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Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, #5) de David…
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Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, #5) (original: 1999; edição: 2017)

de David French

Séries: The Witcher (8)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9272417,256 (3.97)6
"The Witcher returns in this action-packed sequel to The Tower of Swallows, in the New York Times bestselling series that inspired The Witcher video games. After walking through the portal in the Tower of Swallows while narrowly escaping death, Ciri finds herself in a completely different world... an Elven world. She is trapped with no way out. Time does not seem to exist and there are no obvious borders or portals to cross back into her home world. But this is Ciri, the child of prophecy, and she will not be defeated. She knows she must escape to finally rejoin the Witcher, Geralt, and his companions - and also to try to conquer her worst nightmare. Leo Bonhart, the man who chased, wounded and tortured Ciri, is still on her trail. And the world is still at war"--… (mais)
Membro:ShreyasDeshpande
Título:Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, #5)
Autores:David French
Informação:Orbit, Paperback, 531 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:tbr-fantasy-books-complete-series

Detalhes da Obra

Lady of the Lake de Andrzej Sapkowski (1999)

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Inglês (19)  Alemão (3)  Polonês (1)  Italiano (1)  Todos os idiomas (24)
Mostrando 1-5 de 24 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The last book of The Witcher saga! I loved the first half of the book with its parallel universes and the fact that the story of The Witcher is viewed as a type of distant land fairy tale. One thing that this author can do is create complex characters, meaning, no one is ever lawful good, everybody is chaotic (neutral, good or evil). Themes like misogyny, slavery and racial discrimination are all present in the story.

We discover that there are elves and humans living in different dimensions but everybody is trapped in their own worlds, except for some with unique powers who can travel between timelines.
Everybody is looking for Ciri because of her extraordinary powers. Elves can be as evil as humans and sorceresses. And Ciri is on her own quest to escape what everybody think is her destiny.

I took a few days to grasp the ending, which can be interpreted in different ways. Both The Witcher and Yennefer die and after their deaths Ciri leaves everything behind and go to a parallel universe where Galahad from the Arthurian legends lives. The book begins with Ciri talking to Galahad and so the whole book is the retelling of her story to him. .
I think the story is brilliantly written, with varying points of view, snippets of Dandelion's memoir "Half a Century of Poetry", a huge battle being described through its actual combatants suffering and the healers in a war field hospital.

But people die. Lots of characters die. And that's what makes this series "dark fantasy" in my opinion. It has the feel of a fairy tale without the happy ending. Or maybe the ending is happy depending on how you interpret the ending. I had mixed feelings in the end, but in my head the ending had this dramatic sad tone.

Excellent series overall with rich world building and interesting characters. It was a nice ride! ( )
  noisydeadlines | Jul 30, 2021 |
Wikipedia says that Umberto Eco is one of Sapkowski's favourite writers. I can definitely see that. Not only did I see a direct hommage to the Name of the Rose; I think that all Witcher's books function in a very similar way to Eco's: each book is a labyrinth of references to other works of literature. Everything is a symbol that refers you to something else. The Witcher has references not only to slavic mythology and folklore, but also to Tolkien (you have the Eye, and the Black Riders) and medieval literature. I am not just talking about the title Lady of the Lake, or the direct and obvious references to the Arthurian world. The entire narrative is built like an Arthurian novel, in some ways I could almost feel like I was reading Thomas Mallory or Chrétien de Troyes. The Witcher's quest is definitely a quest for the Grail. These stories are so layered, and I know that I am not aware of all the richness inside them. I know that next time I read these books there will be new layers for me to uncover.
And of course there are the characters, their personal journey, the vision of humanity, friendship, parenthood, life and death. And of course the sense of humour! These books are not only deep, they are great fun to read. However you can chose to either stay in the surface or delve deeper on the mysteries they have to offer. ( )
  Clarissa_ | May 11, 2021 |
I mostly enjoyed the story itself but throughout the series, I wasn’t particularly fond of the writing style. Despite there being a follow-on book, this seems to be the last book in the story about Ciri. It wraps up the major story arc. With the author having so much more experience, I had some hope that this story would be better put together than the previous books. That hope was misplaced.

I really, really don’t like the Inception model this guy adopted. A story about a girl by the lake telling a guy a story, and within that story are stories about stories about stories. The narrative constantly jumps around in time. Plus, this need to put the story inside another story leads to the author spending inordinate amounts of time creating and developing characters that mean f*** all and do nothing but drag down the plot.

I also felt that there was a lot of name dropping of places and myths that was done not for the sake of progressing the story in a meaningful way or even to do any meaningful world building, but just to titillate the reading audience.

I had a few problems with how the author handled the characters:

This ultimate ability that Ciri winds up with seems implausible because the way it’s set up, she would have used it more frequently on accident before being truly aware of it. Plus, if it can’t be bound, how was it bound when she was trapped (being vague here to not spoil the story)? And when she was no longer trapped, why did she not continue to use it?

I’m also really bothered by the way the author handled Ciri and Bonhart’s storyline. The conclusion doesn’t seem plausible.

If sorcerers/sorceresses are so powerful that they were crucial to winning battles against Nilfgaard, then why were they portrayed as being pathetically weak in the last scene in Rivia?

How does Ciri’s presence in the location of the closing scene jive with what she told the Lodge about Geralt and Yennefer?

At the beginning of the book, the author has one of his throwaway characters say that legends should have happy endings and not be gritty and real. And that’s what we wind up with, more or less. A deus ex machina. But even the need for the deus ex machina is bizarre, because it only happens when the author forces all of the characters to not use their abilities or to use them poorly for no reason other than to create the situation.

I have the next book. I guess I’m going to read it because I’ve come this far, but this book was really disappointing in a lot of ways. ( )
  SGTCat | Feb 25, 2021 |
2 stars because of the excellent battle. Otherwise a forgettable book.

I have become increasingly disenchanted with this series. The first two short story collections were excellent. They built up a rich and intriguing world while also bringing to the reader some very memorable characters. The writing was very well done.

All of that went away with the novels. It seems to me that the author has a problem with the format. he cannot handle pacing or endings. The first two books did not actually have any endings or climaxes. From the the third book onwards I got increasingly annoyed with character development.

Who is Ciri? A girl of destiny who spends the entire series getting traumatized, yet still in the final book remains naive. Her simple surrender at Castle Stygga to Vilgerforce was inexplicable.

Who is the Witcher? A very, very cool character in the short stories, he spends the novels getting caught up in events beyond his control, embarking on completely futile ill-informed quests, and somehow succeeds in the last book with a huge narrative jump that is never explained well.

Who is Yennefer? No clue really. After a rather interesting foster-mothership to Ciri to begin with she spends the entire series being imprisoned ot trying to escape from being imprisoned. That is literally all she does.

Also the author apparently learnt how to write female magic users from Robert Jordan. The continuous backbiting vindictiveness was exhausting.

The author tried a huge number of narrative strategies mostly consisting of flashbacks or historical narration, sometimes flashbacks within historical narration. What this did was introduce some completely inconsequential side-characters to the story.

Lastly, this series and this book has very little narrative momentum. This book is the series finale. Yet literally the first part of the book is mostly quite inconsequential stuff. The entire Jarre section could have been skipped. There is then a very good battle description, a very very forced climax, then an huge section of completely irrelevant politics which does not really draw interest. And then the rather bizarre ending. ( )
  Andorion | Feb 6, 2021 |
Utterly bonkers. What the heck?

The short story Witcher books are great. The five saga books get stranger and stranger, but you hang in there for the characters and to get some answers.

But this final book... you may as well pull it apart and stick the pages back together randomly. Not kidding.

I’m not even sure who survived and who died at the end. ( )
  Lorrrraine | Jan 16, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Andrzej Sapkowskiautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Belletti, RaffaellaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
French, DavidTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Simon, ErikTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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« E cavalcarono finché non raggiunsero la riva di un lago dalle acque vaste e amene, e in mezzo al lago Artù vide un braccio rivestito di sciamito bianco: terminava in una mano che impugnava una bella spada. [...] E videro una fanciulla camminare sul lago. Chi è quella fanciulla?’ chiese Artù. È la Signora del Lago’, rispose Merlino. »

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Era un lago incantato.
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"The Witcher returns in this action-packed sequel to The Tower of Swallows, in the New York Times bestselling series that inspired The Witcher video games. After walking through the portal in the Tower of Swallows while narrowly escaping death, Ciri finds herself in a completely different world... an Elven world. She is trapped with no way out. Time does not seem to exist and there are no obvious borders or portals to cross back into her home world. But this is Ciri, the child of prophecy, and she will not be defeated. She knows she must escape to finally rejoin the Witcher, Geralt, and his companions - and also to try to conquer her worst nightmare. Leo Bonhart, the man who chased, wounded and tortured Ciri, is still on her trail. And the world is still at war"--

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