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Bridge to Terabithia de Katherine Paterson
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Bridge to Terabithia (edição: 2008)

de Katherine Paterson (Autor), Donna Diamond (Ilustrador)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
17,279564225 (4.02)274
The life of a ten-year-old boy in rural Virginia expands when he becomes friends with a newcomer who subsequently meets an untimely death trying to reach their hideaway, Terabithia, during a storm.
Membro:ceciliabarnhill
Título:Bridge to Terabithia
Autores:Katherine Paterson (Autor)
Outros autores:Donna Diamond (Ilustrador)
Informação:HarperTeen (2004), 208 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Bridge to Terabithia de Katherine Paterson

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    A Wrinkle in Time de Madeleine L'Engle (kkunker)
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    The Brothers Lionheart de Astrid Lindgren (Medicinos)
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    The Hideout de Sigrid Heuck (bookel)
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    Finn's Going de Tom Kelly (sirfurboy)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 560 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book is something of a mixed bag for me. I remember reading and loving it as a child, but then rereading it in advance if passing it along to my own daughter, I have serious misgivings. Many come in the form of criticisms leveled in other reviews - dysfunctional family dynamics, cruelty among schoolchildren and toward teachers, Jesse connecting Leslie’s death with his own choices, etc. I had completely forgotten about a lot of the negative language and viewpoints of the book, and even as a child seeing Jesse blame himself for Leslie’s death, I knew it was his perspective, but not actually true. I do remember that I loved seeing Jesse grow more confident in who he was and his imagination, and at the end learn to accept grief and move on with a bigger heart.

There’s something beautiful and powerful about reading/watching a person’s path through grief, particularly because if it’s real, then it’s not pretty and not easy to look at. The audiobook version I listened to had a short interview with the author and her son, where I learned that this book came directly from an experience where Patterson’s son lost a friend suddenly and tragically when he was 7 or 8. He said he didn’t remember much from that time, but I expect the event was seared into his mother’s memory. As such, she had a first hand look at how a child deals with grief. Jesse experiences anger, depression, guilt, and deals with them in a way that seems pretty natural for a boy his age. He doesn’t get much direction from adults (it seemed that either, like Leslie’s parents, they were too caught up in their own grief, or, like Jesse’s parents, they didn’t really know how to deal with it), but he manages to find his way thru to acceptance and peace.

The book describes one boy’s experience, it doesn’t recommend how one should experience loss (or deal with life in general, for that matter, it just describes a rather harsh culture in which to grow up). That being said, there are other books about dealing with loss and grief that provide better supporting characters and atmospheres, so I don’t feel the need to share this one in particular with my kids, at least not just yet. ( )
  Annrosenzweig | Oct 15, 2021 |
Jess Aarons lives a simple life for a teenager, helping his parents with the chores, doing his schoolwork, and trying his best to become the fastest runner in school. When a new girl, Leslie Burke, moves in as his new neighbor, all of that changes. For one, Leslie turns out to be a rather fast runner herself. And together they invent Terabithia, an enchanted land that only they can get to or see in the woods near their homes. But fantasies can only last for so long, and a tragic accident shatters their world in a way that leaves Jess wondering if he can ever truly pick up the pieces.

I saw this movie a few years back, and it was one that I certainly enjoyed right away. The book provided an interesting comparison. The movie follows the book pretty well, though I think the book provides a little bit better sense of how Jess feels about his life and the people around him. It's subtle, which I think is a testament to the way the author has developed the world and the characters, but it's there. And, overall, I think it adds both to understanding Jess's motivation and his reactions as we move through the book. ( )
  crtsjffrsn | Aug 27, 2021 |
A touching if somewhat dated young adult novel about friendship, loyalty, understanding one's strengths and weaknesses, and the complicated feelings surrounding death. I wish I had read this when I was younger. ( )
  Charon07 | Jul 16, 2021 |
Heartbreaking but beautiful ( )
  pamirick | Jun 10, 2021 |
I hadn't picked up Bridge to Terabithia since I was in fifth or sixth grade when I had to read it for a class assignment. Since that was nearly 30 years ago, I only had vague, fuzzy memories of the story itself and of the book being one that I had liked. I am so glad that I decided to re-read it through adult eyes, because I think I probably appreciated it even more now than I did as a kid. That may be due to me experiencing more loss in the last three decades than I had at the tender age of ten or eleven, which makes the plot resonate with me on a deeper level. As I've said in other reviews, it is rare for a book to make me really cry, but Bridge to Terabithia made my short list of ones that have. The story is a simple one of friendship, tragedy, and coping with loss, but it is layered with depth and complexity that is astonishing for its short length. Katherine Paterson writes with a stark honesty that is utterly beautiful. Her characters are very real and ordinary, yet they touched me in a profound and emotional way. None of them are perfect, but to me that made them all the more genuine in their actions and interactions. Jess' family can sometimes seem harsh, but they were there for him when it counted the most. One of my favorite scenes in the book is near the end, when Jess and his father sit on the bank of the creek and talk. When it comes right down to it, they really don't say all that much, but it was just enough to get the point across and re-establish that father/son connection that Jess had been missing.

Jess and Leslie were two kids that I could have easily been friends with when I was their age. Jess can sometimes be rather mean with his sisters and had some rude thoughts about the adults in his life, but I think even the nicest kids do from time to time. What I really liked about him is that underneath it all, it's obvious that he still cares for his sisters, especially May Belle, even though they get on his nerves, and when it comes to the adults, he still outwardly treats them with respect and is a well-behaved child both in school and at home. I also like that Jess has this hidden creative part of himself that no one but Leslie really understands which is what makes them such great friends. Leslie is kind of the oddball who isn't like the other girls in their class, but she has an empathy and understanding of the world around her that is rare in most kids of that age.

In addition to connecting with the characters as a whole, another thing that resonated with me is the teasing they endure which was much like things I experienced as well. The only thing that bothered me slightly was when the abuse of a secondary character was revealed and it seemed that the issue would probably be swept under the rug. However, given the culture and time period in which the story took place, it made sense. Jess and Leslie's imaginary kingdom of Terabithia reminded me of games that I played with cousins or friends. The rural setting also brought to mind the area in which I grew up. It was almost like experiencing my childhood all over again, yet aside from a few pop-culture references, it is really a story out of time and space that could easily take place anywhere and anytime.

I must say that I'm rather surprised that more than 30 years after its original publication, Bridge to Terabithia is still #28 on the American Library Association's Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books list of the last decade (2000-2009). I believe that one of the biggest complaints are the use of some profanities which are quite mild by today's standards. A few are uttered or thought by the kids, but most were said by the adults in their lives. I admit that as someone who had a pretty strict and sheltered upbringing, I was slightly scandalized when I first read the book as a child, but I can say without a doubt that I was completely unscathed by the experience. Now reading it as an adult, I actually felt that the “bad words” were never meant to be shocking or provocative. Instead, they seemed to be carefully placed to give meaning to the story and in my opinion, also added to the genuineness and honesty of the prose. Admittedly, the subject matter of the book could be upsetting to some kids, but if educators or parents are guiding them through the reading experience they should be fine. I would have absolutely no qualms at all about allowing my fifth grader to read it. In my opinion, there is a strong and beautiful message contained within its pages and the positives to be gained from reading it far outweigh any detractors. I would highly recommend the book to both kids and adults alike. To the best of my recollection, Bridge to Terabithia is the only book by Katherine Paterson that I have ever read, but I am greatly looking forward to exploring her other books. I guess it just goes to show that one is never too old to appreciate a good children's book.;-) ( )
  mom2lnb | May 28, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 560 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Valerie O. Patterson (Children's Literature)
Jesse Oliver Aarons, Jr. practices all summer so that he can be the fastest runner in his rural Virginia fifth-grade class. Despite his practice, however, he loses the race on the first day of school to Leslie Burke, the new girl in school whose hippy parents have moved from Washington, DC. Despite Jesse’s lost running dream, he becomes fast friends with Leslie. Together they build the imaginary kingdom of Terabitia in the woods. To Jesse, Leslie is “more than his friend. She was his other more exciting self--his way to Terabithia and all the worlds beyond.” When Jesse’s favorite teacher takes him to see the art museums in Washington one rainy day, he returns home to find his world permanently changed by tragedy--Leslie’s death. Despite his heartache, Jesse moves forward, a stronger and more whole individual for his friendship with Leslie. Written by the author for her then young son whose best friend was killed by lightning, this Newbery Medal winner moves the heart and spirit with its beautiful writing, wrenching honesty, and hopeful ending. 2005 (orig. 1977), HarperCollins, $5.99. Ages 9 to 12.
adicionado por kthomp25 | editarChildren's Literature, Valerie O. Patterson
 

» Adicionar outros autores (15 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Paterson, Katherineautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Diamond, DonnaIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The life of a ten-year-old boy in rural Virginia expands when he becomes friends with a newcomer who subsequently meets an untimely death trying to reach their hideaway, Terabithia, during a storm.

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