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Sotilas ilman menneisyyttä de Diego…
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Sotilas ilman menneisyyttä (original: 2000; edição: 2003)

de Diego Marani, Leena Taavitsainen-Petäjä ((KÄÄnt.))

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3542155,842 (3.38)56
"One night at Trieste in September 1943, a seriously wounded soldier is found on the quay. The doctor, of a newly arrived German hospital ship, Pietri Friari, gives the unconscious soldier medical assistance. His new patient has no documents or anything that can identifying him. When he regains consciousness he has lost his memory and cannot even remember what language he speaks. From a few things found on the man the doctor, who is originally from Finland, believes him to be a sailor and a fellow countryman, who somehow or other has ended up in Trieste. The doctor dedicates himself to teaching the man Finnish, beginning the reconstruction of the identity of Sampo Karjalainen, leading the missing man to return to Finland in search of his identity and his past"--P. [4] of cover.… (mais)
Membro:timoroso
Título:Sotilas ilman menneisyyttä
Autores:Diego Marani
Outros autores:Leena Taavitsainen-Petäjä ((KÄÄnt.))
Informação:Helsinki : Helmi, 2003.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

New Finnish grammar de Diego Marani (2000)

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En dag i 1944 bliver en mand fundet på havnen i Trieste. Han er blevet overfaldet og svæver mellem liv og død, da han kommer om bord på det tyske hospitalsskib Tübingen. Han har finsk marineuniform på med navnet Sampo Karjalainen i kraven, og eftersom hele hans hukommelse tilsyneladende er slettet af slagene, er det nærliggende at tro, at det er hans navn. Det er det i hvert fald for doktor Friari, der selv er fra Finland, og selvom han blev tvunget til at flygte efter borgerkrigen, længes han stadig efter fædrelandet.

Når man har glemt alle ord og alle minder, kan det ene sprog være lige så godt som det andet, og inden længe er Friari i fuld gang med at lære Sampo finsk. Det går kun langsomt fremad, men der er lagt en grund, inden skibet skal sejle sydpå, og Friari får organiseret hans hjemtur til Helsinki. Håbet er, at de vante omgivelser, lyden af sproget og gerne også en kvindes kærlighed, kan vække den forsvundne personlighed til live igen.

Så nemt viser det sig ikke at være. Problemet er, at Sampo Karjalainen er et meget almindeligt navn og derfor umuligt at spore, og i stedet for at blive modtaget af en fremtrædende neurolog på militærhospitalet, må Sampo klare sig med en seng og intensive finskkurser med pastor Koskela tilsat store doser brændevin og national patos hentet i Kalevala. Selvom hans finsk bliver bedre som månederne går, og selvom han efterhånden kommer i kontakt med både journalister og den smukke sygeplejerske Ilma, så mangler gennembruddet til den forsvundne identitet stadig.

Historien fortælles delvis af doktor Friari og delvis af Sampo selv. Efter krigen har Friari fundet hans notater, nogle hæfter med grammatikøvelser og andre spor, som tilsammen fortæller historien om hans ophold i Helsinki. Det virker fuldkommen urealistisk, at Sampo, der var berøvet ikke bare det finske sprog men sprog i det hele taget, skulle kunne skrive så smuk og kompleks en beretning, men hvis man er villig til at se bort fra denne usandsynlighed, så fungerer historien.

Det er også sjovt at læse en italiensk roman, som samtidig bliver en rejsefortælling om det mærkelige og eksotiske nord. Hvor mange gange har vi ikke læst om nordeuropæere, der rejste sydpå for at finde lidenskab og autencitet? Her bliver den idé vendt på hovedet, og resultatet er både underholdende og interessant. Som mennesker har vi desperat behov for at være nogen og høre til et sted, og det er dette eksistentielle behov, Sampo håber at få opfyldt. ( )
  Henrik_Madsen | Oct 7, 2016 |
In WWII Trieste, a German neurologist of Finnish origin is asked to treat a patient with head injuries. When the patient regains consciousness he has amnesia and has lost all knowledge of his language. Since the jacket the patient was wearing had a Finnish name sewn into the collar, the doctor teaches him some rudimentary Finnish and arranges for him to be sent to Helsinki.

I really enjoyed this exploration of identity, language, and cultural belonging in an Italian author's ponderings on Finnish-ness. It was the author's first novel and I've put his second on my wislist ( )
  Robertgreaves | Sep 2, 2016 |
Memory is inseparable from words. Words draw things out of the shadows"
By sally tarbox on 16 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
When I came across this novel on the fiction shelf of the library, my first thought was that it must be misplaced from the language section. However having had a serious (if ultimately not hugely successful) attempt at mastering Finnish in my youth, my interest was whetted.
This is the tale of an injured man picked up in wartime Hamburg; he has total amnesia and even lost the use of language. The neurologist who cares for him takes him to be a Finn, like himself, and begins coaching him in the language. The narrative alternates between notes left by the patient, interspersed with pages by the doctor, in which we come to know his own life.
Although Sampo Karjalainen, the man with amnesia, is a lonely and pitiable figure, somehow he left me quite cold. This is a well-written and academic work - but I wonder if it would be equally interesting to readers with no interest in or knowledge of Finnish and the Kalevala (epic poem). ( )
  starbox | Jul 9, 2016 |
A lovely title, admitting myriad possibilities, and all in all, what emerges doesn't entirely disappoint. But the general theme, which, without spoiling anything because it's clear early on, is identity through language, does seem a bit thin compared to the riches possible from the characters involved, who end up primarily acting out the theme and somewhat failing to have lives of their own. Along the way there are nice insights into what it means to have a large, powerful, and typically predatory country as a neighbor, and to learn a language which is almost an only child among languages, both of which are satisfying, if nonfictional, aspects of the work.

The translation was a bit awkward once in a while, but nothing that impeded the flow of reading. I just wish the title's promise had been more substantially fulfilled.
  V.V.Harding | Apr 21, 2015 |
A few years ago I got into a rather intense discussion along the lines of whether there is any association between the currency used by a country and their population's feeling of national pride and identity. It was prompted by comments from someone in the British government who was arguing vehemently in favour of Britain keeping the pound sterling as its national currency. Part of the politician's argument seemed to be that if Britain adopted the Euro, like other members of the European Community, it would lose a critical element of what makes Britain special. It was an argument that held no merit for my three dinner companions, all of whom came from countries which had already 'lost' the peseta and the franc in favour of the Euro.

If currency doesn't define a person's identity and affiliation to a country, what about language? New Finnish Grammar by Diego Marani suggests that without our language, we have no roots and no memory. Don't be misled by the title, this isn't a turgid academic study about a fringe language, but an intelligently written novel by a linguist working for the European Community.

The story is quite a simple one. It begins with the discovery of a badly-beaten man on a quayside in Trieste during World War 2. Though he recovers consciousness he has no memory and no language and nothing to identify himself except for the name tag of "SAMPO KARJALAINEN" sewn inside the seaman's jacket which suggests he is of Finnish origin. A passing military doctor Petri Friari, resolves to re-aquaint the mystery man with the language of his homeland as a way of restoring his memory and rebuilding his life. Petri tells his patient:

The merest breath is enough if there is still any fire at all beneath the ashes…. You will have to work hard. Finnish is the language in which you were brought up, the language of the lullaby that sent you to sleep each night. Apart from studying it you must learn to love it. think of each word as though it was a magic charm which might open a door to memory. Say each word aloud as though it were a prayer…

Sampo recovers sufficiently to be repatriated to a hospital in his supposed home in Helsinki. There with the aid of another doctor, a pastor who believes in the restorative power of Finnish myths and legends and a Red Cross nurse, he tries to find himself once again. It's not an easy task. Finnish apparently is a fiendishly difficult language "thorny but delicate."

...the Finnish sentence is like a cocoon, impenetrable, closed in on itself; here meaning ripens slowly and when, when ripe flies off, bright and elusive ... whin foreigners listen to a Finn speaking they always have the sense that something is flying out of his moth, the words fan out and lightly close in again; they hover in the air and then dissolve. It is pointless to try and capture them, because their meaning is in their flight…

Sampo meets the challenge head on, diligently applying himself to his lessons everyday but though his vocabulary and understanding improves, his knowledge of his identity remains elusive.

I had a distinct suspicion that I was running headlong down the wrong road. In the innermost recesses of my unconscious I was plagued by the feeling that, within my brain, another brain was beating, buried alive.

This is a novel about alienation, about isolation, how we relate to our pasts, to our cultural traditions and to our mother tongue. It has an overwhelming sense of sadness, the feeling that no matter how much we try, it's impossible to find the way back. It's a book that makes you think and to appreciate the value of the language we heard from our first moments on earth and that we use every day without giving it a second thought.

A wonderful novel, that was considered a masterpiece when it was published in Marani's native Italian. It's taken more than 10 years to become available in English but well worth the wait. ( )
  Mercury57 | Feb 14, 2015 |
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There is more than one reason, one comes to realise, why Marani – an Italian – chose Finnish as the lost language of his hero. This is a novel about loss, about not having: asked by a nurse what he likes most about the language, Karjalainen replies: "the abessive . . . a declension for things we haven't got: koskenkorvsatta, toivatta, no koskenkorva, no hope, both are declined in the abessive. It's beautiful, it's like poetry! And also very useful, because there are more things we haven't got than that we have."

And this is also about the madness of war, the importance of love ("without someone else beside us, watching us live, we might as well be dead"), about memory and forgetting, about the tragedy of existence, and all these "abouts" are handled so subtly and naturally, occurring so inevitably in the narrative that all I can do, unless I go away and think about it for two weeks, a luxury unavailable to this reviewer, is simply to tell you to read it, and brace yourself for something special.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (3 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Diego Maraniautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Landry, JudithTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"One night at Trieste in September 1943, a seriously wounded soldier is found on the quay. The doctor, of a newly arrived German hospital ship, Pietri Friari, gives the unconscious soldier medical assistance. His new patient has no documents or anything that can identifying him. When he regains consciousness he has lost his memory and cannot even remember what language he speaks. From a few things found on the man the doctor, who is originally from Finland, believes him to be a sailor and a fellow countryman, who somehow or other has ended up in Trieste. The doctor dedicates himself to teaching the man Finnish, beginning the reconstruction of the identity of Sampo Karjalainen, leading the missing man to return to Finland in search of his identity and his past"--P. [4] of cover.

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