Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Little Virtues de Natalia Ginzburg
Carregando...

The Little Virtues (edição: 1989)

de Natalia Ginzburg

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3541254,397 (3.78)8
"As far as the education of children is concerned," states Natalia Ginzburg in this collection of her finest and best-known short essays, "I think they should be taught not the little virtues but the great ones. Not thrift but generosity and an indifference to money; not caution but courage and a contempt for danger; not shrewdness but frankness and a love of truth; not tact but a love of one's neighbor and self-denial; not a desire for success but a desire to be and to know." Whether she writes of the loss of a friend, Cesare Pavese; or what is inexpugnable of World War II; or the Abruzzi, where she and her first husband lived in forced residence under Fascist ru≤ or the importance of silence in our society; or her vocation as a writer; or even a pair of worn-out shoes, Ginzburg brings to her reflections the wisdom of a survivor and the spare, wry, and poetically resonant style her readers have come to recognize.  "A glowing light of modern Italian literature . . . Ginzburg's magic is the utter simplicity of her prose, suddenly illuminated by one word that makes a lightning streak of a plain phrase. . . . As direct and clean as if it were carved in stone, it yet speaks thoughts of the heart." --The New York Times Book Review… (mais)
Membro:jimvalena
Título:The Little Virtues
Autores:Natalia Ginzburg
Informação:Arcade Publishing (1989), Paperback, 110 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Little Virtues de Natalia Ginzburg (Author)

Adicionado recentemente porHelioKonishi, biblioteca privada, rick_saenz, litxt, ArrupeLibrary, cancito, giovannaz63, MRMP

Nenhum(a).

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 8 menções

Inglês (6)  Italiano (3)  Espanhol (2)  Todos os idiomas (11)
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I read this to see if I should ask for the library to buy all her New Directions reissues and YES she is a very good writer BUT even she admits her novels are better than her essays, SO i'm reserving judgment! ( )
  uncleflannery | May 16, 2020 |
Imagine a mid-20th-century Italian intellectual who admits without embarrassment to wearing worn-out shoes, claims that she isn't interested in cooking and always buys the wrong things from the market, can't drive (in Torino!), can't sing (and starts an essay on the topic of "Silence" by discussing an opera), never uses two words where one will do, and has never been known to drop names of any description.

No, I can't, either. But that is the image that Natalia Ginzburg likes to project. In the land of bella figura her provocative self-mockery and her brusque, no-nonsense style seem to have caused quite a few cases of spontaneous combustion amongst literary critics, but they clearly won her a lot of respect as well.

The short essays in Le piccole virtù, written between 1945 and 1962, form something between a memoir and a manifesto for literature in a post-war world, but without the egotism either of those forms usually implies.

"Inverno in Abruzzo" describes the experience of being banished by the fascists to a remote village near Aquila — she writes about the privations of daily life for the family, and how much she and her husband miss the city (the children are too young to imagine what a city might be like). And then in the last paragraph she turns everything upside-down by telling us that her husband was murdered in a Roman jail, a few months after they left Abruzzo. She couldn't imagine it at the time, but now she sees that the months they spent together in the back of beyond were the best time of her life. "Le scarpe rotte", written shortly after the war when she was working in Rome, the kids parked with her parents in Torino, is about the unexpected pleasures of poverty, and a classic attack on one of the most sacred things in Italian culture.

Then there's a lovely — but unsentimental — portrait of her friend, the poet Cesare Pavese, who killed himself in August 1950, and two pieces about London in 1960. The second of these, "La Maison Volpé", is a glorious denunciation of the English food-culture of the time, possibly the most unapologetically Italian piece in the whole book, but spot-on in its dry mockery. No-one who remembers the dusty curtains and rotating plastic oranges of those days could possibly take offence. "Lui e io" is a funny, self-deprecatory description of her relationship with her second husband, Gabriele Baldini, which could be about any middle-aged couple ("he's always too hot, I'm always too cold...").

In the second part, she discusses how the experience of the war has changed things for her generation and the things they can write about, she talks about developing as a writer ("Il mio mestiere") and as a human being ("I rapporti humani"), and in the piece that gives the collection its title, about the responsibilities of parenting, which for her seems to be more about non-intervention than anything else, in a very sixties spirit.

All the pieces in this collection are clever, subtle, amazing bits of writing, but the ones that really stood out for me were "Il mio mestiere" and "I rapporti humani", two pieces that seem to sum up everything that needs to be said about the puzzling business of growing up. I really wish I'd read them as a teenager! ( )
  thorold | May 1, 2020 |
Variety of essays very well written. Content was interesting, but I did not agree with much of it. ( )
  suesbooks | Nov 28, 2019 |
A collection of essays by Italian author Natalia Ginzburg focused primarily on her life in Italy during and after World War II, her vocation as a writer, and her reflections on human behavior and relationship. The title of the book comes from her essay by the same name, which discusses the importance of teaching children "big virtues" such as courage, generosity, and love.

Ginzburg's prose feels personal yet distant, and there is a lyrical cadence to many of her pieces that belies her poetic soul. Her descriptions of the people and places in wartime and post-war Europe manage to communicate the despair and weariness of a survivor, yet are still tinged with hope and affection. These are essays that will both move you and remain with you. ( )
  smichaelwilson | Mar 7, 2019 |
The eleven essays collected here cover a long period in Natalia Ginzburg’s writing life. Her vocation, as she often refers to it, has brought her solace through hard times and other pleasures as well. It is her guide to much of life’s vicissitudes, even to the point of steering her understanding of the virtues, little and great.

I preferred the essays in part one of the collection. These are at times nostalgic, a touch mournful, highly particularized, and personal. The very first essay, “Winter in the Abruzzi,” may be the best, though her two portraits of England are charming, if only because they describe a land that no longer exists: “It is a country which has always shown itself ready to welcome foreigners, from very diverse communities, without I think oppressing them.” If only.

The essays of the second part of the book are more abstract. Not because they deal with essentially abstract notions, but because, I think, Ginzburg’s writing style has changed. Her claims become sweeping, about childhood, education, her own vocation and vocations in general, and the nature of virtue. Here the writing is less compelling, less communicative, less appealing. At least for me. ( )
  RandyMetcalfe | Jun 30, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (2 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Ginzburg, NataliaAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cusk, RachelIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Davis, DickTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Giovanna MezzogiornoLettoreautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Salem, AdrianaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Francês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Deus nobis haec otia fecit
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
There are only two seasons in the Abruzzi: summer and winter.
In Abruzzo non c'è che due stagioni: l'estate e l'inverno.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Per quanto riguarda l’educazione dei figli, penso che si  debbano insegnar loro non le piccole virtù, ma le grandi. Non il risparmio, ma la generosità e l’indifferenza al denaro; non la prudenza, ma il coraggio e lo sprezzo del pericolo; non l’astuzia, ma la schiettezza e l’amore alla verità; non la diplomazia, ma l’amore al prossimo e l’abnegazione, non il desiderio del successo, ma il desiderio di essere e di sapere.
Di solito invece facciamo il contrario: ci affrettiamo a insegnare il rispetto per le pic­cole virtù, fondando su di esse tutto il nostro sistema educativo. Scegliamo, in questo modo, la via più comoda: perché le piccole virtù non racchiudono alcun pericolo mate­riale, e anzi tengono al riparo dai colpi della fortuna. Trascuriamo d’insegnare le gran­di virtù, e tuttavia le amiamo, e vorremmo che i nostri figli le avessero: ma nutriamo fiducia che scaturiscano spontaneamente nel loro animo, un giorno avvenire, ritenen­dole di natura istintiva, mentre le altre, le piccole, ci sembrano il frutto d’una riflessio­ne e di un calcolo e perciò noi pensiamo che debbano assolutamente essere insegnate.
In realtà la differenza è solo apparente. Anche le piccole virtù provengono dal profon­do del nostro istinto, da un istinto di difesa: ma in esse la ragione parla, sentenzia, dis­serta, brillante avvocato dell’incolumità personale. Le grandi virtù sgorgano da un istinto in cui la ragione non parla, un istinto a cui mi sarebbe difficile dare un nome. E il meglio di noi è in quel muto istinto: e non nel nostro istinto di difesa, che argomen­ta, sentenzia, disserta con la voce della ragione.
L’educazione non è che un certo rapporto che stabiliamo fra noi e i nostri figli, un certo clima in cui fioriscono i sentimenti, gli istinti, i pensieri. Ora io credo che un clima tutto ispirato al rispetto per le piccole virtù, maturi insensibilmen­te al cinismo, o alla paura di vive­re. Le piccole virtù, in se stesse, non hanno nulla da fare col cinismo, o con la paura di vivere: ma tutte insieme, e senza le grandi, genera­no un’atmosfera che porta a quel­le conseguenze.
Non che le picco­le virtù, in se stesse, siano sprege­voli: ma il loro valore è di ordine complementare e non sostanzia­le; esse non possono stare da sole senza le altre, e sono, da sole senza le altre, per la natura umana un povero cibo. Il modo di esercitare le piccole virtù, in misura tempera­ta e quando sia del tutto indispensabile, l’uomo può trovarlo intorno a sé e berlo nell’a­ria: perché le piccole virtù sono di un ordine assai comune e diffuso tra gli uomini.
Ma le grandi virtù, quelle non si respirano nell’aria: e debbono essere la prima sostanza del nostro rapporto coi nostri figli, il primo fondamento dell’educazione. Inoltre, il grande può anche contenere il piccolo: ma il piccolo, per legge di natura, non può in alcun modo contenere il grande.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Francês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"As far as the education of children is concerned," states Natalia Ginzburg in this collection of her finest and best-known short essays, "I think they should be taught not the little virtues but the great ones. Not thrift but generosity and an indifference to money; not caution but courage and a contempt for danger; not shrewdness but frankness and a love of truth; not tact but a love of one's neighbor and self-denial; not a desire for success but a desire to be and to know." Whether she writes of the loss of a friend, Cesare Pavese; or what is inexpugnable of World War II; or the Abruzzi, where she and her first husband lived in forced residence under Fascist ru≤ or the importance of silence in our society; or her vocation as a writer; or even a pair of worn-out shoes, Ginzburg brings to her reflections the wisdom of a survivor and the spare, wry, and poetically resonant style her readers have come to recognize.  "A glowing light of modern Italian literature . . . Ginzburg's magic is the utter simplicity of her prose, suddenly illuminated by one word that makes a lightning streak of a plain phrase. . . . As direct and clean as if it were carved in stone, it yet speaks thoughts of the heart." --The New York Times Book Review

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.78)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 2
4 19
4.5 3
5 8

Arcade Publishing

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Arcade Publishing.

Edições: 1611457971, 1628728256

Hachette Book Group

Uma edição deste livro foi publicada pela Hachette Book Group.

» Página Web de informação sobre a editora

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 155,658,614 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível