Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Ideas Have Consequences de Richard M. Weaver
Carregando...

Ideas Have Consequences (edição: 1984)

de Richard M. Weaver (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
735523,503 (4.32)2
Originally published in 1948, at the height of post-World War II optimism and confidence in collective security, Ideas Have Consequences uses "words hard as cannonballs" to present an unsparing diagnosis of the ills of the modern age. Widely read and debated at the time of its first publication,the book is now seen asone of the foundational texts of the modern conservative movement. In its pages, Richard M. Weaver argues that the decline of Western civilization resulted from the rising acceptance of relativism over absolute reality. In spite of increased knowledge, this retreat from the realist intellectual tradition has weakened the Western capacity to reason, with catastrophic consequences for social order and individual rights. But Weaver also offers a realistic remedy. These difficulties are the product not of necessity, but of intelligent choice. And, today, as decades ago, the remedy lies in the renewed acceptance of absolute reality and the recognition that ideas--like actions--have consequences. This expanded edition of the classic work contains a foreword by New Criterion editor Roger Kimball that offers insight into the rich intellectual and historical contexts of Weaver and his work and an afterword by Ted J. Smith III that relates the remarkable story of the book's writing and publication.… (mais)
Membro:MatthewMaule
Título:Ideas Have Consequences
Autores:Richard M. Weaver (Autor)
Informação:University Of Chicago Press (1984), Edition: 1, 198 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Ideas Have Consequences de Richard M. Weaver

Adicionado recentemente porselder, minickbd, wyclif, DavidMinnick, jose.pires, szarka, sarahfink628, gluegun
Bibliotecas HistóricasWalker Percy
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 2 menções

Exibindo 5 de 5
Tightly-written short book on the philosophical origins of the postwar traditionalist conservative movement in the United States. Weaver opens by stating in a matter-of-fact tone that "this is another book about the dissolution of the West." Weaver attacks moral relativism insistently, suggesting that the "denial of everything transcending experience means inevitably…the denial of truth. With the denial of objective truth there is no escape from the relativism of ‘man is the measure of all things.'" ( )
  wyclif | Sep 22, 2021 |
LT Ideas Have Consequences, Richard M. Weaver, Phoenix Books, 1948, 4/29-5/28/21
Recommended by [if anybody], Where is hard copy?

Theme: the idea that there is (not) objective reality has consequences; ontology versus autonomy; God or no God (man becomes god); see Carlyle quote 18-below, 182, 184; “the dissolution of the west” 1
Type: philosophy, social critique
Value: 1-
Age: post-college
Interest: 2+ difficult to understand wording and vocabulary
Objectionable:
Synopsis/Noteworthy:

Richard Weaver traces current social (human) destruction to nominalism (Occam, 3); that is, self defines (decides, declares) reality versus discovers reality; his claimed authority seems to be intuition (originally that it was philosophy, v); the world has forsaken first principles (2-3, 14)/God for materialism (vi); humanism/pluralism is the problem (2, 4); his a prioris (19)

(Carlyle, 1840, p.18) But the thing a man does practically believe (and this is often enough without asserting it even to himself, much less to others); the thing a man does practically lay to heart, and know for certain, concerning his vital relations to this mysterious Universe, and his duty and destiny there, that is in all cases the primary thing for him, and creatively determines all the rest. That is his religion; or, it may be, his mere scepticism and no-religion: the manner it is in which he feels himself to be spiritually related to the Unseen World or No-World; and I say, if you tell me what that is, you tell me to a very great extent what the man is, what the kind of things he will do is.

Cheryl 63, 175-respect
Ethan 10, 58fp, 80, 126, 139, 140, 163-1642, 176 [fp: and preceding, my made up! 5/3/21 ff: folios following
Lauren Reneau 81ff
Nate 31
Whit 70ff, 82, 162, 166, 184, 185

Faith vis a vis intelligence (seems to conflate them, confuses them?) 1, 3, 17
Worldview 3
Nature imitates transcendent 4
Sentiment 9, 17, 42, 54, 75, 76, 78, 85, 112, 118, 130, 147, 159, 1633, 180, 182
Education 7-8, 49, 79, 92-93, 114-115 (CBC), 136, 149, 155, 165, 169
Decadent by nature 10
Ends 12
Knowledge 12
Laziness 15
Ultimate beliefs (religion) 18, 127, 131, 146, 185
Immediacy 25, 27
Parents 30
Friends 31
Milton 39, 54
Equalitarianism 42, 44
(Non)progressive 51, 67, 69, 155
Academia 57
One-many 62
Mental illness 67-68
Self-absorption 70-71
RW secularizes God 76
Work 75-7, 116
Art 80
Augustinian 79-80
Music 83ff, 185
Perfect self or sensual enjoyment?! 91
Zeitgeist implementation-conspiracy 94, 104
Censorship 101
Goal of life-happiness 105, 106-7 (CBC), 116-8
Philosophy 106, 108,
Plato’s cave 111, 172
Saint-Exupery 109
Whigs 110, 130
Empiricism versus idealism 111
Extremism (exposed) 119
State 124
Socialism 125
Systemic racism 126
Socialism begins with recognition of problems 129 then 130
Educative power of experience 131
Social security 138
Reality is verbal 149-52, 156
Definitions 155-7
Wisdom-language 161, 173
Poetry 162, 165-6
Redefinitions! 164
Latin-Greek 166
Thinking 168
Nature 174
Respect others 175-6
Learn from-respect the past 176-7
Conservatism 172ff
City versus country 174
Equality of men/women 177-80
Individuality 180-1
Rebellion 182
Man as God 183
Paying the price—unable/unwilling 186-7
A closing class to discipline/submission to reality 186-7
All in this together 187
  keithhamblen | Jun 1, 2021 |
Of all the books I've read in my life, this one has radicalized my view of western culture and America in every way possible. Weaver's writing style is fervent and raging with the obvious intent of assisting the minds of his readers in the hopes true progress be made. This book has influenced my thinking profoundly, and I highly recommend that everyone, Americans in particular, spend the time to read and ponder the points Weaver makes. ( )
  Joseph_Paz_III | Jun 4, 2019 |
En este libro que ha devenido en clásico, Richard M. Weaver diagnostica las enfermedades de nuestra época y nos ofrece un remedio realista. Las catástrofes de nuestro tiempo son el resultado, no de la necesidad, sino de decisiones poco sabias. Una cura, sostiene, es posible; subyace en el correcto uso de la razón humana, en la renovada aceptación de la realidad, y en el reconocimiento de que las ideas –como las acciones- tienen consecuencias. ( )
  BibliotecaUNED | Jul 28, 2011 |
This is, quite simply, a dreadful book to read. It's philosophical in nature; Weaver asserts a cause for the evils in society (back in the 40's or so), attempts to prove his assertion, and then offers a solution. It's full of terms and word meanings that are not common to those not already immersed in philosophy, and he makes no attempt to accommodate the new reader. And his solution doesn't really match his stated problem, so the book is even of questionable value. I really can't recommend it, except to those who are diehard fans of philosophy. ( )
  james.garriss | Sep 18, 2007 |
Exibindo 5 de 5
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Originally published in 1948, at the height of post-World War II optimism and confidence in collective security, Ideas Have Consequences uses "words hard as cannonballs" to present an unsparing diagnosis of the ills of the modern age. Widely read and debated at the time of its first publication,the book is now seen asone of the foundational texts of the modern conservative movement. In its pages, Richard M. Weaver argues that the decline of Western civilization resulted from the rising acceptance of relativism over absolute reality. In spite of increased knowledge, this retreat from the realist intellectual tradition has weakened the Western capacity to reason, with catastrophic consequences for social order and individual rights. But Weaver also offers a realistic remedy. These difficulties are the product not of necessity, but of intelligent choice. And, today, as decades ago, the remedy lies in the renewed acceptance of absolute reality and the recognition that ideas--like actions--have consequences. This expanded edition of the classic work contains a foreword by New Criterion editor Roger Kimball that offers insight into the rich intellectual and historical contexts of Weaver and his work and an afterword by Ted J. Smith III that relates the remarkable story of the book's writing and publication.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.32)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 6
3.5
4 14
4.5 4
5 29

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 163,339,213 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível