Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Life of Pi (2001)

de Yann Martel

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
43,346101140 (3.9)3 / 1313
Martel's novel tells the story of Pi--short for Piscine--an unusual boy raised in a zoo in India. Pi's father decides to move the family to live in Canada and sell the animals to the great zoos of America. The ship taking them across the Pacific sinks and Pi finds himself the sole human survivor on a lifeboat with a hyena, an orangutan, a zebra with a broken leg and Bengal tiger called Richard Parker. Life of Pi brings together many themes including religion, zoology, fear, and sheer tenacity. This is a funny, wise, and highly original look at what it means to be human.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porRini55, MichelleCarpenter, biblioteca privada, thatnerd, MelAbraham, ClarendonLibrary, Jopalacios, Huili-G
  1. 92
    Kafka on the Shore de Haruki Murakami (tandah)
  2. 70
    The Elephant's Journey de José Saramago (jordantaylor)
    jordantaylor: Both books involve an exotic animal (a tiger and an elephant) and a young man who journeys with them. Both have a spiritual undertone.
  3. 137
    Siddhartha de Hermann Hesse (JFDR)
  4. 40
    Lost in the Barrens de Farley Mowat (Bcteagirl)
    Bcteagirl: Both are Canadian survival stories, involve animals, are dark at times but never depressing.
  5. 30
    The Tiger's Wife de Téa Obreht (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both books contain elements of magical realism and tigers!
  6. 52
    Mister Pip de Lloyd Jones (Booksloth)
  7. 52
    O Senhor das Moscas de William Golding (Hedgepeth)
  8. 31
    Mr. Vertigo de Paul Auster (Smiler69)
  9. 10
    Incendiary de Chris Cleave (LDVoorberg)
    LDVoorberg: Both are graphic stories about (in part) how people deal with trauma. Narrative style is also similar.
  10. 10
    The Elephant Keeper de Christopher Nicholson (Booksloth)
  11. 22
    In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex de Nathaniel Philbrick (BIzard)
  12. 11
    Max and the Cats de Moacyr Scliar (JGKC)
  13. 11
    We Bought a Zoo de Benjamin Mee (Smiler69)
  14. 44
    The Master and Margarita de Mikhail Bulgakov (Smiler69)
  15. 00
    The Dolphin People: A Novel (P.S.) de Torsten Krol (Booksloth)
  16. 11
    From the Mouth of the Whale de Sjón (rrmmff2000)
  17. 00
    I Am an Executioner: Love Stories de Rajesh Parameswaran (FFortuna)
  18. 12
    Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption de Laura Hillenbrand (sipthereader)
    sipthereader: A true story of survival at sea.
  19. 01
    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time de Mark Haddon (sturlington)
  20. 01
    Nothing de Janne Teller (Freiesleben)

(ver todas 28 recomendações)

Asia (1)
Canada (11)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

» Veja também 1313 menções

Inglês (970)  Holandês (14)  Espanhol (5)  Italiano (4)  Alemão (4)  Sueco (3)  Francês (3)  Finlandês (2)  Catalão (1)  Russo (1)  Húngaro (1)  Norueguês (1)  Todos os idiomas (1,009)
Mostrando 1-5 de 1009 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book took a really long time for me to get into, but once it picked up, it was really hard to put down. All in all, a good read. ( )
  thatnerd | Mar 2, 2024 |
Unlike majority of the books I've read this year, which I sought after and bought, this book found me. I stumbled across it in a coffee shop which offered customers free books. And I am forever grateful for that coffee shop. Like most people my age, this book is not as popular as the movie and I've seen the movie before. So I pretty much knew the story and I am someone who doesn't enjoy spoilers. However, I decided to give this book a go since the memory of the movie was quite faded in my mind and therefore I could not recall all the details of the story accurately. That was a great decision on my part.

In short, this book absolutely blew me out of the water (pun intended). Every page was as interesting as the last and it was such an absolute pleasure to read. The themes of god, religion, life and death were never overdrawn and every element of the novel seemed to be in balance without being given too much or too little attention, which in turn accentuated the overall plot. Lot of the novels that I have read this year focused on literary complexity which needs to be dissected in order for the average reader to wrap their heads around the story and although complexity is admirable, the author often sacrifices the reading experience for it. But the author of this novel did nothing of that sort, he used direct and concise words without adding unnecessary complexity. That is not to say there is no literary complexity at all; there is plenty of space for detailed literary analysis. This novel also has a very compelling story-telling which makes it a bliss to read.

The novel ends with an unusual cliffhanger where the readers are offered the choice between two completely different stories. Neither of those stories will change the overall ending of the novel, but either, will topple the experience of the novel on its head and the feeling left behind.

I would highly recommend this novel to everyone, even if you have watched the movie. The movie obviously skips out quite a few details - although not crucially important to the overall plot - that changes the overall pace and the tone of the story. The novel, without a doubt is the superior of the two. ( )
  buddhawithan.n | Feb 29, 2024 |
With 'The Life of Pi' Yann Martell tacitly promotes a positive, imaginative approach to life. The young protagonist Pi reveals his tale of a potentially tragic voyage across the sea in a life boat accompanied by a zebra, an orang-utan, a hyena and a Bengal tiger. After an inital slow start this compelling tale gathers speed from page 80 onwards and concludes with the greatest ending to a book I have read; a magnificent prestige. ( )
  Dzaowan | Feb 15, 2024 |
Very well written adventure story that begins after a hundred or so pages. A great survival tale if taken at its simplest level. ( )
  dlinnen | Feb 3, 2024 |
Life of Pi is a odd sort of fantasy, philosophy, adventure story that really puzzled me. Granted, I did read it in one go in about 2 hours in a sleepless haze, but nevertheless I still felt it was trying to be overtly meaningful in a counterproductive way.

Initially, I enjoyed the story. It is presented as a story by a writer who serves as a narrative voice. This writer interviews Piscine Molitor Patel, the eponymous Pi, named after a pool in France, in his middle age in Canada, with his story recalled in the first person.
The first part of the novel deals with Pi's childhood in Pondicherry, India. The two main foci are the zoo which Pi's father runs, and Pi's love of religion. Pi goes into great detail regarding the way in which the animals behave with each other - an example of rhinos cohabiting with goats is an oft-mentioned one in which animals care less for the actual species but more for the role they play. A great deal is dicussed regarding the morality of zoos and the illusion of the proud wild beast. Abruptly, we then suddenly have Pi discover that he wants to be Hindu, Christian and Muslim in quick succession, with little explanation for this devotion than "I just want to love God." I think Martel raises some provoking, albeit not original, points about atheism, morality and human behaviour - most of the time it is just not very subtle. My copy notes in the back that Martel thinks chapters 21 and 22 are particularly significant. All I really got from them is that love is a good thing, and that agnosticism (used incorrectly, as far as I can tell) is simply indecision.

The second part changes tack significantly, detailing Pi's adventures after the ship he is on sinks and he is stranded at sea on a lifeboat. I have to admit, the inital Author's Note fooled me slightly, so I was not wholly sure whether the novel was based on a real story or not. From my ignorant viewpoint, Martel presents an initially fairly realistic description of open-sea survival. Pi wakes in the storm and ends up the next day in the lifeboat with a hyena, a zebra, an orang-utan and a lion called Richard Parker. Pi has a period of fear and shock while the animals devour each other gruesomely, leaving only Richard Parker. Using supplies on the lifeboat, Pi is then able to build a small raft to be safe from the lion as well as collect fresh water and fish for food. Eventually though, he pulls on his zoo experience and establishes him as the dominant "lion" in their relationship. They travel, with vivid descriptions of storms, wildlife, and Pi's feelings. At one point, he notices Richard Parker has gone blind, and he soon follows. He comes across another castaway, who boards and tries to eat him but is mauled by Richard Parker. They then find some kind of floating acid algae tree island, which apparently lures fish to be dissolved and eaten. Eventually they find their way to Mexico.

I mentioned that I found the story initially convincingly realistic. I suspect the absurdity of Pi's adventures towards the end of the novel was intended as some kind of point - when being interrogated in hospital, Pi tells two versions of his story - one without animals and one with, the former being far more acceptable to the shipping company. Perhaps the point is that it doesn't matter whether it is true or not? Pi says only: "So it goes with God.". The events also seem to conspire at the end to make it impossible to check the veracity of Pi's story - Richard Parker disappears almost immediately on reaching land and the boat shows only some remnant bones.

Other things strike me as odd. The character of Mamaji, or Francis Adirubasamy, seems to me to exist purely to decieve the reader. His entire contribution is to provide a pretext for the author/narrator to find out about Pi's story, and to provide the provenance for Pi's curious name. Teasing related to the name also makes up a portion of the first part. Perhaps it is for "character development"? The initial author's note claims that the story will "make you believe in God", yet the initial focus on Pi's religious fervor disappears almost completely. Pi makes no thought comments about being driven by God, or inspired by God - he instead places the cause of his survival on Richard Parker. Equally, the "love" that is apparently so important is absent towards the end of the book - who is Pi going to love other than a tiger? Does God work through Richard Parker? Pi does have a delusional episode in which he "talks" to Richard Parker. My impression is that Pi survives because of his own determination, knowledge and tenacity - undermining this divine aspect somewhat. The tendency of Pi to hoard food following his experience - cookies in the hospital, canned goods in Canada - also seems to be meaningless or vague to the point of it.

My final impression is that Life of Pi is a novel which perhaps too hard to try something. Unlike say, Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, I felt like I was having meaning and depth forced at me rather than subtly. It makes it impossible to try to take the novel at face value as an adventure narrative - the fantastical island and similar events mean that the reader ends up having to try and decipher "deeper" meaning from the text. 3/5 for an enjoyable, albeit ultimately frustrating read. ( )
  Zedseayou | Jan 30, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 1009 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The story is engaging and the characters attractively zany. Piscine Molitor Patel (named after a family friend's favourite French swimming pool) grows up in Pondicherry, a French-speaking part of India, where his father runs the local zoo. Pi, Hindu-born, has a talent for faith and sees nothing wrong with being converted both to Islam and to Christianity. Pi and his brother understand animals intimately, but their father impresses on them the dangers of anthropomorphism: invade an animal's territory, and you will quickly find that nearly every creature is dangerous
adicionado por dovydas | editarThe Guardian, Aida Edemariam (Oct 23, 2002)
 
Granted, it may not qualify as ''a story that will make you believe in God,'' as one character describes it. But it could renew your faith in the ability of novelists to invest even the most outrageous scenario with plausible life -- although sticklers for literal realism, poor souls, will find much to carp at.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (30 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Martel, YannAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Adam, VikasNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Allié, ManfredTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Baardman, GerdaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bützow, HeleneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bridge, AndyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Castanyo, EduardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ching, JonIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Engen, BodilTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kempf-Allié, GabrieleTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Marshall, AlexanderNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Martel, EmileTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nubile, ClaraTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ottosson, MetaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Southwood, BiancaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stheeman, TjadineTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Targo, LindaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Torjanac, TomislavIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Woodman, JeffNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Prêmios

Distinctions

Notable Lists

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
à mes parents et à mon frère
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
My suffering left me sad and gloomy.
This book was born as I was hungry. (Author's Note)
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The reason death sticks so closely to life isn't biological necessity — it's envy. Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can. But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two of no importance, and gloom is but the passing shadow of a cloud.
Evil in the open is but evil from within that has been let out. The main battlefield for good is not the open ground of the public arena but the small clearing of each heart.
I know what you want. You want a story that won't surprise you. That will confirm what you already know. That won't make you see higher or further or differently. You want a flat story. An immobile story. You want dry, yeastless factuality.
Animals in the wild lead lives of compulsion and necessity within an unforgiving social hierarchy in an environment where the supply of fear is high and the supply of food is low and where territory must constantly be defended and parasites forever endured.
If you take two steps toward God, God runs toward you
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
This is the book. Please do not combine with the film.
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

Martel's novel tells the story of Pi--short for Piscine--an unusual boy raised in a zoo in India. Pi's father decides to move the family to live in Canada and sell the animals to the great zoos of America. The ship taking them across the Pacific sinks and Pi finds himself the sole human survivor on a lifeboat with a hyena, an orangutan, a zebra with a broken leg and Bengal tiger called Richard Parker. Life of Pi brings together many themes including religion, zoology, fear, and sheer tenacity. This is a funny, wise, and highly original look at what it means to be human.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Revisores inicias do LibraryThing

O livro de Yann Martel, Life of Pi, estava disponível em LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Current Discussions

OT - Suntup: Life of Pi em Folio Society Devotees

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.9)
0.5 28
1 337
1.5 26
2 671
2.5 145
3 2249
3.5 546
4 4333
4.5 569
5 3760

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

Canongate Books

3 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Canongate Books.

Edições: 184195392X, 1841958492, 1847676014

HighBridge

Uma edição deste livro foi publicada pela HighBridge.

» Página Web de informação sobre a editora

HighBridge Audio

Uma edição deste livro foi publicada pela HighBridge Audio.

» Página Web de informação sobre a editora

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 202,064,495 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível