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The Wild Places (2007)

de Robert Macfarlane

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Explores the changing ideas of the wild in Great Britain and Ireland, from the cliffs of Cape Wrath and the storm-beaches of Norfolk to the saltmarshes and estuaries of Essex and the moors of Rannoch and the Pennines.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
An ode to wild nature, both grand and miniscule. ( )
  dele2451 | May 13, 2024 |
This one was not as lyrical, scholarly, or tight-knit as the other Macfarlane's books I have read. ( )
  Treebeard_404 | Jan 23, 2024 |
astonishing use of language to describe places that are wild and far from home - and just to mix it up - places that are intertwined with our daily lives - I give you Holloways
historical record includes description of suppression of Catholic worship - cf w fictional account A Most Contagious Game by Catherine Aird - learned more from reading these two books than in all my history classes
to buy: look for first paperback ed for high quality paper - would like to have for index and bibliography ( )
  Overgaard | Dec 27, 2021 |
Really enjoyable & well-written account of how the wild is all around us http://www.susanhatedliterature.net/2018/04/the-wild-places/ ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
The Wild Places by Robert Macfarlane Ostensibly about his endeavour to find the wild places that still exist in the UK staring from Scotland and kind of working his way down to end up in Essex where I think the BBC made a TV program about him wandering through Essex discovering wonders of wildlife hidden in plain sight throughout the industrial wastelands.
 
Anyway, he is in Essex on the trail of J.A. Baker who wrote The Peregrine, one of my all time favourite non-fiction books. It is interesting to note that like J.A. Baker he seems to exist in world devoid of all the trivialities that consume ours.
 
He did mention working (just once) and having a daughter (about 3 times) but outside of that he seems to exist only on this metaphysical journey where he is ping-ponging around the UK, hooking up with other men and disappearing into crags, gullies, downs, moors, mountains, islands, lochs and god know where else for periods of time.
 
He certainly never seemed to have to be anywhere else. That's why I found the irony of him doing a TV program kinda surreal because he appears to live in a world that doesn't have one. I don't have a TV but I certainly live in this world. Was I jealous I wondered?
 
Definitely impressed, to say the least.Also based on the premise that "to wander is to wonder" and the link between roving and reflection being described in many books each of which he quotes. A landscape walked and history filled in as you go.
 
Much off it sad, especially when he deals with (just one part) of the highland clearances. Do they teach that stuff in schools? I loved and struggled with this book at the same time. This is the second of his books that I have read and I warmed to him on this one. At the end of every chapter I wanted to get in my car and drive to these places and I would have, had it not been for the 19,000 Kms between him and me and the fact that I have a job to go to, but all the same.....Another of his themes was about how close all this is to what we call reality and what he calls roads and housing estates. How all this stuff is simply still there if you are willing to get out of the car and walk for a bit. Incredibly true it appears.This is one book that I wished was on my Kindle instead of the mass of paper that it was.
 
Why so? Well there were so many words that I didn't recognise and on the Kindle you simply point to the word and the definition pops up at the top or bottom of the screen.
 
Not just old fashioned arcane words but beautiful poetic descriptive words. Lots of them. I used the Kindle's dictionary instead realising that it has been a while since I came across so many hitherto unknown words.
 
He may have been writing about Essex but he certainly never went to school there, that's for sure. ( )
1 vote Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
It is in the end a deeply stirring book, in being able to find the vivid wild in places that are so trammelled with our sterile banks of knowledge about them. In using the body to step beyond the ironic into an immediacy of a tangible, audible, testable world. In reversing what Macfarlane calls "the retreat from the real". Wildness becomes not some fragmentary thing surviving in scraps and fragments which have to be fenced around with a busy protectiveness. It is much much more than that.
 
Macfarlane also feels on the outside of things. This is partly because wildness in early 21st-century Britain is a hard thing to find - pushed to the margins (or so he begins by thinking), where it has not been entirely vanquished by pollution and modern farming and population growth. Then there are the difficulties created by the shortcomings of language to express what he feels, and the problems of containing a proper emotional response to a landscape within a more analytic appreciation of its qualities. "I could not explain what it really looked like," he says early in the book, when visiting an island cave, "certainly not what I was doing there, among the red and purple basalts." Later, the same note returns: "Open spaces bring to the mind something which is difficult to express"; "we find it hard to make language grip landscapes that are close-toned".
adicionado por steevohenderson | editarGuardian, Andrew Motion (Aug 25, 2007)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (13 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Robert Macfarlaneautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Dyer, PeterDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Groen, NicoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Explores the changing ideas of the wild in Great Britain and Ireland, from the cliffs of Cape Wrath and the storm-beaches of Norfolk to the saltmarshes and estuaries of Essex and the moors of Rannoch and the Pennines.

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