interweaving letters, Clarissa is a richly ambiguous study of a fatally attracted couple and a work of astonishing power and immediacy. A huge success when it first appeared in 1747, and translated into French and German, it remains one of the greatest of all European novels.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.48)
0.5 1
1 13
1.5 1
2 20
2.5 2
3 36
3.5 10
4 49
4.5 3
5 38

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,519,856 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível