Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Private Life of Chairman Mao: The…
Carregando...

The Private Life of Chairman Mao: The Memoirs of Mao's Personal Physician Dr. Li Zhisui (original: 1994; edição: 1994)

de Li Zhi-Sui (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
622937,941 (3.92)11
From 1954 until Mao Zedong's death twenty-two years later, Dr. Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler's personal physician, which put him in almost daily -- and increasingly intimate -- contact with Mao and his inner circle. For most of these years, Mao's health was excellent; thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters. Dr. Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries as well as in his memory. In The Private Life of Chairman Mao, he reconstructs his extraordinary experiences. Dr. Li clarifies numerous long-standing puzzles, such as the true nature of Mao's feelings toward the United States and the Soviet Union. He describes Mao's deliberate rudeness toward Khrushchev when the Soviet leader paid his secret visit to Beijing in 1958, and we learn here, for the first time, how Mao came to invite the American table tennis team to China, a decision that led to Nixon's historic visit a few months later. We also learn why Mao took the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which resulted in the worst famine in recorded history, and his equally strange reason for risking war with the United States by shelling the Taiwanese islands of Quemoy and Matsu. Dr. Li supplies surprising portraits of Zhou Enlai and many other top leaders. He describes Mao's relationship with his wife, and gives us insight into the sexual politics of Mao's court. Readers will find here a full account of Mao's sex life, and of such personal details as his peculiar sleeping arrangements and his dependency on barbiturates. We witness Mao's bizarre death and the even stranger events that followed it. Dr. Li tells of Mao's remarkable gift for intimacy, as well as of his indifference to the suffering and deaths of millions of his fellow Chinese, including old comrades.… (mais)
Membro:Russell098
Título:The Private Life of Chairman Mao: The Memoirs of Mao's Personal Physician Dr. Li Zhisui
Autores:Li Zhi-Sui (Autor)
Informação:Random House (1994), Edition: First Edition, 682 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

The private life of chairman Mao de Li Zhi-Sui (1994)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 11 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Rather than some "expert" who never met Chairman Mao, this book is written by his doctor. That doesn't mean that every word has to be taken as gospel, but Zhisui Li does make a believable picture of a dictator.

One of the wisest sayings is, "All power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely." and this book is the proof. I suspect that Mao started as a well meaning leader but, couldn't handle the adulation which, over time, turned to fear. He became a monster who viewed human life in numbers. ( )
  the.ken.petersen | Nov 3, 2022 |
Excellent. Well-written. Fascinating. ( )
  micahammon | Dec 19, 2020 |
To be sure, Mao Tse Tung was a bit of a prick. There, I've said it. The Chairman of the Chinese Communist Party he may have been but he was a queer duck, and his personal doctor Li Zhi-Sui was there to record Mao's many foibles.

We get an indepth look at Mao's health, his refusal to brush his tea, preferring to drink tea, his peccadilloes and the good doctor's waning faith in Mao. What sticks in my mind is Mao's constipation, so bad that the good doctor was forced to use his fingers to dig out hard stools. What made this so memorable though was the translator's phrase to describe using his fingers to dig out hard stools; "digital manipulation". Now, whenever I hear someone say "let's digitally manipulate that" I wince. ( )
  MiaCulpa | Jun 16, 2020 |
Dr. Li Zhisui recounts his personal interactions with Chairman Mao throughout his years as Mao's personal doctor. This account is not only captivating, but gives insight into the personality and events surrounding Mao. ( )
  MarchingBandMan | Apr 3, 2017 |
I read this book side by side with the other Mao Biography of Jung Chang. Both make exceptional reading. ( )
  fak119 | Feb 5, 2015 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Li Zhi-Suiautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Thurston, Anne F.Editorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Chao, Tai HungTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hung-chao, TaiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Leroi-Batistelli, MartineTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Marcel, HenriTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nathan, Andrew J.Prefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Straschitz, FrankTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tai, Hung-chaoTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In remembrance of my beloved wife, Lillian Wu
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
"Chairman, you called for me?"
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (3)

From 1954 until Mao Zedong's death twenty-two years later, Dr. Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler's personal physician, which put him in almost daily -- and increasingly intimate -- contact with Mao and his inner circle. For most of these years, Mao's health was excellent; thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters. Dr. Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries as well as in his memory. In The Private Life of Chairman Mao, he reconstructs his extraordinary experiences. Dr. Li clarifies numerous long-standing puzzles, such as the true nature of Mao's feelings toward the United States and the Soviet Union. He describes Mao's deliberate rudeness toward Khrushchev when the Soviet leader paid his secret visit to Beijing in 1958, and we learn here, for the first time, how Mao came to invite the American table tennis team to China, a decision that led to Nixon's historic visit a few months later. We also learn why Mao took the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which resulted in the worst famine in recorded history, and his equally strange reason for risking war with the United States by shelling the Taiwanese islands of Quemoy and Matsu. Dr. Li supplies surprising portraits of Zhou Enlai and many other top leaders. He describes Mao's relationship with his wife, and gives us insight into the sexual politics of Mao's court. Readers will find here a full account of Mao's sex life, and of such personal details as his peculiar sleeping arrangements and his dependency on barbiturates. We witness Mao's bizarre death and the even stranger events that followed it. Dr. Li tells of Mao's remarkable gift for intimacy, as well as of his indifference to the suffering and deaths of millions of his fellow Chinese, including old comrades.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.92)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 17
3.5 7
4 45
4.5 3
5 23

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 205,999,370 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível