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Reader By Bernhard Schlink de -Author-
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Reader By Bernhard Schlink (original: 1995; edição: 1998)

de -Author- (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
12,268379396 (3.7)454
For 15-year-old Michael Berg, a chance meeting with an older woman leads to far more than he ever imagined. The woman in question is Hanna, and before long they embark on a passionate, clandestine love affair which leaves Michael both euphoric and confused. For Hanna is not all she seems. Years later, as a law student observing a trial in Germany, Michael is shocked to realize that the person in the dock is Hanna. The woman he had loved is a criminal. Much about her behaviour during the trial does not make sense. But then suddenly, and terribly, it does - Hanna is not only obliged to answer for a horrible crime, she is also desperately concealing an even deeper secret. 'A tender, horrifying novel that shows blazingly well how the Holocaust should be dealt with in fiction.… (mais)
Membro:KevinLa
Título:Reader By Bernhard Schlink
Autores:-Author- (Autor)
Informação:Paperback (1998), Edition: 14681st
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

The Reader de Bernhard Schlink (1995)

Adicionado recentemente porMJ_McBride, banrions, Voigtschild, biblioteca privada, tpflug, IreneLM, SanctiSpiritus, Bakerbecky, Biblio-Ortenburg
Bibliotecas HistóricasJuice Leskinen
  1. 112
    The Book Thief de Markus Zusak (bookcrazyblog, lucyknows)
    bookcrazyblog: Though book thief is understood to be Teen-read, it is deep and enthralling. If you liked The Reader for anything beyond its sensuality in the first part, you will love Book Thief
    lucyknows: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak may linked with The Reader by Bernhard Schlink using the themes of reading, Nazi Germany and death. You could also pair it with the graphic novel Maus by Art Spiegelman. Atonement by Ian McEwan could work as well because of the young protagonists, war, and reading.… (mais)
  2. 20
    In My Brother's Shadow: A Life and Death in the SS de Uwe Timm (Tinwara)
    Tinwara: Autobiographical account that also deals with the post war generation in Germany, trying to come to an understanding of how loved persons can make the wrong decisions.
  3. 10
    Those Who Save Us de Jenna Blum (bnbookgirl)
    bnbookgirl: One of my top ten fav's.
  4. 10
    Without Blood de Alessandro Baricco (2810michael)
  5. 10
    Let Me Go de Helga Schneider (Booksloth)
  6. 00
    Julia de Otto de Kat (charl08)
    charl08: Both novels deal with the after effects of Nazism, felt many years after the war ends.
  7. 00
    The Travels of Daniel Ascher de Déborah Lévy-Bertherat (OneOfDem)
  8. 00
    The Girl at the Lion d'Or de Sebastian Faulks (MissBrangwen)
  9. 00
    A Child of Hitler de Alfons Heck (AlisonY)
    AlisonY: Written by a German child who became a high-ranking leader of the Hitler Youth, this autobiography picks up on the theme from 'The Reader' about what made some people join the Nazi party
  10. 00
    Before I Knew Him de Anna Ralph (1Owlette)
  11. 11
    Ethan Frome de Edith Wharton (1Owlette)
  12. 11
    Enduring Love de Ian McEwan (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: The Reader could be successfully paired with Enduring Love for English Studies. In addition either book could also be be paired with the film The Talented Mr Ripley under the theme of obsession
  13. 23
    Close Range de Annie Proulx (1Owlette)
    1Owlette: Although very different in many ways, [The Reader] and [Brokeback Mountain] are both similarly devastating and concentrated in their impact.
  14. 01
    Beatrice and Virgil de Yann Martel (Cecilturtle)
  15. 01
    Berlin de Pierre Frei (Johanna11)
    Johanna11: Although the books are very different in many respects, both are about Berlin after WWII and about Germans during WWII and after.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 377 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I had seen the movie previous to reading the novel. If you haven't seen it, I urge you to do so, as it is incredibly well acted.

For those who don't know, the story is narrated by a man named Michael Berg. It is separated into three different sections. The first describing a fifteen year old Michael's relationship with a thirty-six year old woman named Hanna. The second, is the trial for Nazi war crimes where Michael is a law student observing. He realizes that Hanna is on trial for being a guard at a camp where women burned to death in a fire. The third, is his life after and dealing with the effect Hanna had on him. I don't want to say too much more and give anything away.

I like the way this author writes. It is simple, yet profound. He draws you in and makes you care about the characters and what is happening to them.

I would definitely recommend this novel to anyone. Its though provoking, well written, full of interesting characters, and tells an important story. ( )
  banrions | Dec 7, 2021 |
If We Can’t Forgive, Can We Understand?

After you read Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader, you won’t be surprised that upon publication controversy surrounded it, and with each new reader certainly still does. That’s because the novel stands as a metaphor for two generations of Germans, one that lived through and participated actively or passively in the Holocaust, the second that followed left to reconcile their love of family and what members did or did not do in Nazi Germany.

Schlink structures the novel as a three act drama. In the first act, Michael Berg, a boy of 15 in 1958, falls ill. A streetcar conductor, Hanna Schmitz, 36, cleans him up and helps him home. After recovering, Michael searches her out to thank her. They start an affair and he falls in love with her. When Hanna reveals that she enjoys being read to, he begins reading to her after their sexual encounters. The relationship proves tumultuous. Finally, she leaves him abruptly with no forwarding information.

The second act picks up in the mid-60s, with Michael in law school. As part of a research project, he and his class attend a war crimes trial. On trial are female guards that had locked 300 Jewish women from Auschwitz in a church during an Allied bombing raid. When the church caught fire, none of the guards opened the locked doors to free the women, who, as a result, burned to death. A survivor wrote a book about the incident. Among the defendants is Hanna. Not only was she a guard, she was a member of the Waffen-SS. This plunges Michael into a moral dilemma and raises all kinds of questions about moral responsibility and amorality, about awareness and willful ignorance. Among other things, he realizes that Hanna is illiterate in a literate nation, that it is her greatest shame to be hidden at all costs, a metaphorical casting of an entire nation. She takes on the full brunt of responsibly for the incident rather than expose her illiteracy, which could be interpreted as a passive nation shamed by their inaction or acceptance of circumstances. In the end, Hanna receives the harshest prison sentence.

With the third act, many years have passed and much has transpired in Michael’s life. He is a successful historian of law; he has married and divorced; he has a daughter. Through all this, he cannot get Hanna out of his mind. He begins sending her recordings of books he had read into a recorder. He also discovers that she has taught herself to read, and she is reading accounts of the Holocaust written by survivors. The prison warden contacts Micheal as her release date approaches. He makes arrangements for an apartment and a job for her. The release date, however, never arrives. Hanna hangs herself. Her last request is for Michael to give all her money to the survivor of the church fire, the author. He travels to New York after a conference to meet the woman. He treats her as a confessor, opening up about his life with family, wife, and Hanna. While expressing understanding, the woman refuses the money because it feels like absolution to her and she can’t grant that. He gives the money to a Jewish charity combating illiteracy.

Much can be read into this novel and has been. And not all readers will be satisfied by any one explanation. But the metaphor of generational conflict does seems most satisfying. Schlink reduces this down to the relationship between young Michael and older Hanna, people from the two generations. They love each other. He can’t fully understand her, why she lives as she does, why she would turn down a promotion, why she would run away. Later, he has to understand how she could have done what she had done, why she decided to join the Waffen-SS instead of take a promotion, why her illiteracy, a stand-in for the moral illiteracy of the German people, should be a reason or excuse, why she felt so misunderstood (again, as some in her generation did). This is the strength of the novel, the questions it raises and the debate it sets off a reader’s mind. Is this black and white, this not that, or is there some ambiguity here? Can we understand why Germans went along with mass murder, at the least? Is the debate dead, as it seems for Michael in the end when he visits Hanna’s grave for one time and never again? New readers will wrestle with their own conflicted feelings, that is certain.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
If We Can’t Forgive, Can We Understand?

After you read Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader, you won’t be surprised that upon publication controversy surrounded it, and with each new reader certainly still does. That’s because the novel stands as a metaphor for two generations of Germans, one that lived through and participated actively or passively in the Holocaust, the second that followed left to reconcile their love of family and what members did or did not do in Nazi Germany.

Schlink structures the novel as a three act drama. In the first act, Michael Berg, a boy of 15 in 1958, falls ill. A streetcar conductor, Hanna Schmitz, 36, cleans him up and helps him home. After recovering, Michael searches her out to thank her. They start an affair and he falls in love with her. When Hanna reveals that she enjoys being read to, he begins reading to her after their sexual encounters. The relationship proves tumultuous. Finally, she leaves him abruptly with no forwarding information.

The second act picks up in the mid-60s, with Michael in law school. As part of a research project, he and his class attend a war crimes trial. On trial are female guards that had locked 300 Jewish women from Auschwitz in a church during an Allied bombing raid. When the church caught fire, none of the guards opened the locked doors to free the women, who, as a result, burned to death. A survivor wrote a book about the incident. Among the defendants is Hanna. Not only was she a guard, she was a member of the Waffen-SS. This plunges Michael into a moral dilemma and raises all kinds of questions about moral responsibility and amorality, about awareness and willful ignorance. Among other things, he realizes that Hanna is illiterate in a literate nation, that it is her greatest shame to be hidden at all costs, a metaphorical casting of an entire nation. She takes on the full brunt of responsibly for the incident rather than expose her illiteracy, which could be interpreted as a passive nation shamed by their inaction or acceptance of circumstances. In the end, Hanna receives the harshest prison sentence.

With the third act, many years have passed and much has transpired in Michael’s life. He is a successful historian of law; he has married and divorced; he has a daughter. Through all this, he cannot get Hanna out of his mind. He begins sending her recordings of books he had read into a recorder. He also discovers that she has taught herself to read, and she is reading accounts of the Holocaust written by survivors. The prison warden contacts Micheal as her release date approaches. He makes arrangements for an apartment and a job for her. The release date, however, never arrives. Hanna hangs herself. Her last request is for Michael to give all her money to the survivor of the church fire, the author. He travels to New York after a conference to meet the woman. He treats her as a confessor, opening up about his life with family, wife, and Hanna. While expressing understanding, the woman refuses the money because it feels like absolution to her and she can’t grant that. He gives the money to a Jewish charity combating illiteracy.

Much can be read into this novel and has been. And not all readers will be satisfied by any one explanation. But the metaphor of generational conflict does seems most satisfying. Schlink reduces this down to the relationship between young Michael and older Hanna, people from the two generations. They love each other. He can’t fully understand her, why she lives as she does, why she would turn down a promotion, why she would run away. Later, he has to understand how she could have done what she had done, why she decided to join the Waffen-SS instead of take a promotion, why her illiteracy, a stand-in for the moral illiteracy of the German people, should be a reason or excuse, why she felt so misunderstood (again, as some in her generation did). This is the strength of the novel, the questions it raises and the debate it sets off a reader’s mind. Is this black and white, this not that, or is there some ambiguity here? Can we understand why Germans went along with mass murder, at the least? Is the debate dead, as it seems for Michael in the end when he visits Hanna’s grave for one time and never again? New readers will wrestle with their own conflicted feelings, that is certain.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Der 15-jährige Michael Berg lernt Ende der 1950er die rund 20 Jahre ältere Straßenbahnfahrerin Hanna Schmitz kennen. zwischen den beiden entwickelt sich eine sexuelle Beziehung. Es entwickelt sich ein Abhängigkeitsverhältnis, welches neben dem Geschlechtsverkehr davon geprägt ist, dass der junge Liebhaber seiner Hanna aus Büchern vorliest. Doch Hanna hat ein dunkles Geheimnis, welches sich erst Jahre nach dem Ende der Beziehung offenbart, als der zum Jusstudenten gereifte Michael seine ehemalige Liebeslehrerin als Angeklagte in einem Kriegsverbrecherprozess wiedererkennt.

Schlinks Hauptprotagonist Michael Berg erzählt im vorliegenden Roman rückblickend seine Lebensgeschichte gestaffelt in drei Teilen, welche drei wesentliche Wendepunkten markieren, nämlich den Beginn des sexuellen Erfahrens, dem Wiedererkennen der einstigen Liebhaberin beim Kriegsverbrecherprozess und die Zeit der Kontaktaufnahme und Reflexion in den folgenden Jahrzehnten.

Schlink erzählt schnörkellos und vereinfachend und berührt dabei große Themen wie sexuelles Erwachen aber auch Schuld und Sühne für Verbrechen des Dritten Reiches. Doch Schlink stellt nicht nur die oft rechtsethisch diskutierte Schuldfrage betreffend unmittelbarer Täter am Ende der Befehlskette. Er verknüpft persönliche Verantwortung mit subjektiven Motiven und Handicaps wie Analphabetismus und dem Scham darüber und schafft sohin ein Werk voller ethischer und philosophischer Fragen und Diskussionsansätzen. ( )
  schmechi | Oct 13, 2021 |
Vor vielleicht einem Jahr kam meine Tochter auf mich zu und fragte, ob wir eine Ausgabe von Schlinks “Der Vorleser” besäßen. Sie brauche es für den Deutsch-Leistungskurs in der Schule.

Ein Vierteljahrhundert vorher war Schlinks Roman gerade erschienen und machte Furore. Meine damalige Freundin schenkte es mir 1995 zum 20. Geburtstag und ich habe es verschlungen und geliebt.

Mir war ein wenig bange, als ich das Buch zurückerhielt und durchaus nicht zu Unrecht, denn für meine Tochter überwog die Kritik. (Und außerdem: Ein Buch, das heute in den Lehrplänen steht? Das ich als junger Mann geliebt hatte? Konnte das heute noch etwas sein?)
Ich hingegen hatte einen großartigen Roman über Schuld, Pflicht und Verbundenheit im Hinterkopf.

So pirschte ich mich kürzlich mit etwas flauem Gefühl in der Magengegend an eines meiner Lieblingsbücher nach so langer Zeit erneut heran. In Wahrheit allerdings hat die Geschichte mir aufgelauert, mich harmlos-scheinend geködert und dann wie einst überfallen, mitgerissen und völlig eingenommen...

Michael Berg, beim ersten Zusammentreffen gerade einmal 15, begegnet zufällig Hanna Schmitz und wird fortan nie mehr wirklich frei von ihr sein.
Schnell entwickelt sich zwischen beiden eine eigenartige Routine: Vor allem anderen liest Michael Hanna vor.

»Vorlesen, duschen, lieben und noch ein bißchen beieinanderliegen – das wurde das Ritual unserer Treffen.«

Doch diese Treffen nehmen ein jähes Ende als Hanna ohne ein Wort verschwindet. Für lange Jahre verschwindet sie aus Michaels Umfeld, aber nicht aus seinem Kopf. Er legt sich einen Panzer aus Arroganz zu, um nur nicht wieder derart verletzt zu werden, denn er hat »die Erinnerung an Hanna zwar verabschiedet, aber nicht bewältigt«.

Ausgerechnet im Gerichtssaal eines Prozesses gegen Wärterinnen des Konzentrationslagers Auschwitz trifft Michael als Jura-Student erneut auf Hanna, die dort angeklagt ist. Schnell wird klar: Hanna ist schuldig.

Für Michael wird aber auch klar, daß Hanna Analphabetin ist. Im Laufe des Verfahrens versteht er: Hanna wird jede Strafe auf sich nehmen, will aber um keinen Preis ihren Analphabetismus bloßgestellt wissen.

Michael kann die Bilder, die er von “seiner” Hanna mitnahm nicht mit denjenigen der KZ-Wärterin in Einklang bringen. Zeitweise verschwimmen beide gar miteinander.
Hanna wiederum weiß um ihre Schuld, sie bestreitet nicht die Fakten, aber während des Prozesses versteht sie dennoch nicht, wie es dazu kommen konnte.

Letztlich wird Hanna zu lebenslangem Gefängnis verurteilt und verschwindet somit wieder für Jahre aus Michael Bergs Leben - bis dieser beginnt, laut zu lesen und dies aufzunehmen. Die so entstehenden Kassetten-Aufnahmen schickt er Hanna ins Gefängnis - über einen Zeitraum von zehn Jahren. Noch immer ist Berg gewissermaßen gefangen in ihrem Bann und ist einerseits stolz auf sie, weil sie Lesen und Schreiben gelernt hat, gleichzeitig aber »traurig über sie, traurig über ihr verspätetes und verfehltes Leben«.

Als Hanna nach 18 Jahren im Gefängnis begnadigt wird, bereitet Berg “draußen” alles für sie vor und besucht sie im Gefängnis. Doch wiederum bekommt sein Bild von Hanna Risse; er hat sie als “immer frisch” riechend in Erinnerung und trifft auf eine Hanna, die, neben ihm sitzend, wie eine alte Frau riecht.

Hanna, die spätestens nach diesem Besuch weiß, daß das Vorlesen nunmehr wirklich zu Ende ist und sie sich letztlich auch von Berg nichts versprechen kann und darf, nimmt sich daraufhin das Leben. Ihre Beschäftigung mit dem KZ-System, dessen Bestandteil sie war, kann sie nicht rehabilitieren. Auschwitz kann man nicht vergeben und darf es nicht vergessen.

Auch Michael Berg wird nie wirklich von der gemeinsamen Geschichte frei sein. Er ist und bleibt gefangen in der Ambivalenz seiner subjektiven Geschichte mit Hanna.

Ich wiederum kann diesem Buch nicht gerecht werden. Was auch immer ich schreibe, bleibt hinter meinen eigenen Erwartungen zurück. Auch 26 Jahre nachdem ich es zum ersten Mal las, bleibt es mir ein unvergeßliches Meisterwerk.

Fünf von fünf Sternen und eine unbedingte Lese-Empfehlung.

»Die Schichten unseres Lebens ruhen so dicht aufeinander auf, daß uns im Späteren immer Früheres begegnet, nicht als Abgetanes und Erledigtes, sondern gegenwärtig und lebendig. Ich verstehe das. Trotzdem finde ich es manchmal schwer erträglich.«


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  philantrop | Oct 9, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 377 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
What starts out as a story of sexual awakening, something that Colette might have written, a ''Cherie and the Last of Cherie'' set in Germany after the war, is suddenly darkened by history and tragic secrets. In the end, one is both moved and disturbed, saddened and confused, and, above all, powerfully affected by a tale that seems to bear with it the weight of truth.
 
Schlink's daring fusion of 19th-century post-romantic, post-fairy-tale models with the awful history of the 20th century makes for a moving, suggestive and ultimately hopeful work, an original contribution to the impossible genre with the questionable name of Vergangenheitsbewaltigung, ''coming to terms with the past.''
 

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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Bernhard Schlinkautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Janeway, Carol BrownTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kirchner, Ernst LudwigArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lien, ToroddTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Meijerink, GerdaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Suominen, OiliTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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For 15-year-old Michael Berg, a chance meeting with an older woman leads to far more than he ever imagined. The woman in question is Hanna, and before long they embark on a passionate, clandestine love affair which leaves Michael both euphoric and confused. For Hanna is not all she seems. Years later, as a law student observing a trial in Germany, Michael is shocked to realize that the person in the dock is Hanna. The woman he had loved is a criminal. Much about her behaviour during the trial does not make sense. But then suddenly, and terribly, it does - Hanna is not only obliged to answer for a horrible crime, she is also desperately concealing an even deeper secret. 'A tender, horrifying novel that shows blazingly well how the Holocaust should be dealt with in fiction.

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