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Moonbound: A Novel (Anth) de Robin Sloan
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Moonbound: A Novel (Anth) (edição: 2024)

de Robin Sloan (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
745366,587 (4.13)1
"It is eleven thousand years from now. A lot has happened, and yet a lot is still very familiar. Ariel is a boy in a small town under a wizard's rule. Like many adventurers before him, Ariel is called to explore a world full of unimaginable glories and challenges: unknown enemies, a mission to save the world, a girl. Here, as they say, be dragons. But none of this happens before Ariel comes across an artifact from an earlier civilization, a sentient, record-keeping artificial intelligence that carries with it the perspective of the whole of human history--and becomes both Ariel's greatest ally and the narrator of our story. Moonbound is an adventure into the richest depths of Story itself. It is a deeply satisfying epic of ancient scale, blasted through the imaginative prism one of our most forward-thinking writers. And this is only the beginning"--… (mais)
Membro:hcnewton
Título:Moonbound: A Novel (Anth)
Autores:Robin Sloan (Autor)
Informação:MCD (2024), 432 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Moonbound de Robin Sloan

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Exibindo 5 de 5
It's the year 13777. Everything is different, but nothing has changed. Fascinating and fun, with apparently more to come. ( )
  JBD1 | Jul 13, 2024 |
Its not very often I read a book set in the far future where everything turns out okay, with a sense of place that feels authentic, but also weird. The narrator, a sentient fungi/computer that is lives in a person and records (and sometimes gives advice) what their host does - basically a chronicler. Having this entity as a narrator is brilliant, they narrate what is happening, but has very little influence on what their host actually does. As for this world, talking animals, mad magicians, inter-dimensional wyrms (where scholars have conversations and coffee runs life), to an ecological war between beavers on the land, and a giant computer in the ocean....

As for the story itself, while based on King Author, there are scraps of other stories, from Wizard of Oz, to Dune, all mashed together to create something that is distinctively itself. Its a gentle book, no great battles, but its also not sappy, there is sadness, death, scariness - this world is not safe, but it is fun.

Highly Recommended ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Jul 5, 2024 |
An intelligence, crafted by the Anth (two hundred years into our future; eleven thousand years into the book's past) of fungus and technology, narrates the story from within Ariel de la Sauvage, a boy who has grown up in a castle and goes on a quest. Disorienting at first (especially the first few pages), the story unfolds, expands, resolves, moves forward: Ariel journeys away from the Castle Sauvage, through a bog. He meets talking beavers - all animals in Ariel's world talk, but there are no birds - who have debates and solve problems with architecture. He lives in Rath Varia, a recycling wonderland, and goes scavenging, and learns from wizards, and meets Durga, the last of the Anth. Ariel (and the chronicler), Durga, and a beaver called Agassiz travel to the College of Wyrd, where scholars plumb the depths, diving deep (literally) to ask questions of the Wyrm, whose true identity is a surprise. All along, Ariel seeks to free Sauvage from the wizard Malory, but Malory's own goal is different: to escape Earth, to meet the dragons on the moon, and to explore space.

Firmly science fiction but with deep affection for fantasy and myth (particularly King Arthur), Moonbound is deeply imagined, creatively fresh, and slyly humorous - and the end hints at a sequel.

Quotes

It was a mash-up, a pile-up, not so much anachronistic as everything all at once. (20)

...couldn't believe I had missed an absence so profound...the loss felt unbearable. How could there be any history at all; how could humans, in any form, go on; without any birds in the sky? (156)

"The wizards give us gifts and too often they are traps." (Scrounger, 199)

"Recycling...is useful, but recycling is not all. Someone, sometime, has to make something new." (Durga, 237)

"The present is a function of the future, not the past." (Durga, 237)

Decarbonization was the maturation of the Middle Anth: the beginning of real history. (253)

"New things are possible. Everything is possible." (Durga, 269)

How luxurious, to have a small god narrate your audiobook. (321) (references to C.S. Lewis, Philip Pullman, Ursula K. Le Guin)

"I will help you imagine it. A cathedral of paranoia; a haunted house; a maze of twisty passages, all alike; a vast observatory..." (Wyrm/Ingrid/dragon, 352)

The great question of the Anth: What happens next? (404)

The ballistic shock of education, which, at its best, provides the realization: life can be different. (405)

Real history could only begin now, with choices made not from fear or necessity, but from curiosity and solidarity. These were the engines of the Anth... (412)

"Some of us search outward....Some inward....You do both at once. It makes you a good chronicler, but it also makes you...singular." (414) ( )
  JennyArch | Jul 2, 2024 |
This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.
---
LET'S GET THIS OUT OF THE WAY RIGHT NOW
This is not like the Robin Sloan books you may have read. This is not Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore (even if everything I've seen from the publisher says it's part of the Penumbraverse) and this isn't Sourdough. If you're looking for something like that, I can't help you by talking about this book.

And yet...some of the same themes, the same kind of ideas, the same oddball ways of thinking, the same characters that will fascinate and (sometimes) frustrate you, the same quality of writing are present. So it is like the Robin Sloan books you may have read. But not really.

WHAT'S MOONBOUND ABOUT?
Maaaannnn....I don't know, I really don't know. In case those semi-contradictory paragraphs above didn't give you a clue. Also, to really talk about it would involve a few pages on my part and several spoilers.

