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The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of…
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The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the… (original: 2007; edição: 2007)

de Norman Doidge

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2,551694,408 (4.2)53
A new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the old notion that the human brain is immutable. Psychoanalyst Doidge traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity and the people whose lives they've transformed--people whose mental limitations or brain damage were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:paperscratch
Título:The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (James H. Silberman Books)
Autores:Norman Doidge
Informação:Penguin (Non-Classics) (2007), Edition: 1 Reprint, Paperback, 448 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Brain That Changes Itself : Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science de Norman Doidge (2007)

  1. 00
    The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature de Steven Pinker (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: From Pinker’s Book:

    All this should be obvious, but nowadays any banality about learning can be dressed up in neurospeak and treated like a great revelation of science. According to a New York Times headline, “Talk therapy, a psychiatrist maintains, can alter the structure of the patient’s brain.” I should hope so, or else the psychiatrist would be defrauding her clients. “Environmental manipulation can change the way [a child’s] brain develops,” the pediatric neurologist Harry Chugani told the Boston Globe. “A child surrounded by aggression, violence, or inadequate stimulation will reflect these connections in the brain and behavior.” Well, yes; if the environment affects the child at all, it would do so by changing connections in the brain. A special issue of the journal Educational Technology and Society was intended “to examine the position that learning takes place in the brain of the learner, and that pedagogies and technologies should be designed and evaluated on the basis of the effect they have on student brains.” The guest editor (a biologist) did not say whether the alternative was that learning takes place in some other organ of the body like the pancreas or that it takes place in an immaterial soul. Even professors of neuroscience sometimes proclaim “discoveries” that would be news only to believers in a ghost in the machine: “Scientists have found that the brain is capable of altering its connections. . . . You have the ability to change the synaptic connections within the brain.” Good thing, because otherwise we would be permanent amnesiacs.

    This neuroscientist is an executive at a company that “uses brain research and technology to develop products intended to enhance human learning and performance,” one of many new companies with that aspiration. “The human being has unlimited creativity if focused and nurtured properly,” says a consultant who teaches clients to draw diagrams that “map their neural patterns.” “The older you get, the more connections and associations your brain should be making,” said a satisfied customer; “Therefore you should have more information stored in your brain. You just need to tap into it.” Many people have been convinced by the public pronouncements of neuroscience advocates—on the basis of no evidence whatsoever—that varying the route you take when driving home can stave off the effects of aging. And then there is the marketing genius who realized that blocks, balls, and other toys “provide visual and tactile stimulation” and “encourage movement and tracking,” part of a larger movement of “brain-based” childrearing and education…

    These companies tap into people’s belief in a ghost in the machine by implying that any form of learning that affects the brain (as opposed, presumably, to the kinds of learning that don’t affect the brain) is unexpectedly real or deep or powerful. But this is mistaken. All learning affects the brain. It is undeniably exciting when scientists make a discovery about how learning affects the brain, but that does not make the learning itself any more pervasive or profound.
    … (mais)
  2. 00
    The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: And Other Inspiring Stories of Pioneering Brain Transformation de Barbara Arrowsmith-Young (bernsad)
  3. 00
    Brain School: Stories of children with learning disabilities and attention disorders who changed their lives by improving their cognitive functioning de Howard Eaton (AmberA)
    AmberA: Howard Eaton's "Brain School" offers an in-depth look into the Arrowsmith Program (for students with learning disabilities) described in Chapter 2 of Norman Doidge's "The Brain That Changes Itself."
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» Veja também 53 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 69 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
awesome book, quick to read, fascinating ideas that really change how yu think about learning and thinking.
  royragsdale | Sep 22, 2021 |
Very interesting explanation of how much the brain changes, for good and bad. ( )
  atari_guy | May 11, 2021 |
Amazing book that really forces you to recognize the incredible opportunity we all have to shape the wiring in our own brains, as well as those around us. Hard to really take in the implications this new science can and will have on psychology and brain science moving forward. ( )
  porte01 | Jan 25, 2021 |
Book. RLS library gives away lots of books for political education. This book is missing a description. Write a description of about 150 words and you can take it or a random book home. OR, you can exchange 2 books for 3 random books of ours. ( )
  Rosaluxhanoi | Nov 2, 2020 |
Well, this will make you think....

This book is based on the author's experience, learning, understanding, research and pioneering that followed on from restoring normal life to his father after he had suffered a debilitating stroke.

He shifted that idea that this specific bit of our brain controls just this specific bit of our body or behaviour and instead revealed that it is both true and not true or maybe better said as true but not fixed.

He broke new ground in stroke treatment, for sure, but also broke new ground in how strokes are thought about both by medical and lay people.

I am so glad I read when I did because shortly afterwards I had a stroke!

I kid you not.

As an experience it was terrifying in ways that words cannot convey. But where this book came into my experience was that I knew that whatever loss I suffered in that stroke would probably not be permanent, which was what I had always assumed would be the case.

Being told that you have suffered a serious stroke is not the best news you can get but slowly getting back what you thought might be gone forever more than makes up for it. Knowing that recovery is both possible and likely really helps.

This was only a few months ago but today you'd never know that anything had happened to me. From the outside I look, move and talk like I always did. Inside I've lost a chunk of my vision and I may not drive again but things could have been much worse.

There's an old saying that goes, "Old people are not afraid to die, only of what may happen to them beforehand". If you have ageing parents, recommend they read this book, it not only takes a lot of the fear out of strokes but gives a realistic and positive view of the possible outcomes. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 69 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
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This book is about the revolutionary discovery that the human brain can change itself, as told through the stories of the scientists, doctors, and patients who have together brought about these astonishing transformations.
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A new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the old notion that the human brain is immutable. Psychoanalyst Doidge traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity and the people whose lives they've transformed--people whose mental limitations or brain damage were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.--From publisher description.

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