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The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer…
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The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century… (original: 1979; edição: 2000)

de Sandra M. Gilbert (Autor)

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1,180712,640 (4.06)66
In this work the authors explore the works of many 19th-century women writers. They chart a tangible desire expressed for freedom from the restraints of a confining patriarchal society and trace a distinctive female literary tradition.
Membro:MariaLW
Título:The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S)
Autores:Sandra M. Gilbert (Autor)
Informação:Yale University Press (2000), Edition: Subsequent, 768 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination de Sandra M. Gilbert (1979)

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This book is considered a classic and it is easy to understand why. It's an extremely thorough (and, yes, extremely long) investigation of female writers of the nineteenth century and of how their experiences of being women, and women writers, shaped their works. I particularly appreciated the discussion of Austen and Charlotte Brontë, but felt that some of the arguments became a little repetitive as the text went on. I think that part of that stemmed from the fact that it is a work of sustained, deep literary analysis, covering many individual novels and poems, and is probably at its best when dipped into with a focus on a particular author. I think that it reads as being a little dated in places as well–the psychology/psychotherapy aspects stood out to me in particular as I tend to check out mentally when Freud is mentioned ;p ( )
  Tara_Calaby | Jun 22, 2020 |
Yes, it's dated, but for my generation this was so exciting. This made going to grad school feel like punk rock (for grad students, so, y'know, not that punk). We were going to change the academy & then the world & Gilbert & Gubar were showing us how.
Try to read this book as if it's the first or at most second piece of feminist criticism you've ever read. Imagine Austen & the Brontes and Dickinson constantly trivialized and George Eliot lauded for her masculine writing in everything you've seen before. Try to think about Bertha Rochester's life as completely unproblematic. Then read this book and you'll get a sense of what we felt. ( )
1 vote susanbooks | Nov 17, 2018 |
Another university textbook I've been meaning to read cover-to-cover for a long time. Famous enough that everyone ignores the clever title and just calls it "Gilbert & Gubar", over 600 pages long, and with in-depth studies of half a dozen of the biggest names in nineteenth-century literature, it's a daunting prospect. Happily it turns out to be eminently readable, much more so than I remember from when I was writing essays - maybe my standards have changed?

The really important thing about it, of course, is that it's one of the books that made respectable the idea that we need to look at the work of women writers in terms of their role as women in the society of the time, and also bearing in mind that they were writing for a largely female audience. (G&G appeared in 1979, about the same time as Elaine Showalter's A literature of their own.) Where more recent feminist critique tends to mix in other theoretical approaches, G&G look almost exclusively at how women writers deal with and aare influenced by the situation of women in the society of their times, and their own role as women writers in particular. How do you deal with the assertive act of speaking out in print in a society where the ideal of feminine behaviour is supposed to be passive and silent? Despite the famous, aggressively Freudian, opening line, there is little or no recourse to the usual male authority-figures of lit-crit (Marx, Freud, Derrida, Barthes, Foucault...). Virginia Woolf, of course, is quoted heavily, and G&G have quite a bit to say about how 19th century women writers saw each others' work.

One part I found especially interesting was the discussion of how women writers engaged with Milton: maybe an obvious question to pose for Frankenstein and Middlemarch, but not at all self-evident for Wuthering Heights until you've seen their analysis.

With hindsight, one of the surprising things about the book is the way it sticks to the narrowly-defined "canon" of 19th century English writing - there is only the very briefest discussion of Victorian popular novelists who have since fallen out of favour (Mrs Oliphant, Charlotte M. Yonge, Harriet Beecher Stowe, etc.), and apart from Emily Dickinson there is nothing about women writers who were relatively unknown in their own time. Obviously the reason for this is that they want to concentrate their energy on the writers who have received the lioness's share of critical attention and show how looking at them as women can change our perception of their work and what it is trying to say. Rediscovering writers who were unfairly neglected isn't part of their remit. But it does mean that you shouldn't try to use this book on its own to get a view of women's writing in 19th century England (and New England...). Let alone anywhere else. ( )
1 vote thorold | Jul 20, 2015 |
Forum, June 8, 2015 ( )
  clifforddham | Jun 8, 2015 |
This is must-reading for anyone who loves to read serious literature. My copy is dog-eared and marked up; I use it for reference and short reading, as it reads for me more like a text-book than a page-turner. However, it is on my bedside table. This was a watershed influence on my intellectual life. Highly recommended. ( )
  BarbBowling | Aug 22, 2010 |
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In this work the authors explore the works of many 19th-century women writers. They chart a tangible desire expressed for freedom from the restraints of a confining patriarchal society and trace a distinctive female literary tradition.

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