Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn: The Destruction of Wildlife for Traditional…

de Richard Ellis

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
304647,593 (3)Nenhum(a)
In parts of Korea and China, moon bears, black but for the crescent-shaped patch of white on their chests, are captured in the wild and brought to "bear farms" where they are imprisoned in squeeze cages, and a steel catheter is inserted into their gall bladders. The dripping bile is collected as a cure for ailments ranging from an upset stomach to skin burns. The bear may live as long as fifteen years in this state. Rhinos are being illegally poached for their horns, as are tigers for their bones, thought to improve virility. Booming economies and growing wealth in parts of Asia are increasing demand for these precious medicinals. Already endangered species are being sacrificed for temporary treatments for nausea and erectile dysfunction. Richard Ellis, one of the world's foremost experts in wildlife extinction, brings his alarm to the pages of Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn, in the hope that through an exposure of this drug trade, something can be done to save the animals most direly threatened. Trade in animal parts for traditional Chinese medicine is a leading cause of species endangerment in Asia, and poaching is increasing at an alarming rate. Most of traditional Chinese medicine relies on herbs and other plants, and is not a cause for concern. Ellis illuminates those aspects of traditional medicine, but as wildlife habitats are shrinking for the hunted large species, the situation is becoming ever more critical. One hundred years ago, there were probably 100,000 tigers in India, South China, Sumatra, Bali, Java, and the Russian Far East. The South Chinese, Caspian, Balinese, and Javan species are extinct. There are now fewer than 5,000 tigers in all of India, and the numbers are dropping fast. There are five species of rhinoceros--three in Asia and two in Africa--and all have been hunted to near extinction so their horns can be ground into powder, not for aphrodisiacs, as commonly thought, but for ailments ranging from arthritis to depression. In 1930, there were 80,000 black rhinos in Africa. Now there are fewer than 2,500. Tigers, bears, and rhinos are not the only animals pursued for the sake of alleviating human ills--the list includes musk deer, sharks, saiga antelope, seahorses, porcupines, monkeys, beavers, and sea lions--but the dwindling numbers of those rare species call us to attention. Ellis tells us what has been done successfully, and contemplates what can and must be done to save these animals or, sadly, our children will witness the extinction of tigers, rhinos, and moon bears in their lifetime.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Exibindo 4 de 4
This book takes a look at Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and its effect on wildlife populations, some endangered. Ellis looks more specifically at rhinos, tigers and bears.

It's a very good, informative book, and I don't think the author takes sides (although I am firmly in one camp on the issue, so my judgment could be clouded). He presents a lot of statistics, and it's hard to see how TCM isn't affecting the populations of these endangered species. Yes, there are other things affecting it, as well, but to see what some of these animal parts are worth (in some cases, more than gold), can leave little doubt as to why they are being poached. Of course, there are also other things affecting the numbers of these species, most notably, human encroachment, but the focus of this book is on TCM. The chapter on bears is tough, with the descriptions of extracting bear bile from live bears, but I think people need to know what's going on. There was also a really interesting chapter comparing the history of TCM to the history of Western medicine, and they are surprisingly similar, until more recent times.

And now, one day after writing my review (though I haven't yet posted it anywhere), I read that one subspecies of rhino is officially extinct, partly due to TCM and poaching. One that was barely holding on when this book was written. ( )
  LibraryCin | May 8, 2021 |
A look at Traditional Chinese Medicine, and its impact on endangered species. The writing style is a bit sluggish and uninteresting, and the author makes too many statements about the effectiveness of the treatments without any evidence to back up his claims. The book also suffered from an overwhelming amount of redundancy. ( )
  Devil_llama | Apr 9, 2011 |
The author mentions in the preface how this book ended "heavier on quotes than it might have been." I'll say. I reached the point where even when a page did not contain a citation I would often find my attention wandering to note the fact of there being no citation. I would be less harsh with my rating if it wasn't for his having authored at least 14 previous books. He says this one is different since it deals with medicine - something he is not particularly knowledgeable about. Fair enough. He should know about writing compelling narrative. Fair enough? ( )
  KevinTexas | Sep 13, 2009 |
I picked up this book at the library. I was researching TCM and its impact on tiger populations for a presentation. This book was interesting but I found that it bogged down when discussing all the non-governmental organizations and their roles in protecting the tiger. Ellis is a journalist, not a biologist, and therfore has a somewhat unique take on the subject. However, I must admit that I basically skimmed the last quarter or so of the book. The discussion of the NGOs just did not interest me at all. I would have enjoyed a closer look at TCM itself without all the NGO stuff. ( )
1 vote susanbevans | Aug 19, 2008 |
Exibindo 4 de 4
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (4)

In parts of Korea and China, moon bears, black but for the crescent-shaped patch of white on their chests, are captured in the wild and brought to "bear farms" where they are imprisoned in squeeze cages, and a steel catheter is inserted into their gall bladders. The dripping bile is collected as a cure for ailments ranging from an upset stomach to skin burns. The bear may live as long as fifteen years in this state. Rhinos are being illegally poached for their horns, as are tigers for their bones, thought to improve virility. Booming economies and growing wealth in parts of Asia are increasing demand for these precious medicinals. Already endangered species are being sacrificed for temporary treatments for nausea and erectile dysfunction. Richard Ellis, one of the world's foremost experts in wildlife extinction, brings his alarm to the pages of Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn, in the hope that through an exposure of this drug trade, something can be done to save the animals most direly threatened. Trade in animal parts for traditional Chinese medicine is a leading cause of species endangerment in Asia, and poaching is increasing at an alarming rate. Most of traditional Chinese medicine relies on herbs and other plants, and is not a cause for concern. Ellis illuminates those aspects of traditional medicine, but as wildlife habitats are shrinking for the hunted large species, the situation is becoming ever more critical. One hundred years ago, there were probably 100,000 tigers in India, South China, Sumatra, Bali, Java, and the Russian Far East. The South Chinese, Caspian, Balinese, and Javan species are extinct. There are now fewer than 5,000 tigers in all of India, and the numbers are dropping fast. There are five species of rhinoceros--three in Asia and two in Africa--and all have been hunted to near extinction so their horns can be ground into powder, not for aphrodisiacs, as commonly thought, but for ailments ranging from arthritis to depression. In 1930, there were 80,000 black rhinos in Africa. Now there are fewer than 2,500. Tigers, bears, and rhinos are not the only animals pursued for the sake of alleviating human ills--the list includes musk deer, sharks, saiga antelope, seahorses, porcupines, monkeys, beavers, and sea lions--but the dwindling numbers of those rare species call us to attention. Ellis tells us what has been done successfully, and contemplates what can and must be done to save these animals or, sadly, our children will witness the extinction of tigers, rhinos, and moon bears in their lifetime.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5 1
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5 1

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 163,414,787 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível