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Snoop : what your stuff says about you de…
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Snoop : what your stuff says about you (original: 2008; edição: 2008)

de Sam Gosling

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7212922,837 (3.07)29
A provocative look at how our private spaces--from boardroom to bedroom--reveal our personalities. For ten years psychologist Sam Gosling has been studying how people project (and protect) their inner selves. By exploring our private worlds (desks, bedrooms, even our clothes and our cars), he shows not only how we showcase our personalities in unexpected--and unplanned--ways, but also how we create personality in the first place, communicate it others, and interpret the world around us. When it comes to the most essential components of our personalities--from friendliness to flexibility--the things we own and the way we arrange them often say more about us than even our most intimate conversations. If you know what to look for, you can figure out how reliable a new boyfriend is by peeking into his medicine cabinet, or whether an employee is committed to her job by analyzing her cubicle.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:Raglanlibrary
Título:Snoop : what your stuff says about you
Autores:Sam Gosling
Informação:New York : Basic Books, 2008.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Book, Non fiction, Psychology, Sociology

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Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You de Sam Gosling (2008)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 29 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
While an interesting read, it was not as concrete as I expected it to be. The anecdotes about the studies the author had done were good and relevant but there was not as much substance to the book as I had hoped. ( )
  trile1000 | Jul 1, 2018 |
Okay read. Style is tough and on occasionally I got lost. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
I forget exactly where I heard about this book. I suspect it was either on The Happiness Project blog or the Non-Consumer Advocate blog. Either way I read about it, looked it up, and heady with the power of Lansing library's website, immediately placed a hold on a copy and was able to go pick it up a few days later. I love my new library!

Anyway, the book's subtitle is a tiny bit misleading. Of course you could read this book and figure out what other people might think of your stuff, but a more accurate subtitle would be "What you can figure out about other people by snooping through their stuff." I know, not quite as concise, is it?

What I found most interesting in this book were the kinds of conclusions people jump to in judging other people and which ones have a tendency to be correct and which are worthless. Like how people place too much importance on the face-to-face interview in hiring and admissions. Also interesting were the average personality differences between people in different parts of the country or of different political orientations. And the difference between decorations/possessions as outward-focused identity claims versus self-directed emotional regulators.

This was a diverting pop-psychology read. I certainly learned some things. I am glad, though, that I checked it out and didn't run right out and buy it. I don't know exactly what I was looking for in this book, but this ended up feeling just a little... light. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
[b:Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals|6953508|Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals|Hal Herzog|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1369453733s/6953508.jpg|7188492] says that this book says that our refrigerators *don't* reveal much about us. Um, that simply can't be right - of course a person who has only fresh celery and wine is a different person than one who has ancient takeout leftovers....

Ok, well, then I read the book anyway. And the deal is that you've got to put the information from the 'fridge in context with the other clues in the home of the person being judged. And you've got to believe that relating the clues to the Big Five Personality Traits (that psychology academics are so enamored by) is the main thing that matters.

I personally disagree with that basic premise. For one thing, when those Big Five are broken down into facets, some facets of each apply to me and others don't. Then the author admits that most research uses the generalized term and doesn't even look at the facets, oversimplifying an already simple labeling system. So consider, for example, that I score one of the questions related to Agreeableness very highly. I also score its converse very highly. So, am I agreeable or not? 'Sometimes' isn't an option.

I also have the same complaint about this book that I do most of the other psychology and neuroscience books I read. Using college students as subjects does *not* give you an understanding of the general public!

For one thing, he *never* talked about shared bedrooms. The owner of that space was either female, or gay male, or male who had had an overnight guest - it was never a long-married couple. I guess it's too hard to learn anything about the characters of people using a shared space. :snark:

Well, if you're trying to figure out whether this guy you're on a second date with is worthy of intimacy, I guess you're not visiting the bedroom of a married couple. But still, the book could have been more than 'know people better quicker by knowing what to look for in their dorm rooms.' I wish it had been.

There are some other great reviews here on GR about this book - I recommend you read them, whether or not you're planning to read the book itself. You'll probably learn more from them, than from the book.

ETA: Thank you to the generous folk who liked my review already, as I wrote it upon finishing the book. You prompted me to look carefully at it, and realize that it was full of elliptical sentences, poor grammar, weak seques... and today, Jan/15, I did some serious revisions. I'd like to consider revising the star rating down to 2 stars, but I didn't write clearly enough about any plusses, or additional minuses, the book had for me, and it has been over three years since I read it, so I'll let it stay at 3 stars. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
It's important to note that the subtitle of this book reads, 'What your stuff says about you.' Which isn't exactly what the book is about - it's really about how behaviour intersects with personality. To the extent that the acquisition of goods, and how you relate to them, is about 'stuff' then yes. But it's your behaviours and choices, driven by your personality, that bring the stuff to you (or you to it) and dictates how you 'keep' it (tidy or messy, showy or hidden). Gosling doesn't miss this point, the interior of his book is very largely made up of theories of personality and behaviour - so much so that many reviewers have complained it's not about 'stuff' at all

Which goes to show that you shouldn't judge a book by its subtitle. Usually it's the case that the publisher has foisted it on the author, but in this case I think Gosling has to take the rap. Because in addition to being a serious professor who can't avoid tackling the real issues he's raising, he is a person who likes snooping, and I mean intrusively snooping where most of us would have drawn the line several yards back along. There's a serious aspect to this when you use it to validate psychological testing methods - for instance secretly filming subjects arriving to fill in a written psychological test and cross-correlating their 'body language' with the results from the test. But it is very dangerous ground, both ethically and logically.

As I started reading I got the impression that this was an essay masquerading as a book, but at the end I realized it was more like a thirteen week series of lectures built around an entertaining, but ultimately not-really-central theme. As psychology, and even as a case study in ethics, it is a challenging book, by which I mean to suggest that it is thought provoking even if you (as I did) disagree with much of what he's done with these ideas. If Gosling had been a professor of forensic science this might have been a much more tightly focussed book, and perhaps he should look for a co-author from that field for his inevitable follow-up best seller.

I'll forgive Gosling most of his assertions and glosses, however, for this one point that he does try to hammer home - most of what you think you understand about a person from what you observe about them is not true, and the fault lies with how you assemble your understanding of them. Essentially it's a caution about prejudices and an argument for making the effort to reach a deeper understanding. But not, and I repeat not, by going through their medicine cabinet while they're not looking. That, I'm afraid, says more about the person who is violating someone else's privacy, than it does about the person being snooped upon. And he does talk about the ethical way of going about 'getting to know someone', but he never seems to quite get the point that some things are - and ought to remain - private. ( )
  nandadevi | Dec 31, 2014 |
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A provocative look at how our private spaces--from boardroom to bedroom--reveal our personalities. For ten years psychologist Sam Gosling has been studying how people project (and protect) their inner selves. By exploring our private worlds (desks, bedrooms, even our clothes and our cars), he shows not only how we showcase our personalities in unexpected--and unplanned--ways, but also how we create personality in the first place, communicate it others, and interpret the world around us. When it comes to the most essential components of our personalities--from friendliness to flexibility--the things we own and the way we arrange them often say more about us than even our most intimate conversations. If you know what to look for, you can figure out how reliable a new boyfriend is by peeking into his medicine cabinet, or whether an employee is committed to her job by analyzing her cubicle.--From publisher description.

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