Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

A Few Bloody Noses: The Realities and Mythologies of the American…

de Robert Harvey

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1712122,811 (3.79)2
"We meant well to the Americans -- just to punish them with a few bloody noses, and then to make laws for the happiness of both countries," said George III. The ensuing uprising led to the creation of the United States -- this extraordinary country, this amalgam of people from every corner of the earth. Robert Harvey, whose most recent book Liberators cast a new light on the struggle against colonialism in South America, challenges many conventional views of the American Revolution -- why it happened, who was winning and when, who was for it and who was not, the characters of the principal protagonists, and the role of Native Americans and slaves. Harvey creatively studies this seminal event in the making of the United States, taking a penetrating look at a war that was both vicious and confused, bloody and protracted, and marred on both sides by incompetence and bad faith. He underscores the effect of the Revolution on the colonists in America, and those at home in Britain -- the country that the colonists had left behind, and to which (not so widely known) many returned. The result is an extraordinarily fascinating and thoroughly readable work.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 2 menções

Exibindo 2 de 2
The American Revolution, from the British point of view. (The title comes from a quote attributed to George III, "We meant well to the Americans—just to punish them with a few bloody noses, and then to make laws for the happiness of both countries.") The author is a journalist and former Member of Parliament, and the book sometimes shows it, coming off as expanded opinion piece rather than a scholarly study. Nevertheless, this is a convincing debunking of a lot of the myths and legends of the American Revolution - a couple of times I was ready to petition for an audience with the Queen, get down on my knees, and beg for forgiveness. We deserve it after coming out with The Patriot.


However, most of this is stuff we already know. It's no longer a secret that preRevolutionary America was less heavily taxed than it is today, that the Americans didn't treat blacks and natives very well, that Washington was no great shakes as a general, and that Franklin liked to flirt with the ladies. Harvey has nothing complimentary to say about any of the Founders; although he professes admiration for Washington, it's mostly damning with faint praise. Franklin is an "old rogue", Ethan Allen is a "violent hillbilly" (to be fair, I'm not sure Harvey understands just how prejudicial "hillbilly" is), and Samuel Adams is "the American Lenin" (it's not clear whether Harvey thinks comparing someone to Lenin is a compliment or not). I'm especially annoyed by the treatment of Franklin, who was the foremost scientist of the day and the closest thing to a Rennaisance Man since DiVinci; however, a lot of Americans haven't picked up on this either, thinking of him as the guy on the $100 bill if they think anything at all. I'm also annoyed the way the comparison to Vietnam is hammered on over and over again - the US did not have the same command problems in Vietnam that the British did here, and there was no adjacent country that kept funneling supplies to the American rebels, like North Vietnam did for the Viet Cong.


I found the book most valuable for its treatment of personalities on the British side; I had no idea General Burgoyne of Saratoga was a highly successful playwright. I'll have to see if any of his work is still in print. ( )
  setnahkt | Dec 6, 2017 |
The umpteenth book I've read about the American Revolution, but possibly the first I've ever read written by a British author, and a former Member of Parliament to boot. Harvey provides a fair appraisal of the revolution, and is obvious in his biases admiring figures on both sides, and bringing both British and American leaders who fail to meet up to his standards to task (the obvious bias of course is a sign of a good historian, as opposed to those who pretend to be unbiased). Much of the book is a military analysis of the war itself, but Harvey often delves into politics, pointing out how frequently the Americans actions ran counter to the ideology of the revolution. The last chapter in particular is interesting in which Harvey rather convincingly states that the Constitutional Convention was in fact a conservative counter-revolution to populist government. One of the better histories of the American Revolution I have read.

"Time was to be a decisive factor in the war: the longer it dragged on, the more Americans were to believe the British could not win, and the more weary British educated opinion was to become with the conflict." p. 166 ( )
1 vote Othemts | Jun 25, 2008 |
Exibindo 2 de 2
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (3)

"We meant well to the Americans -- just to punish them with a few bloody noses, and then to make laws for the happiness of both countries," said George III. The ensuing uprising led to the creation of the United States -- this extraordinary country, this amalgam of people from every corner of the earth. Robert Harvey, whose most recent book Liberators cast a new light on the struggle against colonialism in South America, challenges many conventional views of the American Revolution -- why it happened, who was winning and when, who was for it and who was not, the characters of the principal protagonists, and the role of Native Americans and slaves. Harvey creatively studies this seminal event in the making of the United States, taking a penetrating look at a war that was both vicious and confused, bloody and protracted, and marred on both sides by incompetence and bad faith. He underscores the effect of the Revolution on the colonists in America, and those at home in Britain -- the country that the colonists had left behind, and to which (not so widely known) many returned. The result is an extraordinarily fascinating and thoroughly readable work.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.79)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 4
3.5 3
4 8
4.5
5 2

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 158,911,349 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível