Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't):…
Carregando...

I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't): Making the Journey from "What… (edição: 2007)

de Brené Brown (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8871518,453 (4.26)32
We spend too much precious time and energy managing perception and creating carefully edited versions of ourselves to show to the world. As hard as we try, we can't seem to turn off the tapes that fill our heads with messages like "Never good enough " and "What will people think?" Why? What fuels this unattainable need to look like we always have it all together? At first glance we might think it's because we admire perfection, but that's not the case. We are actually the most attracted to people we consider to be authentic and down-to-earth. We love people who are "real"--we're drawn to those who both embrace their imperfections and radiate self-acceptance. There is a constant barrage of social expectations that teach us that being imperfect is synonymous with being inadequate. Everywhere we turn there are messages that tell us who, what, and how we're supposed to be. So we learn to hide our struggles and protect ourselves from shame, judgment, criticism, and blame by seeking safety in pretending and perfection. Based on seven years of groundbreaking research and hundreds of interviews, I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn't) shines a long-overdue light on an important truth: Our imperfections are what connect us to one another and to our humanity. Our vulnerabilities are not weaknesses; they are powerful reminders to keep our hearts and minds open to the reality that we're all in this together. Dr. Brown writes, "We need our lives back. It's time to reclaim the gifts of imperfection--the courage to be real, the compassion we need to love ourselves and others, and the connection that gives true purpose and meaning to life. These are the gifts that bring love, laughter, gratitude, empathy, and joy into our lives."… (mais)
Membro:CVMBSTraineeResLib
Título:I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't): Making the Journey from "What Will People Think?" to "I Am Enough"
Autores:Brené Brown (Autor)
Informação:Avery (2007), Edition: 1, 336 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn't): Making the Journey From "What Will People Think?" to "I Am Enough." de Brené Brown

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 32 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Review by Family Resource Centre staff, Jessica: "She assigns words to a concept that was previously ambiguous."
Brene Brown is currently the most celebrated author regarding the topic of shame. In this book and in her other works and presentations, she does a great job of defining what shame is, distinguishing it from other similar feelings (e.g. embarrassment or guilt), and presenting real-world examples from her clients.

This book is written from a female-lens, examining the shame felt by women in terms of appearance, work/family-life balance, relationships and parenting. Brene is really good at capturing how shame seeps in and is almost normalized in day-to-day life, for example, a woman making up stories to cover up the fact that she forgot to bring a food contribution to her son's school event. This woman associated a simple occasion of forgetfulness as meaning "I am a bad mother." Rather than just feeling an impartial guilt towards the action (e.g. "I feel bad for forgetting to make something"), she tied her self-worth to the event. Later, she feels worse, ashamed for both forgetting to bring something, and then lying about it. In these types of cases, Brene looks at how these thought patterns became instilled in the person, and from what influences.

I enjoy how Brene looks at our 'shame web' and has people think from small to grand scales where messages of shame come from. For example, at a large scale, the idea of being a perfect mom who has everything "just so" is often projected in commercials, movies, magazines and anecdotal stories ("My mom would kill me if I messed up the kitchen, it is always spotless for guests."). At a local level, perhaps this woman's surrounding neighbourhood values image over substance -- they would be more impressed to see what other people bring, wear, or do, rather than actually getting to know them as a person. At a more personal level, these shame messages may be repeated by her friends, siblings, and parents to the point that she feels it is normal, and therefore something must be wrong with her if she is not fitting into their definition of perfection. By determining all of these influences in the shame web, a person can more realistically look at their situation and realize that perhaps these ideas only exist in the specific environment or role they're in, but it does not mean that it's a universal truth. For example, would the woman's husband or son feel the same level of shame about forgetting to bring a food item to school? Since their shame webs would be composed of different people and places, this particular event may not invoke the same feelings for them, even though the actual situation is the same for everyone.

Towards the end of this book, much of the message becomes repetitive. I find that Brene's gift is more storytelling, rather than developing tools or frameworks. She includes a few "diagrams" of the shame web, though I personally found the diagrams useless, it looks like a simple spider web that doesn't depict the concept any better than reading about it. Some books do an amazing job of creating tools and tables to help us filter our situation through the framework they've developed, like when using worksheets, and sometimes those tools and definitions can stick with you and give you "aha" moments. With Brene's books, even though she does provide worksheets on her website, I find her exercises lack a sense of continuity and structure. It's better to read or watch her materials for the stories she presents.

Overall, Brene is an entertaining personality who brings to life the people in her case stories. What she has gleaned about the interconnected and subtle network of shame in everyday life is remarkable -- because of how ordinary shame has become. She assigns words to a concept that was previously ambiguous. Before it was hard to draw lines between shame, guilt, pride, criticism, self-improvement, anxiety, the desire to fit in, and fleeting embarrassment. Her work helps us identify the how and why we've come to see ourselves (and others) the way we do. ( )
  familyresourcecentre | Dec 12, 2019 |
This is a fascinating and wondrous account of the concept of shame. It mainly focuses on how women react to shame, but the book can be applied to men as well. Contained within the book are several tips and ideas used to identify your personal sources of shame and methods used to deal with them. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
There is no perfect way to say this, but while it's a good book, it's never going to be something that I'll reread. Just to be clear, this was a book of the month for my book club. It's targeted towards women. We struggle a LOT with shame. Very few of us seem to be resilient to shame because it's not something that is ingrained in us. Resiliency towards shame is a coping skill that very few of us have ever mastered on our own. It's no wonder that so many of us need therapy to deal with our work lives.

I work for one of the largest companies on the planet. I do the best I can every day and it's nothing unusual to get some stinging criticism for my best efforts. I'm judged by numbers and nothing else. That's all I am to my superiors. It's all I can do to keep my composure. So yes, I know very well what it's like to be shamed for my best efforts. It eats away at your self-esteem/self-worth. It makes you cringe at the very idea of coming back the next day and the next day after that and so on.

Aside from that, I can also relate to the person in the book who told Ms. Brown about the shame she received from her mother for her weight. I've been there. It's not fun being judged by numbers. We forget that we are so much more than a number. We are human. We have feelings and we need to be valued. Instead, we are a society that tears each other down in order to boost ourselves up. In doing so, we are only creating another generation of people who will carry on the same behaviors that we can't escape.

While the book was relatable in so many ways, it was also unrelatable when it comes to the "mommy wars." Goodness, there is so much judgment and harsh criticism flying all over the place. We all want the same thing: to be good parents raising children to be good upstanding citizens. I wish that we women were more supportive of each other.

I saw so much of myself in these pages that I honestly don't want to revisit this book. Would I recommend it to others? Yes and no. It is a book worth reading, but I'm not going to force anyone to pick it up. It is insightful. It is helpful. But it's not going to fix everything for you.
( )
  caslater83 | Jun 2, 2019 |
An exploration into the power of shame, the value of vulnerability, and the development of shame resilience, primarily directed toward women.

The author is now world famous for her research and work into vulnerability and shame. In this book she explores the various ways in which women, in particular, feel shame, and the best ways of developing resilience to handle such shame and be able to live with greater self-esteem, value, and vulnerability in proper contexts.

At this point in her work the author had only begun to explore the effects of shame on men and children; they are addressed perfunctorily at the end of the work, although even there is good insight. I imagine in the period since the work she has done more research and effort to this end.

Nevertheless, valuable in considering the shame triggers for women and the development and encouragement of resilience. ( )
  deusvitae | May 18, 2019 |
I was excited when I heard about this book, but I was pretty disappointed, and I didn't finish it. It just didn't seem to offer anything new for me. ( )
  anitatally | Feb 28, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Brown, Brenéautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Fortgang, LaurenNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

We spend too much precious time and energy managing perception and creating carefully edited versions of ourselves to show to the world. As hard as we try, we can't seem to turn off the tapes that fill our heads with messages like "Never good enough " and "What will people think?" Why? What fuels this unattainable need to look like we always have it all together? At first glance we might think it's because we admire perfection, but that's not the case. We are actually the most attracted to people we consider to be authentic and down-to-earth. We love people who are "real"--we're drawn to those who both embrace their imperfections and radiate self-acceptance. There is a constant barrage of social expectations that teach us that being imperfect is synonymous with being inadequate. Everywhere we turn there are messages that tell us who, what, and how we're supposed to be. So we learn to hide our struggles and protect ourselves from shame, judgment, criticism, and blame by seeking safety in pretending and perfection. Based on seven years of groundbreaking research and hundreds of interviews, I Thought It Was Just Me (But It Isn't) shines a long-overdue light on an important truth: Our imperfections are what connect us to one another and to our humanity. Our vulnerabilities are not weaknesses; they are powerful reminders to keep our hearts and minds open to the reality that we're all in this together. Dr. Brown writes, "We need our lives back. It's time to reclaim the gifts of imperfection--the courage to be real, the compassion we need to love ourselves and others, and the connection that gives true purpose and meaning to life. These are the gifts that bring love, laughter, gratitude, empathy, and joy into our lives."

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.26)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 15
3.5 2
4 31
4.5 6
5 42

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 162,395,102 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível