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Led Zeppelin I (Remastered Original Vinyl)…
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Led Zeppelin I (Remastered Original Vinyl) (edição: 2014)

de Led Zeppelin (Artist)

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Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin is the first and only official illustrated book to be produced in collaboration with the members of the band. Celebrating 50 years since their formation, it covers the group's unparalleled musical career and features photographs of Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham on and offstage, in candid moments and in the recording studio. This definitive 368-page volume includes unseen photographs and artwork from the Led Zeppelin archives and contributions from photographers around the world.… (mais)
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Título:Led Zeppelin I (Remastered Original Vinyl)
Autores:Led Zeppelin (Artist)
Informação:Atlantic (2014)
Coleções:Vinyl 2017
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Bass, Organ, Backing Vocals – John Paul Jones
Drums, Timpani, Backing Vocals – John Bonham
Engineer – Glyn Johns
Executive-Producer – Peter Grant
Harmonica, Lead Vocals – Robert Plant
Photography By [Rear Sleeve] – Chris Dreja
Producer, Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Pedal Steel Guitar, Backing Vocals – Jimmy Page

Made By – MacNeill Press Ltd.
Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.
Manufactured By – Polydor Records Ltd.
Licensed From – Atlantic Recording Corporation
Published By – Jewel Music
Published By – Superhype Music, Inc.
  jlafarga001 | Jul 21, 2020 |
CHECK SHELVES
  VPALib | Mar 6, 2019 |
Led Zeppelin

1. Good Times Bad Times (2:46)
2. Babe I’m Gonna Leave You (6:41)
3. You Shook Me (6:28)
4. Dazed and Confused (6:26)
5. Your Time is Gonna Come (4:14)
6. Black Mountain Side (2:05)
7. Communication Breakdown (2:27)
8. I Can’t Quit You Baby (4:42)
9. How Many More Times (8:28)

Robert Plant – lead vocal, harmonica
Jimmy Page – electric guitar, acoustic guitar, pedal steel guitar, backing vocal
John Paul Jones – bass, organ, backing vocal
John Bonham – drums, tympani, backing vocal


Recorded and mixed at Olympic Studios, London, October 1968.
Originally released as Atlantic 8216, 12 January 1969 (US).

Atlantic, 1994. [TT 44:52.] No lyrics. Digitally remastered from the original master tapes by Jimmy Page and George Marino at Sterling Sound.

=======================================

When The Doors recorded their tremendous first album in August 1966, they had been playing together for about a year. They didn’t spring out of nothing. They were ready to make a big splash – and they did. Not the least remarkable thing about Led Zeppelin’s equally smashing debut album is that it did, indeed, come out of nothing. The band had been together for just one Scandinavian tour between 7 and 17 September, 1968. The four members barely knew each other. Yet on the next month, reportedly for mere 36 hours and £1,782, they recorded an album that went on to gross some £3.5 million and sound compelling more than 47 years later.

How was this possible? There are two answers to that question. First, the band simply consisted of four brilliant musicians who had something important to say and the luck to hit it off immediately. Second, they stole most of the music from other, more talented but unfortunately more obscure, artists and made pots of money on plagiarized and barely credited material. Now the truth here is not, I’m afraid, somewhere in the middle. It is much closer to the first reason and much further from the second than some people would have you believe.

There have been a great deal of controversy, bad blood and out-of-court settlements over copyright issues in regard to Led Zeppelin in general and their first album in particular. Three of the songs – “You Shook Me” and “I Can’t Quit You Baby” by the blues legend Willie Dixon and the traditional “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” – were credited as covers/arrangements from the beginning. When it was found, in the 1980s, that the “traditional” song was written by one Anne Bredon in the 1950s, she received a writing credit and royalties. At least three other songs – “Dazed and Confused”, “Black Mountain Side” and “How Many More Times” – have been attributed to a host of other artists, some of whom threatened to sue and got paid out of court.

I have rather mixed feelings about all this. It was certainly wrong that Zeppelin, either from negligence or deliberate intention, did not credit properly the original composers. But the case is a lot more complex than that. First of all, Zeppelin’s reworking of the original material – if it was original, for borrowing was anything but uncommon among blues musicians at the time – always was highly creative. Compare with Willie Dixon’s songs or the version of “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” by Joan Baez and you will see how far Zeppelin went with their “reworking”. This is even more the case with “Dazed and Confused” which is really an entirely original composition. Jake Holmes didn’t think so, sued (in 2010!) and, of course, got some money to lighten up his old age. Listen to his “Dazed and Confused” and tell me what it has to do with Zeppelin’s. I really would like to know. Same deal with “How Many More Times” and “How Many More Years” by Howlin Wolf. At best, it’s a homage to yet another blues legend.

For my part, several questions bother me. Why suing for copyright issues four decades too late? Would all this copyright hype have happened at all if Led Zeppelin had never become famous? How much is genuinely wounded artistic vanity and how much sheer greed? Would Johann Sebastian Bach, had he lived in the end of the nineteenth century, have been angry because Brahms used a short theme from one of his cantatas for the magisterial set of variations that constitute the finale of his Fourth Symphony?

(Even more ridiculously, Willie Dixon sued and won credit and cash for “Whole Lotta Love” because he had unwittingly supplied some profound lyrics like “woman you need love”. This is taking the copyright mania way too far. And Dixon sued in 1985 – 16 years after LZ’s song was officially released.)

To conclude this tiresome issue, Zeppelin should have been more careful with the writing credits and there the matter should – would – have ended. Perhaps some royalties, if the original artists are destitute, might have been acceptable – but not much. Zeppelin put an enormous amount of original creativity to make enduring classics out of mediocre material that would have been long forgotten but for their “stealing”. It is only fair that they should take the royal share of both credit and profit.

The music is exceptionally varied for a first album of then-unknown band. Dixon’s rather monotonous originals are transformed into something infinitely more expressive. Acoustic arrangements range from short instrumentals (“Black Mountain Side”) to ballads on the grand scale (“Babe I’m Gonna Leave You”). Hard-rock that leaves far behind the blues roots range from firecrackers like “Good Times Bad Times” and “Communication Breakdown”, with riffs and solos that will knock your socks off, to epic multi-sectional compositions like “How Many More Times” and “Dazed and Confused”. The latter is emphatically one of Zeppelin’s (Jake Holmes be blown!) most astonishing creations. The combination of ominous bass, psychedelic guitars, powerful drums, robust vocals and killer lines like “Wanted a woman, never bargained for you” and “Lots of people talkin’, few of them know / Soul of a woman was created below” is unique to Led Zeppelin. If you think that’s harrowing or even misogynist, consider the opening stanza of “Your Time is Gonna Come”, a deceptively mild, keyboard-dominated ballad:

Lyin', cheatin', hurtin', that's all you seem to do.
Messin' around with every guy in town,
Puttin' me down for thinkin' of someone new.


As usual with Zeppelin, there are no individual superstars (i.e. usurpers) among the four members. But Robert Plant should be singled out. He is in glorious voice. The top end is well-nigh incredible, most notably in the several flirtations with Page’s guitar (“Dazed and Confused”, “You Shook Me”) and the awesome glissando in “How Many More Times” (not unlike the one Freddie Mercury does in “Under Pressure”). The sheer power and flexibility displayed here Plant may have equalled, but hardly surpassed, in the Third or the Fourth album. It is sad that this sweet, clear, ringing, effortless and wide-ranging voice was already irreparably damaged by 1973, but I guess it could not have been otherwise considering Plant’s reckless dedication, not just in the first four albums, but also in Zeppelin’s killing concert schedule in those early years (1969–73).

Of Led Zeppelin’s legendary first four albums, the debut is arguably the weakest. This applies to both the songwriting and the somewhat crude sound. All the same, it is a magnificent album many a band would have loved to have in their discographies. Only Led Zeppelin could have produced it, though, and only at this specific point of their history when the blues influence was still strong. The Second and the Third album, in their wildly different ways, departed still further from the roots. The celestial Fourth is entirely in a class of its own. ( )
2 vote Waldstein | Mar 7, 2016 |
1. Whole Lotta Love
2. Heartbreaker
3. Communication Breakdown
4. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You
5. What Is And What Should Never Be
6. Thank You
7. I Can't Quit You Baby
8. Dazed And Confused
9. Your Time Is Gonna Come
10. Ramble On
11. Travelling Riverside Blues
12. Friends
13. Celebration Day
14. Hey Hey What Can I Do
15. White Summer/Black Mountain Side

1. Black Dog
2. Over The Hills And Far Away
3. Immigrant Song
4. Battle Of Evermore
5. Bron Y Aur Stomp
6. Tangerine
7. Going To California
8. Since I've Been Loving You
9. D'yer Mak'er
10. Gallows Pole
11. Custard Pie
12. Misty Mountain Hop
13. Rock 'n' Roll
14. Rain Song
15. Stairway To Heaven

1. Kashmir
2. Trampled Under Foot
3. For Your Life
4. No Quarter
5. Dancing Days
6. When The Levee Breaks
7. Achilles Last Stand
8. Song Remains The Same
9. Ten Years Gone
10. In My Time Of Dying

1. In The Evening
2. Candy Store Rock
3. Ocean
4. Ozone Baby
5. Houses Of The Holy
6. Wearing And Tearing
7. Poor Tom
8. Nobody's Fault But Mine
9. Fool In The Rain
10. In The Light
11. Wanton Song
12. Moby Dick/Bonzo's Montreux
13. I'm Gonna Crawl
14. All My Love
  danbrady | Nov 4, 2007 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Led Zeppelinautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Horkins, TonyIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin is the first and only official illustrated book to be produced in collaboration with the members of the band. Celebrating 50 years since their formation, it covers the group's unparalleled musical career and features photographs of Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham on and offstage, in candid moments and in the recording studio. This definitive 368-page volume includes unseen photographs and artwork from the Led Zeppelin archives and contributions from photographers around the world.

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