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Three Uses of the Knife de David Mamet
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Three Uses of the Knife

de David Mamet

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316564,285 (3.81)1
The purpose of theater, like magic, like religion . . . is to inspire cleansing awe. What makes good drama? And why does drama matter in an age that is awash in information and entertainment? David Mamet, one of our greatest living playwrights, tackles these questions with bracing directness and aphoristic authority. He believes that the tendency to dramatize is essential to human nature, that we create drama out of everything from today's weather to next year's elections. But the highest expression of this drive remains the theater.          With a cultural range that encompasses Shakespeare, Bretcht, and Ibsen, Death of a Salesman and Bad Day at Black Rock, Mamet shows us how to distinguish true drama from its false variants. He considers the impossibly difficult progression between one act and the next and the mysterious function of the soliloquy. The result, in Three Uses of the Knife, is an electrifying treatise on the playwright's art that is also a strikingly original work of moral and aesthetic philosophy. … (mais)
Membro:csandersring
Título:Three Uses of the Knife
Autores:David Mamet
Informação:Publisher Unknown
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Three Uses of the Knife: On the Nature and Purpose of Drama de David Mamet

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Exibindo 5 de 5
This short little book contains a multitude of information and ideas. In the way only Mamet can, he swerves among drama, politics, religion, and all sorts of other subjects. And, also as only Mamet can, he makes it interesting, controversial and definitely worth a re-read. ( )
  evenlake | Mar 23, 2021 |
Mamet is always a compelling writer, and it's hard not to appreciate his stubborn, overconfident torrent of opinions—it's direct and easy to read. But then again, it's smart half the time, and downright silly the other half. ( )
  mrgan | Oct 30, 2017 |
On the positive, Mamet ventures bold and crisp statements on what makes good drama (or, perhaps more accurately, good Mamet-style drama). On the negative, he's wrong as often as he's right. His writing is brilliant; his writing about writing is less so. ( )
  jorgearanda | Mar 15, 2009 |
From Library Journal
One of America's leading living playwrights has crafted three short essays beginning with the premise that it is "our nature to dramatize." The belief in the centrality of drama to our daily lives and the centrality of our daily lives to good drama is the recurrent theme of his ruminations here. While he disdains the current vogue for "problem plays," he avoids attacking any of his contemporaries or their works. And without offering a how-to guide for aspiring playwrights, he provides some interesting thoughts on the inevitable difficulty in creating a convincing second act. Known and respected for his ability to create hyperrealistic dialog, Mamet ultimately reveals the theoretical justification for the sort of drama he writes so well. The text reads a bit like a lecture and never quite convinces the reader that this is a fundamental redefinition of drama. Still, it will be compelling to students of theater and serves as a good companion to Mamet's advice to actors, True and False. Douglas McClemont, New York
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.
  mmckay | May 9, 2006 |
A perfect antidote to any thick, ponderous textbook on the history of theater. ( )
  seventime | Oct 27, 2005 |
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The purpose of theater, like magic, like religion . . . is to inspire cleansing awe. What makes good drama? And why does drama matter in an age that is awash in information and entertainment? David Mamet, one of our greatest living playwrights, tackles these questions with bracing directness and aphoristic authority. He believes that the tendency to dramatize is essential to human nature, that we create drama out of everything from today's weather to next year's elections. But the highest expression of this drive remains the theater.          With a cultural range that encompasses Shakespeare, Bretcht, and Ibsen, Death of a Salesman and Bad Day at Black Rock, Mamet shows us how to distinguish true drama from its false variants. He considers the impossibly difficult progression between one act and the next and the mysterious function of the soliloquy. The result, in Three Uses of the Knife, is an electrifying treatise on the playwright's art that is also a strikingly original work of moral and aesthetic philosophy. 

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808.2 — Literature By Topic Rhetoric and anthologies Rhetoric of drama

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