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A Canticle for Leibowitz de Walter M. Miller…
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A Canticle for Leibowitz (original: 1959; edição: 1984)

de Walter M. Miller Jr.

Séries: Leibowitz (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
10,076279532 (3.95)1 / 472
Many years after a nuclear war, scholars seeking the old learning come to a monastery where much knowledge has been preserved.
Membro:eulensteak
Título:A Canticle for Leibowitz
Autores:Walter M. Miller Jr.
Informação:Bantam Spectra (1984), Edition: paperback, Mass Market Paperback, 368 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

A Canticle for Leibowitz de Jr. Walter M. Miller (Author) (1959)

Adicionado recentemente porBRCC_Library, mindbat, xcountryben, biblioteca privada, rafsesm, KovolKenai, Scottiewhitter, john257hopper, Burento
Bibliotecas HistóricasWalker Percy
1960s (7)
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Inglês (273)  Francês (3)  Finlandês (1)  Italiano (1)  Hebraico (1)  Todos os idiomas (279)
Mostrando 1-5 de 279 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I still am not sure what to think of this book. I can't decide if I should be in despair for the repetitive stupidity of mankind, or if I should have hope that maybe humankind will stop being such idiots. The author mixes religion with secularism. There is humor and irony in the Sainthood of Leibowitz. There are no adequate way to describe this story, other than it follows the Monks of the Order of St. Leibowitz from near it's founding at an Abbey in Utah through to the interesting ending of this story. It was a hard book to read in that oftimes I was totally disgusted with humanity and those in power. I still don't know what to think. Even though it was written in 1959, the behavior of our governments and those wielding power have not changed. They are still power hungry morons not caring a bit about those who try to do right. ( )
  Raspberrymocha | Jun 11, 2021 |
A classic, and rightly so. Beautiful and melancholic writing on the end of the world and what comes next. ( )
  francoisvigneault | May 17, 2021 |
I was probably expecting some more Dan Simmons esque weirdness, vs what I got a pretty bog-standard sci-fi morality play. ( )
  Raykoda3 | May 8, 2021 |
[Full review here: http://wetwiring.wordpress.com/2012/04/08/a-canticle-for-leibowitz-religion-and-...

Strange. It's consistently interesting in its depiction of a post-apocalyptic society, until about halfway through the "Fiat Voluntas Tua" section. Up to this point it had been fairly dispassionate and interesting examination of the role of a monastery in such a society, one by turns ignorant and fearful of scientific progress, as a repository of the isolated and frayed threads of knowledge. Then there is a swerve into a narrative on the abuse secular powers inevitably make of science, one which is crowd-pleasingly cynical, marking this book as a product of the Cold War.

Reading this immediately after Neal Stephenson's Anathem, I found in it many prefigurations of what Stephenson would examine from a more rigorous perspective. Disappointingly, the last section of Canticle loses it completely, as the author's Catholicism takes over. This part of the plot makes little sense unless you happen to agree with that Church's brutal (but according to its own theological premises, logical) theodicy, and seems to function as little more than an apologia for Miller's beliefs. Another author might have attempted to present Zerchi's position in the abstract, thus giving the sceptical reader something to engage with. Miller abdicates such a difficult task, and instead implies that if you do not agree with his position (through the mouthpiece of Zerchi) you are not just compromised, but guilty.

As a genre work, it is an important part of the post-apocalyptic canon. As literature, it is decidedly third-rate, and buckles under the weight of its leaden ironies. I cannot help but feel it is so highly revered because it engages - crudely - with some spiritual themes often absent from SF. An author such as Stephenson is capable of engaging with such themes, without compromising the hard-headedness for which he is held in such high regard. In contrast, Miller is is lobotomized. In terms of literature on the whole, aside from the SF genre, Hesse's Glass Bead Game manages to consider the role of knowledge in the abstract (admittedly sans apocalypse) and yet you don't feel that you are being bashed over the head.


Overall, it is an interesting effort, but put in the context of both later SF, and literature in general, it's not much more than a period piece. ( )
  agtgibson | Jan 5, 2021 |
This title from the NPR Top 100 Science Fiction and Fantasy list came highly recommended from my coworkers, and I found it to be well deserving of the praise. Divided into three sections, the novel begins in a post-nuclear-apocalyptic world where monks and the Church work to preserve memories and relics of the time before. A young novice is out on a vision quest of sorts in the deserts of Utah, which are notorious for wolves and grotesque disfigured monsters (humans born with defects due to the nuclear fallout), and encounters a strange pilgrim who can read and write. The novice later stumbles upon an old abandoned fallout shelter, which seems to him like a holy ground, full of artifacts and ancient writings harkening back to the days of Leibowitz, the saint for whom his order is named. This discovery is received with mixed reactions at the monastery, but the novice believes fervently that he was meant to make this discovery, and spends many long years labouring over the documents found. In the second section, the society is beginning to experiment with technology, and the Brothers of Saint Leibowitz are working on a machine to produce artificial light. In the third section, nuclear warfare has once again returned, and the monastery, a place of refuge, is preparing to evacuate in the face of total annihilation.

Although this book is now over fifty years old, it has aged gracefully, and is still very readable. The first section is the longest, and most engrossing; however, the third section poses a number of questions regarding conduct in the face of destruction, as well as ethics and making decisions in spite of persecution. Mary Doria Russell wrote the introduction to the edition I read, and I would definitely recommend it to fans of her work, as well as those who enjoy Sharon Shinn’s Samaria series. ( )
  resoundingjoy | Jan 1, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (22 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Miller, Walter M., Jr.Autorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Feck, LouArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jones, PeterArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Marosz, JonathanNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Picacio, JohnArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rambelli, RobertaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Russell, Mary DoriaIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Serrano, ErvinDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Viskupic, GaryArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Weiner, TomNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Brother Francis Gerard of Utah might never have discovered the blessed documents, had it not been for the pilgrim with girded loins who appeared during that young novice's Lenten fast in the desert.
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There were spaceships again in that century, and the ships were manned by fuzzy impossibilities that walked on two legs and sprouted tufts of hair in unlikely anatomical regions. They were a garrulous kind. They belonged to a race quite capable of admiring its own image in a mirror, and equally capable of cutting its own throat before the alter of some tribal god, such as the deity of Daily Shaving. It was a species which often considered itself to be, basically, a race of divinely inspired tool makers; any intelligent entity from Arcturus would instantly have perceived them to be, basically, a race of impassioned after-dinner speechmakers.
“The closer men came to perfecting for themselves a paradise, the more impatient they seemed to become with it, and with themselves as well. They made a garden of pleasure, and became progressively more miserable with it as it grew into richness and power and beauty; for then, perhaps, it was easier for them to see that something was missing in the garden, some tree or shrub that would not grow. When the world was in darkness and wretchedness, it could believe in perfection and yearn for it. But when the world became bright with reason and riches, it began to sense the narrowness of the needle’s eye, and that rankled for a world no longer willing to believe or yearn. Well, they were going to destroy it again, were they-this garden Earth, civilized and knowing, to be torn apart again that Man might hope again in wretched darkness.” (page 285)
Brother Francis was copying only the body of the text onto new parchment, leaving spaces for the splendid capitals and margins as wide as the text lines. Other craftsmen would fill in riots of colour around his simply inked copy and would construct the pictorial capitals.
Brother Francis found the finest available lambskin and spent several weeks of his spare time at curing it and stretching it and stoning it to a perfect surface, which he eventually bleached to a snowy whiteness.
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Miller published a short story in 1955 with this title. Please do not combine the novel with the short story.
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