Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

A Writer at War. Vasily Grossman with the Red Army 1941-1945

de Vasily Grossman

Outros autores: Alexis Berelowitch

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0452119,878 (4.05)52
A special correspondent for The Red Star, the Red Army's newspaper, documents the savage battles of World War II, the siege of Stalingrad, the great tank battle of Kursk, the defense of Moscow, and early revelations about the Holocaust. Based on the notebooks in which Vasily Grossman gathered the raw materials for his newspaper articles, this book depicts as never before the crushing condition on the Eastern Front during World War II and the lives and deaths of infantrymen, tank drivers, pilots, snipers, and civilians. Deemed unfit for service when the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, Grossman became a special correspondent for 'The Red Star, ' the Red Army newspaper. A portly novelist in his mid-thirties with no military experience, he was given a uniform and hastily taught how to use a pistol. Remarkably, he spent three of the next four years at the front, observing with a writer's eye the most pitiless fighting ever recorded. Grossman witnessed almost all the major events of the Eastern Front: the appalling defeats and desperate retreats of 1941, the defense of Moscow, and the fighting in the Ukraine. In August 1942 he was posted to Stalingrad, where he remained during four brutal months of street fighting. Grossman was present at the battle of Kursk (the largest tank engagement in history), and, as the Red Army advanced, he reached Berdichev, where his worst fears for his mother and other relatives were confirmed. A Jew himself, he undertook the faithful recording of Holocaust atrocities as their extent dawned. His supremely powerful report 'The hell of Treblinka' was used in evidence at the Nuremberg tribunal. Anthony Beever, a historian, along with Luba Vinogradova, have woven Grossman's notebooks into a fluid, compelling narrative that gives us one of the best descriptions- at once unflinching and sensitive- of what Grossman called 'the ruthless truth of war.' -- from Book Jacket.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 52 menções

Tradução indireta, feita a partir da versão em inglês ( )
  HelioKonishi | May 13, 2022 |
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Grossman, VasilyAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Berelowitch, Alexisautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Astroff, CatherineTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Beevor, AntonyTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carlsen, Arne-CarstenTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carlsen, JorunnTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Casotti, BrunoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ettinger, HelmutTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Guiod, JacquesTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gyaros, LászlóTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Madariaga, JuanmariTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Magnusson, HansTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moerdijk, HenkTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vinogradova, LubaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
[None]
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
[None]
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Vasily Grossman's place in the history of world literature is assured by his masterpiece Life and Fate, one of the greatest Russian novels of the twentieth century. (Introduction)
Any translation from the Russian which hopes to be readable in English requires a slight compression of the original, through the deletion of superfluous words and repetitions. (Translator's note)
Front, when written with a capital letter refers to the Soviet equivalent of an army group, for example, Central Front, Western Front or Stalingrad Front. (Glossary)
Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union began in the early hours on 22 June 1941.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The PPZh was the slang term for a ‘campaign wife’, because the full term, pokhodno polevaya zhena, was similar to PPSh, the standard Red Army sub-machine gun. Campaign wives were young nurses and women soldiers from a headquarters—such as signalers and clerks—who usually wore a beret on the back of the head rather than the fore-and-aft pilotka cap. They found themselves virtually forced to become the concubines of senior officers. Grossman also scribbled down some bitter notes on the subject, perhaps for use in a story later.
    Women—PPZh. Note about Nachakho, chief of administrative supplies department. She cried for a week, and then went to him.
    ‘Who’s that?’
    ‘The general’s PPZh.’
    ‘And the commissar hasn’t got one.’
    Before the attack. Three o’clock in the morning.
    ‘Where’s the general?’ [someone asks].
    ‘Sleeping with his whore,’ the sentry murmurs.
    And these girls had once wanted to be ‘Tanya’, or Zoya Kosmodemyanskaya.
    ‘Whose PPZh is she?’
    ‘A member of the Military Council’s.’
    Yet all around them tens of thousands of girls in military uniforms are working hard and with dignity.
A number of Soviet generals did not shrink from hitting even quite senior subordinates, although the striking of soldiers by officers and NCOs had been one of the most hated characteristics of the Tsarist Army.
    Conversation of Colonels Shuba and Tarasov with the army commander:
    ‘“What?”
    ‘“May I say again...?”
    ‘“What?”
    ‘“May I say again...?”
    ‘He hit Shuba in the mouth. I [presumably Tarasov] stood still, drew my tongue in and clenched my teeth, because I was afraid to bite my tongue off or be left with no teeth.’
Suffering seemed to have become a universal face. Towards the end of the month, Grossman received a letter from his wife, Olga Mikhailovna, in which she recounted the death of her son, Misha, who had been killed by a bomb. He wrote back in a clumsy attempt to mitigate her despair.
    My own one, my good one. Today I received your letter which someone had brought from Moscow. It grieved deeply. Don’t let your spirits sink, Lyusenka. Don’t give way to despair. There is so much sorrow around us. I see so much of it. I’ve seen mothers who have lost three sons and a husband in this war, I’ve seen wives who’ve lost husbands and children, I’ve seen women whose little children have been killed in a bombing raid, and all these people don’t give way to despair. They work, they look forward to victory, they don’t lose their spirits. And in what hard conditions they have to survive! Be strong, too, my darling, hold on . . . You’ve got me and Fedya, you have love and your life has a meaning.

    I’ve been recommended for the Order of the Red Star for the second time, but to no effect so far, just as before. I’ve got this letter taken from a dead soldier; it’s written in a child’s scribble. There are the following words at the end: ‘I miss you very much. Please come and visit, I so want to see you, if only for one hour. I am writing this, and tears are pouring. Daddy, please come and visit.’
Like the other snipers, Zaitsev seemed to be proud of taking revenge on any Russian woman seen associating with a German.
    Zaitsev has killed a woman and a German officer: ‘They fell across each other.’
He also interviewed a teacher who had been raped by a German officer.
    Teacher (I decided not to ask her name and surname). At night, an officer, helped by his orderly, raped her. She was holding a six-month-old baby in her arms. He fired at the floor, threatening to kill the baby. The orderly went away and locked the door. Some of our prisoners of war were in the next room. She cried out and called, but there was dead silence in the next room.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (4)

A special correspondent for The Red Star, the Red Army's newspaper, documents the savage battles of World War II, the siege of Stalingrad, the great tank battle of Kursk, the defense of Moscow, and early revelations about the Holocaust. Based on the notebooks in which Vasily Grossman gathered the raw materials for his newspaper articles, this book depicts as never before the crushing condition on the Eastern Front during World War II and the lives and deaths of infantrymen, tank drivers, pilots, snipers, and civilians. Deemed unfit for service when the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, Grossman became a special correspondent for 'The Red Star, ' the Red Army newspaper. A portly novelist in his mid-thirties with no military experience, he was given a uniform and hastily taught how to use a pistol. Remarkably, he spent three of the next four years at the front, observing with a writer's eye the most pitiless fighting ever recorded. Grossman witnessed almost all the major events of the Eastern Front: the appalling defeats and desperate retreats of 1941, the defense of Moscow, and the fighting in the Ukraine. In August 1942 he was posted to Stalingrad, where he remained during four brutal months of street fighting. Grossman was present at the battle of Kursk (the largest tank engagement in history), and, as the Red Army advanced, he reached Berdichev, where his worst fears for his mother and other relatives were confirmed. A Jew himself, he undertook the faithful recording of Holocaust atrocities as their extent dawned. His supremely powerful report 'The hell of Treblinka' was used in evidence at the Nuremberg tribunal. Anthony Beever, a historian, along with Luba Vinogradova, have woven Grossman's notebooks into a fluid, compelling narrative that gives us one of the best descriptions- at once unflinching and sensitive- of what Grossman called 'the ruthless truth of war.' -- from Book Jacket.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.05)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 3
3 16
3.5 12
4 57
4.5 5
5 42

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 207,127,456 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível