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The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature,…
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The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Adventure, Commerce, and Obsession (edição: 2008)

de Adam Leith Gollner (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
297568,891 (3.7)3
Tasty, lethal, hallucinogenic, and medicinal--fruits have led nations into wars, fueled dictatorships, and even lured us into new worlds. Adam Leith Gollner weaves business, science, and travel into a narrative about one of earth's most desired foods. Readers will discover why, though countless exotic fruits exist in nature, only several dozen varieties are available in supermarkets. Gollner explores the political machinations of multinational fruit corporations, exposing the hidden alliances between agribusiness and government and what that means for public health. He traces the life of mass-produced fruits--how they are created, grown, and marketed--and he explores the underworld of fruits that are inaccessible, ignored, and even forbidden in the Western world. Peopled with a varied and bizarre cast of characters--from smugglers to explorers to inventors--this book unveils the hidden universe of fruit.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:reg_lt
Título:The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Adventure, Commerce, and Obsession
Autores:Adam Leith Gollner (Autor)
Informação:Scribner (2008), Edition: 1, 288 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:**
Etiquetas:non-fiction

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The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Adventure, Commerce, and Obsession de Adam Leith Gollner

Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, sheppardma, MichaelHagen, 98201Seed, tmennel1, JMAlexander, suicidebybooks, ginaruiz, swedezilla
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Exibindo 5 de 5
A fruity book about delicious fruit, rare fruit, people obsessed with fruit and the history of fruit.It was fun for the first chapter or two. I got skeptical when looked like it might end up as 300 pages of anecdotes. If you stick it out the material does broaden and get a little better, but this is never an amazing book. Its more like a collection of superficial magazine articles tacked together. The writing is average, it bounces around and doesn't flow well, and lastly the author sounds like a jerk. There is nothing worse for a book than when you start loathing the author and they've got themselves all up in the material. There are numerous cases where unflattering depictions of other people or their comments are shared even though they add no benefit and sound like they were told to the author with the expectation of privacy.I love all the wonderful fruits itemized, but this author doesn't do the topic justice and really needs a copy editor. It made me hungry too. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
There's a lot of fascinating information in this wildly discursive book. There's also a fair bit of meandering and repetition, which knocked my rating down some. It's worth a look but might be better skimmed than read. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
I have my doubts about the writing of this book, its supposed to be about people who go out looking for new fruits and their stories. Language, noughties' slang, like "two cougars" to describe women strikes a jarring note.

I have several fruits in my garden, or at least the bit of rainforest that is accessible the rest being too difficult and bushy to penetrate, that I do not have more than local names for. Sweet water, the pod of a tree with amazingly-perfumed flowers, that is like sucking cotton wool that has been soaked in ... sweet water. A peach-sized woody brown fruit with a bright peachy-orange interior that is apple-crunchy and sweet (I think this might be better ripe). Some tiny orange berry that comes in a lacy bract and tastes like the essence of a really good passion fruit. I wonder what they are, I'm hoping the book might tell me. ( )
  Petra.Xs | Apr 2, 2013 |
I'm sort of a fruit fanatic, so Adam Leith Gollner's The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Adventure, Commerce, and Obsession (Scribner) was a must-read for me. In the wake of other history/memoir/culinary travelogue books like those about salt, bananas, honey, &c., Gollner takes up the scrumptious topic of fruits (in all their mind-boggling variety). He visits tropical markets in search of delights we poor temperate Americans don't often have the pleasure of trying, profiles "rare fruit enthusiasts" from around the world, and offers up short capsule histories of fruit consumption, cultivation, and commodification. His cast of characters includes some members of fruit cults, a fruit detective, fruitarians (including the various splinter groups) and even Thomas Jefferson.

Gollner's quite critical of the modern fruit industry, calling our insipid grocery store offerings "Stepford fruits" and declaring "we're eating the shrapnel of a worldwide homogeneity bomb." Which, of course, we are. We want our fruits to be unbruised and long-lasting, and many of the best varieties simply don't travel well. Queen Victoria famously offered a knighthood to the person who could bring her a fresh mangosteen; Victoria never got to award that honor. A fresh mangosteen would probably be possible today, but it would still be costly (but if Gollner's to be believed, it might be worth it!). He also critiques some modern marketing techniques (but praises others, like those for the kiwi, the cranberry and the now-in-vogue "heirloom fruits") and weird projects (including the development of Grapples, an apple 'injected' with grape flavoring which sounds positively atrocious to me).

Having taste-tested many of the strange fruits he describes, Gollner is near his best when writing about those experiences. The smell of one particular durian, he writes, is like "undercooked peanut butter-mint omelets in body-odor sauce" (yum?). Most of them sound much better than that, I promise - reading this book made me hypercritical even of the comparatively tasty pears and plums I was snacking on at the time.

A hunger-inducing book, with an important message about what we eat and why. Well worth a read.

http://philobiblos.blogspot.com/2008/07/book-review-fruit-hunters.html ( )
4 vote JBD1 | Jul 21, 2008 |
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Tasty, lethal, hallucinogenic, and medicinal--fruits have led nations into wars, fueled dictatorships, and even lured us into new worlds. Adam Leith Gollner weaves business, science, and travel into a narrative about one of earth's most desired foods. Readers will discover why, though countless exotic fruits exist in nature, only several dozen varieties are available in supermarkets. Gollner explores the political machinations of multinational fruit corporations, exposing the hidden alliances between agribusiness and government and what that means for public health. He traces the life of mass-produced fruits--how they are created, grown, and marketed--and he explores the underworld of fruits that are inaccessible, ignored, and even forbidden in the Western world. Peopled with a varied and bizarre cast of characters--from smugglers to explorers to inventors--this book unveils the hidden universe of fruit.--From publisher description.

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