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Femina: The instant Sunday Times bestseller…
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Femina: The instant Sunday Times bestseller – A New History of the Middle Ages, Through the Women Written Out of It (edição: 2023)

de Janina Ramirez (Autor)

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383667,896 (3.86)13
A groundbreaking reappraisal of medieval femininity, revealing why women have been written out of history and why it matters. The Middle Ages are seen as a bloodthirsty time of Vikings, saints and kings: a patriarchal society that oppressed and excluded women. But when we dig a little deeper into the truth, we can see that the "Dark" Ages were anything but. Oxford and BBC historian Janina Ramirez has uncovered countless influential women's names struck out of historical records, with the word FEMINA annotated beside them. As gatekeepers of the past ordered books to be burned, artworks to be destroyed, and new versions of myths, legends and historical documents to be produced, our view of history has been manipulated. Only now, through a careful examination of the artifacts, writings and possessions they left behind, are the influential and multifaceted lives of women emerging. Femina goes beyond the official records to uncover the true impact of women, such as: - Jadwiga, the only female king in Europe - Margery Kempe, who exploited her image and story to ensure her notoriety - Loftus Princess, whose existence gives us clues about the beginnings of Christianity in England In Femina, Ramirez invites us to see the medieval world with fresh eyes and discover why these remarkable women were removed from our collective memories.… (mais)
Membro:alisonfrances
Título:Femina: The instant Sunday Times bestseller – A New History of the Middle Ages, Through the Women Written Out of It
Autores:Janina Ramirez (Autor)
Informação:WH Allen (2023), Edition: 1, 464 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Lendo atualmente
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Femina: A New History of the Middle Ages, Through the Women Written Out of It de Janina Ramirez

Adicionado recentemente porcalvson, ATimlin, biblioteca privada, BroraRuth, TreeDC, Michela1977, sirens_and_warnings, Gmat.middleton
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Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A fantastic read!

I can't sing the praises of this book enough. I've always enjoyed reading about history. Consequently, I already knew versions of the History told by much of the earlier chapters of the book. But what this book did fantastically is to reinforce and give voice to the women who were there all along, tucked behind the narratives that have taken hold over time (as well as all the people who put so much effort and time to discover those voices)

A fantastic example (I've set this as a spoiler, but it consists of me telling the version of History I knew, and praising the book for expanding it in ways I never knew) is the telling of the story of the conversion of the Kentish people to Christianity. The basic version that I knew quite well can be summed up in this skit by my childhood favourite, Horrible Histories: https://youtu.be/MpWVj2ZCRKE?si=3WhrtxMdu6qoqPI7&t=125 (The Gist being St. Augustine came, convinced the king to convert, and he was readily accepting; the ease being explained by him having a wife that was Christian. This put the emphasis on St. Augustine and King Aethelbert, leaving his wife unnamed and as an afterthought) Through The author's efforts, it felt like Queen Bertha's voice was near enough put to paper. Her efforts, sacrifices and achievements taking centre stage, I now have a much deeper understanding and appreciation for this part of history, and for her as a critical person in the History of English Christianity. (And that of her family as well!)

I cannot recommend this book enough, especially if you already know about this period of history to some degree. (Though I only had a bit of knowledge on the Anglo-Saxon period and thoroughly enjoyed learning about all the other periods of history included!)

This book was sold to me as an informative book about important historical women, and in fact was so much more. The Author showed what is becoming possible with modern techniques of analysing the past and has left me so excited to see and hear the voices of the past continue to be rediscovered! ( )
  TreeDC | Jul 6, 2024 |
I'm coming to realize I am not the audience for these books, as much as I whine and cry and try to make them be.

Femina is not so much a "new" history of medieval women's lives as it is a series of nine biographies of exceptional women who lived in the European Middle Ages. There are much fuller negative reviews on this that I recommend perusing, but broadly speaking, this book offers nothing new to readers familiar with the period. The author's thesis is the laziest of pop-feminist history: "Did you know... Women did stuff back then?" Anyone who seriously believes women did nothing exceptional for a thousand years is so far gone, maybe it's a blessing that this book exists.

Anyway, this book reminded me of everything I hate about the current trend of popular feminist frameworks of texts. Femina reminded me of the let-down that was The Once and Future Sex: Going Medieval on Women's Roles in Society—A pop-history book promising to elucidate the reader on something much larger, complicated, and nuanced than the author is either able or willing to do. I always find it funny that the authors of books like this remind the reader over and over again how rich the tapestry of time is but cannot seem to go deeper than the surface-level critique their advertising promises. When will they truly take to heart that history cannot be boiled down to pithy feminist takes? When will (usually female) social historians give their readers something to really chew on? Why do I feel like women's-interest history always believe their readers are complete fucking dolts?

To summarize, I don't think it's possible to extract more than Ramírez simple thesis when you look at only nine people, and nine very, very wealthy and powerful people at that. It's interesting, sure, and these women absolutely deserve to be in the casual historical canon as the author argues, but... It is in no way a "new history," you know? That would entail much, much more than Ramírez is willing to put in.

Well... The book obviously strikes a cord though: look at those high reviews! I would only recommend this to people who know close to nothing on this period, and obviously only as a supplement to a more historiographical sound or primary source texts. I'm just annoyed at sexism and its over-production of limp-wristed non-fiction texts.

On to new pop history I will inevitably hate... ( )
  Eavans | Jan 29, 2024 |
I loved this as the author was excited about new discoveries still taking place which brought new info to life, and so it was fascinating to learn more about specific women during this period and how they lived. ( )
  spinsterrevival | Aug 18, 2023 |
There is a quote part-way through this book about the voices of the women of the Middle Ages, that they have either been lost or they are reflected in the views of the men around them. In this book Janina Ramirez tries to give voice to some of the key female players. They are not necessarily the most obvious but they highlight key roles and developments.
Ramirez writes with a true passion and her words sparkle. It is an incredibly well-researched book but that does not get in the way of the stories and that is what works so well. There are tales of women I was aware of and others I wasn't, also the roles of women in certain periods eg the Cathars. I really loved this book ( )
  pluckedhighbrow | Aug 23, 2022 |
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Ramirez, Janinaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Molegraaf, MarioTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Smith, AndrewDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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A groundbreaking reappraisal of medieval femininity, revealing why women have been written out of history and why it matters. The Middle Ages are seen as a bloodthirsty time of Vikings, saints and kings: a patriarchal society that oppressed and excluded women. But when we dig a little deeper into the truth, we can see that the "Dark" Ages were anything but. Oxford and BBC historian Janina Ramirez has uncovered countless influential women's names struck out of historical records, with the word FEMINA annotated beside them. As gatekeepers of the past ordered books to be burned, artworks to be destroyed, and new versions of myths, legends and historical documents to be produced, our view of history has been manipulated. Only now, through a careful examination of the artifacts, writings and possessions they left behind, are the influential and multifaceted lives of women emerging. Femina goes beyond the official records to uncover the true impact of women, such as: - Jadwiga, the only female king in Europe - Margery Kempe, who exploited her image and story to ensure her notoriety - Loftus Princess, whose existence gives us clues about the beginnings of Christianity in England In Femina, Ramirez invites us to see the medieval world with fresh eyes and discover why these remarkable women were removed from our collective memories.

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