Let's start with this: the events of the book begin in the year 13777. The number of things that the human race has gone through—cultural, technological, societal, scientific, and political changes (revolutions, really) are impossible to describe. Civilizations have come and gone—the planet Earth looks little like it does now, and humanity isn't much like it is now (except humans are going to be human—it's like Doctor Who's far future episodes that way—just without the space travel). Even the Moon—the Moon, for crying out loud—isn't the same.

In William Goldman's The Princess Bride (and the movie does something very similar), Goldman talks about his father coming in while he's sick to read him a book by S. Morgenstern.

“Does it have any sports in it?”

“Fencing. Fighting. Torture. Poison. True Love. Hate. Revenge. Giants. Hunters. Bad men. Good men. Beautifulest Ladies. Snakes. Spiders. Beasts of all natures and descriptions. Pain. Death. Brave men. Coward men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passion. Miracles.”

“Sounds okay,” I said and I kind of closed my eyes.

Similarly, let me tell you a little about what Moonbound contains:
Knights. Brothers. Talking swords. Dragons. Friendship. Robots. Bogs (which are very different than swamps). Raiders. Wizards. Bees that give direction. Gleaning coffee shops. Climate Warrior Beavers. Constructive debates (literally). Genetic engineering. Legendary warriors. Forty-three million dimensions.* Pizza rolls. Trash-pickers.

* Not really like Marvel's Multiverse, more like the mathematical concept of three-dimensional or four-dimensional space, but much, much more expanded.

I'm not sure that's helpful, but it's something.

We begin when our protagonist, a boy named Ariel de la Sauvage, finds the remains of one of the greatest warriors in human history. This discovery ends up starting a chain of events that will lead to Ariel being on the run from the Wizard who rules the valley Ariel and his brother have grown up in—not just grown up in, but have never left. They have no knowledge of anything outside this valley—if anything exists beyond it, really. But to overthrow the Wizard and save his brother, Ariel will have to go into the wider world and learn about it. He needs experiences that his valley cannot give him. Equipped with this education and experience, Ariel should be able to confront the wizard and rescue his brother and the rest of the people he grew up surrounded by.

Oh, and he's guided throughout this by an AI who has the accumulated knowledge of most of human history and is currently residing in a microorganism that has implanted itself in Ariel's body.

Clear as mud, right?

STORY
More than anything else—and there's a lot of "anything else"—this is a novel about Story. The power of story to shape reality, to shape our expectations, the way we go about our lives, and the way we need others to go about their lives. The stories we tell ourselves about ourselves. The stories we tell others about ourselves. The stories that others tell us about themselves—and us. The stories that societies, governments, and other groups tell us and others about themselves and us.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, Moonbound about the way we can re-write our stories, the way we can take control of them (once we realize the story being told) and change things.

SO, WHAT DID I THINK ABOUT MOONBOUND?
That's a great question, and one I've been chewing on for more than a week now. I want to read this at least two more times before I think I'll be ready to answer that. Maybe the fact that I want to read this at least two more times in the next year or so gives you and me both a hint about what I think about it.

I haven't been able to stop thinking about this book since I started reading it two weeks ago. Part of that is to think about what I read and decide what Sloan was doing and what I thought about it. Another part of that thinking is just reveling in just how strange and wonderful it was.

While reading, when I was able to stop thinking things like, "what is going on here?" or "What is Sloan trying to accomplish?" and just enjoy it and get caught up in the story—I was able to lose myself in the book. And that got easier the further into the book I got. But I also spent an awful amount of time just trying to suss things out and overthinking things.

I don't think that's a bug when it comes to this book—it's a feature. Sloan has given the reader so much to take in, that if you're not chewing on almost every idea, you're doing the book and yourself a disservice. But it's also the kind of book you can relax with and enjoy. At a certain point in the book, Ariel learns to lay back and float in water—which is both one of those things that takes effort and can be incredibly relaxing at the same time. Like him, the reader has to learn how to "float" in this book. And when you do, you'll be rewarded. How greatly you'll be rewarded, I'm not sure—but you will be.

I'm not going to give this a star rating—sorry if that's what you're looking for. I just don't know (in case I haven't used that phrase enough yet in this post)—I can both defend every rating from 3-5 Stars, and I can wage a better argument against each of those. I encourage readers who find anything I've rambled about above intriguing, fans of Sloan, or people who read what the Publisher's site says to give it a shot. And then let's get together and talk about it, because I'd love to bounce some spoilery ideas off of someone.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from Farrar, Straus and Giroux via NetGalley—thanks to both for this.
  hcnewton | Jun 6, 2024 |
It's gonna be a Robin Sloan sci-fi summer! I can't wait to read this :3 And the fact this Sloan has mentioned this is part of a bigger project simply has me salivating at the possibilities...
  deborahee | Feb 23, 2024 |
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"It is eleven thousand years from now. A lot has happened, and yet a lot is still very familiar. Ariel is a boy in a small town under a wizard's rule. Like many adventurers before him, Ariel is called to explore a world full of unimaginable glories and challenges: unknown enemies, a mission to save the world, a girl. Here, as they say, be dragons. But none of this happens before Ariel comes across an artifact from an earlier civilization, a sentient, record-keeping artificial intelligence that carries with it the perspective of the whole of human history--and becomes both Ariel's greatest ally and the narrator of our story. Moonbound is an adventure into the richest depths of Story itself. It is a deeply satisfying epic of ancient scale, blasted through the imaginative prism one of our most forward-thinking writers. And this is only the beginning"--

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