Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

History: A Very Short Introduction de John…
Carregando...

History: A Very Short Introduction (original: 2000; edição: 2000)

de John H. Arnold (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
685925,227 (3.84)14
"Do historians reconstruct the truth or simply tell stories? This book suggests that they do both, and that the balance between 'truth' and 'story' is tremendously important to history. Taking us from the fabulous tales of ancient Greek historians to the varied approaches of modern professionals, History: A Very Short Introduction illuminates our relationship to the past by making us aware of how 'history' has changed as a subject. Concepts such as periodization and causation are discussed, but not in a dry or abstract fashion. Instead, the book works through particular historical examples - including a medieval murderer, a seventeenth-century colonist, and an ex-slave woman - to illustrate and explain the ways in which we study and understand history, giving the reader a sense of the excitement of discovering not only the past, but also ourselves."--BOOK JACKET.… (mais)
Membro:AndrewRPhillips
Título:History: A Very Short Introduction
Autores:John H. Arnold (Autor)
Informação:(2000)
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Very Short Introduction
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Reference, History

Detalhes da Obra

History: A Very Short Introduction de John H. Arnold (2000)

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 14 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
HISTORY, A Very Short Introduction, by John H. Arnold (pp 123). This an utterly fascinating explanation of history, how it’s written, who writes it, what it’s based on, and so much more. HISTORY is fascinating in part because of the polarization of viewpoints in our daily lives, including current day journalism and books we read written by authors who explain what’s happening, invariably from one or another viewpoint. We often think of history as a recitation of mostly verifiable facts put into a logical (and correct) order, and only slightly if at all influenced by the historian. Arnold contends—accurately in my opinion—few of the facts we rely on, at least with respect to human behavior (as opposed to the existence of a physical artifact), is truly verifiable. All history is written for a purpose, by someone with a perspective, based on a finite number of historical occurrences, and with gaps in knowledge that require guessing by each author. Historical facts or events are necessarily seen amidst incomplete contexts. The author illustrates many of his assertions by using several historical personages (some widely know, others less so) and events in which they were involved. To illustrate part of the difficulty of writing history, let alone reading it and trying to decide what is true irrespective of the author’s beliefs, I give the following example. (The U.S. Civil War is not mentioned in this book.)

Think of a famous general (in part because we often read about history as it was influenced or even directed by near-mythical heroes) who has just won a major battle. An author may assert that generalship determined the outcome. However, what might another historian emphasize in explaining the outcome of that conflict? Possibly the foe’s abysmal generalship was determinative, and not the hero’s. Other factors that might have been important and deserve emphasis could be: weather, weaponry, defenses, logistics (who was well fed and had enough bullets), the morale of the soldiers, illness and disease of combatants, political forces (why the battle was being fought), terrain, exhaustion of key players, everything leading up to the battle, and so much more. Without some idea of other key elements, we have to accept the historians assertion that McClellan outgeneraled Lee. Of course, good historians take into account other factors, but did they emphasize or even know about the most influential?

Was the “win” unfair because it was influenced by captured battle plans? Did the fact that casualties were horrific on both sides make it effectively a loss for both? Did the fact it gave Lincoln the victory he needed to issue the emancipation make it a resounding victory? Did the fact that Lee, who was heavily outnumbered, retreated an continued fighting for two years make it a loss for the Union? Did the winning general’s subsequent removal because of poor performance affect one’s view of the outcome? There are lots of opinions out there, but which is the best conclusion?

And that’s history. ( )
  wildh2o | Jul 10, 2021 |
A lot of textbooks, when discussing literary genres, use a sentence which can be summarized as "Herodotus invented history". The first time I saw it I was confused by two things - how history can be considered literature (we were talking about literary genres after all) and how can history be invented - it had always been there... Arnold covers both of these topics and a lot more in his excellent introduction to history.

History can mean a lot of things - it can be the story of what happened, it can be the writing about it, it can be the research of it or even History - that almost force that governs everyone's life. Arnold explores all of those meanings and connects them in a way that shows that as different as they can be, they are all the sides of the same coin. And he does that with the oldest weapon in a historian's arsenal - by telling us stories.

The book is an overview of the development and current state of historiography and history but instead of just introducing us to the different people, methods and controversies, Arnold uses real tales from the past and then shows how they were used (and abused) and reported by historians in different times. The book starts with a murder, loops back to catch up with the Greeks and then moves swiftly through history to get to where we are now. It is a short book so you would not think that this many stories and lives (and pictures) would fit and somehow they do. Some of the writing can get a bit too academic but even when it does, it has a purpose.

A lot of what the book deals with is the changing perception of what truth and history are and how connected they must be. It is fascinating to see how the way history was written shifts between its different branches - from political to social, from specialized to general and back again. All of the examples are from European and US histories which made me wonder how would this book read if it was done by the authors from another part of the word, using their own history to draw both the examples and what they signify. Most of them are from the English-language perspective although there are a few notes about the French historians and how they differ from the English language ones. It would have been fascinating to have a lot more examples both from continental Europe and from around the world. But then writing a unified history of the history of history will require a lot more pages. And this book, exactly as is, is a good enough introduction for an English language speaker. ( )
1 vote AnnieMod | Feb 18, 2021 |
After a discussion of how history developed from Nabonidus's archaeological excavations and Herodotus's writings down to Ranke at the end of the 19th century, we look at historians in action: how they approach sources and choose what sources to approach. Lastly the book considers why people want to do history. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Sep 12, 2014 |
Een heel dun, maar heel knap boekje dat geschiedschrijving vooral vanuit de praktijk benadert. Staat gelukkig heel ver van het bij ons nog altijd gevolgde positivisme en weet de moeilijke, maar razend boeiende taak van historici goed te omschrijven (en te relativeren). ( )
  bookomaniac | Feb 8, 2014 |
This was the intro text in my history course, and it lives up to its title. ( )
  cargocontainer | Apr 12, 2012 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Mum, Dad, Ruth, and Victoria
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
There are perhaps three kinds of books one can write on the subject of 'history' in general.  (Preface)
Here is a true story.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Do historians reconstruct the truth or simply tell stories? This book suggests that they do both, and that the balance between 'truth' and 'story' is tremendously important to history. Taking us from the fabulous tales of ancient Greek historians to the varied approaches of modern professionals, History: A Very Short Introduction illuminates our relationship to the past by making us aware of how 'history' has changed as a subject. Concepts such as periodization and causation are discussed, but not in a dry or abstract fashion. Instead, the book works through particular historical examples - including a medieval murderer, a seventeenth-century colonist, and an ex-slave woman - to illustrate and explain the ways in which we study and understand history, giving the reader a sense of the excitement of discovering not only the past, but also ourselves."--BOOK JACKET.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.84)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 18
3.5 9
4 26
4.5 4
5 14

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,565,682 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível