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Spin Control

de Chris Moriarty

Outros autores: Stephen Youll (Artista da capa)

Séries: Spin Series (2)

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4561055,702 (3.72)19
In this stunning follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel Spin State, Chris Moriarty depicts a grim future in which the final frontier may well be extinction. For as far-flung planets are terraformed and Earth's age-old conflicts are contracted out to AIs, humanity is losing the only war that counts: the war for survival. Call Arkady a clone with a conscience. Or call him a traitor. A member of the space-faring Syndicates, Arkady has defected to Israel with a hot commodity: a genetic weapon powerful enough to wipe out humanity. But Israel's not buying it. They're selling it--and Arkady--to the highest bidder. As the auction heats up, the Artificial Life Emancipation Front sends in Major Catherine Li. Already drummed out of the Peacekeepers for "war crimes," Li has now literally hooked up with an AI who has lived many lifetimes and shunted through many bodies. And while they each have their own definition of victory, together they have only one chance at survival. . . .… (mais)
  1. 00
    Spin State de Chris Moriarty (mummimamma)
    mummimamma: Loosely connected series
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I just love books like this. They mash together so many interesting things that finally my brain wakes and start digging without feeling of been pushed to do it. I don’t understand everything now, there are too many layers to described conflicts and I’m too far away from central context of this book. But what I really love is tons and tons of naturally sounding references to The Real. In this days where so many books try to be something else entirely, to shed anything that can relate them to surrounding reality, to let the reader feel like standing between worlds. Too much escapism these days. Not a bad thing per se but very tiring sometimes. Hoorah to the breath of fresh air and real connection. The greatest thing is that this book about different point of views. There are no character development or crazy plot devices. It’s all about how different people (including reader) view, feel and think about stuff they’ve got to deal with. ( )
  WorkLastDay | Dec 17, 2023 |
I don't know why I stuck with this book till the end. It was very difficult reading, and I really wound up understanding very little of it. I thought I'd remembered that the author's "Spin State" was very good and very heavy on the advanced physics and technology. This didn't have as much physics and technology to it. It did have too many people running around. And left too much unexplained along the way. ( )
  MarkLacy | May 29, 2022 |
April 20th, 2012, working on my review. Enviro-Chris will not be happy... ( )
  AZBob1951 | Oct 27, 2021 |
This is a loose sequel to Spin State, features many of the same characters, but its plot doesn’t follow exactly on from the earlier plot. There are references to earlier events, but Spin Control can be read without having read Spin State. That, however, is the least of its problems. And, to be fair, its major problem is hardly its fault, it’s something that recent events have made problematical. Because Spin Control is set mostly in Israel. And this is an Israel that’s back at war with the Palestinians. The treatment of the Palestinians is certainly sympathetic (if not overly lionised) – and the treatment of Americans, Moriarty’s nationality, certainly not – but there’s still that whiff of admiration for Israel that is endemic in US culture. Which is a shame, because there’s a pure science-fiction thread to the narrative that seems mostly wasted. On the one hand, you have a defector from the Syndicates (genetically-engineered sort of communist clones) who is taken to Jerusalem to sell his secrets to the highest bidder – Mossad, its Palestinian equivalent, or the Americans – and which drags in some of the surviving cast of Spin State. But it’s all a plot, of sorts, to uncover a Palestinian mole, called Absalom, within Mossad. On the other hand, told in flashback, there’s the story of that same defector as one of the survivors of a Syndicate survey mission to a terraformed world. But there’s something weird about what they find – not just the fact it has been terraformed, since most terraforming attempts by humanity have failed, but also because there are weird things happening in the DNA of the flora and fauna. And when the survey team all come down with a fever, they work out that it’s caused by a virus which is using biology as a “Turing soup”, a sort of computational engine seeking an optimal terraforming solution. However, there’s a side-effect to the fever… and when this is revealed… well, Absalom’s identity seems pretty trivial. The survey mission narrative is nicely done, even if first contact puzzle stories are a genre staple; and marrying it with a near-future spy thriller is a nice touch. The setting of the latter is handled well, and each side is treated sensitively, but time, and geopolitics, has imparted something of a whiff to the Israeli-set sections and it’s hard to read them in light of recent events, or indeed the reader’s existing sympathies in the situation. Moriarty has shown she’s not afraid of tackling difficult subjects, both sfnal and real-world, and she’s good at it. It’s a shame she’s not better known. ( )
  iansales | Sep 18, 2018 |
Started rereading this one for the 2nd time.

********

04.17.12 I initially gave this 3 stars, but upon my 2nd reading, I decided to bump it up to 4. I found that at first, I was too wrapped up in one thread of the story, but it's actually quite tertiary to the entire thing. Rereading it, I gained a special appreciation for the two main story threads. ( )
  fabooj | Feb 3, 2015 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Chris Moriartyautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Youll, StephenArtista da capaautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado

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In this stunning follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel Spin State, Chris Moriarty depicts a grim future in which the final frontier may well be extinction. For as far-flung planets are terraformed and Earth's age-old conflicts are contracted out to AIs, humanity is losing the only war that counts: the war for survival. Call Arkady a clone with a conscience. Or call him a traitor. A member of the space-faring Syndicates, Arkady has defected to Israel with a hot commodity: a genetic weapon powerful enough to wipe out humanity. But Israel's not buying it. They're selling it--and Arkady--to the highest bidder. As the auction heats up, the Artificial Life Emancipation Front sends in Major Catherine Li. Already drummed out of the Peacekeepers for "war crimes," Li has now literally hooked up with an AI who has lived many lifetimes and shunted through many bodies. And while they each have their own definition of victory, together they have only one chance at survival. . . .

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