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The Madness of Crowds: A Novel (Chief…
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The Madness of Crowds: A Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novel, 17) (edição: 2021)

de Louise Penny (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5073337,529 (4.04)38
Membro:losethecovid
Título:The Madness of Crowds: A Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novel, 17)
Autores:Louise Penny (Autor)
Informação:Minotaur Books (2021), 448 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

The Madness of Crowds de Louise Penny

Adicionado recentemente porImLisaAnn, georgnbay, CDVicarage, armchairreader, HeathMochaFrost, Sarah1974, R_B, cjyap1, nettie195, biblioteca privada
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Mostrando 1-5 de 33 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Another great book, very timely as it is set as Three Pines gradually comes out of the pandemic. It is also timely in the topic. The Pandemic brought some ugliness out in people. Gamache is called upon to act as security for and upcoming talk, which is something he is not normally called to do. Upon investigating the speaker, it soon becomes clear she is a divisive figure. Calls for cancelling are denied and sure enough there is an incident. Add to this, a Noble Prize nominee is also visiting. While she's done great things, she is also a damaged person for her experiences. As suspicions grow, so do the stakes. ( )
  cjyap1 | Nov 21, 2021 |
I’ve long been a fan of Louise Penny’s series about Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. Satisfyingly, Penny is more than capable of writing thrilling mysteries but additionally she has never been shy to address the major topics of our time (this book being no exception…).

Then there is the almost mystical village of Three Pines in which most of the novels play out and which features some rather unique characters - from the gifted but struggling painter to the grumpy crazy poet, the “Asshole Saint” and everything in between.

These factors still make me look forward to each new novel. Even after 16 prior books!

»“And for your information,” she told Gabri when he’d shown up with gardening gloves and a trowel, “I like weed.” “Weeds, you mean,” he said. “Maybe,” said the old poet.«

In this seventeenth instalment Gamache investigates the attempted murder of professor Abigail Robinson and the murder of Robinson’s assistant, Debbie, on New Year’s Eve. In this book’s setting, the COVID-19 pandemic is, of course, mentioned (and actually features in a few details) but, thankfully, over. (And lest anyone worries: None of our friends have perished!)

Robinson promotes an agenda of mandatory euthanasia and eugenics and a friend of Gamache asks for him personally to protect the controversial professor during a speech.

Being the grandfather of Idola - the child of his second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir, and Gamache’s daughter - who has trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) and, first of all, a decent human being, Gamache is strongly opposed to Robinson’s inhuman agenda.

»It was Sunday afternoon. The next morning Armand Gamache had an appointment with the Premier of Québec. To show him the files. And to let him know, quietly, confidentially, that if there was any move to adopt mandatory euthanasia, or anything vaguely smelling of eugenics, those files would go public. It was, he knew, blackmail. But he and his conscience could live with that.«

Like a recurring theme or even a mantra Penny uses the phrase “Ça va bien aller.” or its English translation “It's going to be fine.” throughout the book even though this is not actually certain this time around.
Especially since a new side character, Haniya Daoud, who fled rape and torture in her native Sudan and went on to build a movement for social justice is introduced. At several important points in the book, Daoud - nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize - serves to add an additional point of view; and her views are often rather bleak...

In this novel I also first learnt about Canadian scientist-gone-torturer, Ewen Cameron, who actually managed to torture patients using, drugs, poisons (!) and electro shocks until as late as 1964 without their prior knowledge or consent.

So, there are, admittedly, a lot of issues that Penny is tackling in the aptly titled “The Madness of Crowds” but she does so extremely well and engagingly. As Penny mentions in her acknowledgements, she also reflects on “What happens to tip people over into madness?”.

To any current fan of this series, this instalment is highly recommended as we return from the rather mediocre “All the Devils Are Here” and Paris to where this series belongs.
Anyone who wants to get acquainted with the series should take a look at an earlier book, e. g. the excellent “How the Light Gets In”.

Five out of five stars!


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  philantrop | Nov 11, 2021 |
An overall pick for the moral/ethical questions raised and despite Penny making the mistake many of us have in thinking that the arrival of the vaccine(s) would lead swiftly to the end of the pandemic. I also think she puts too much emphasis on the lasting effects of pandemic isolation, or maybe it was just worse in Quebec. Or maybe it hit people harder who were used to interacting a lot more with a lot of people, and I'm missing that perspective. She assumes a collective experience that I don't really share, which makes it challenging to connect with the novel at some points. This isn't usually a problem for me with stories about less-current events, but it just feels sometimes like people are leaning a little too hard on the "isolation" piece being the root of so many problems rather than the hundreds of thousands of deaths and the revelation of our healthcare system and social safety net as the farce they are.

The mystery is fun, though. ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Nov 7, 2021 |
Getting ready to celebrate Christmas in Three Pines with his family, Gamache's holiday is interrupted by a request to provide security for a lecture by Professor Abigail Robinson who is promoting euthanasia for incapacitated elderly and children born with major medical issues. Gamache's infant grandson is mentally challenged and would fall into this professor's net.

The lecture draws angry folk from across Canada and is disrupted by what appears to be an attempted assassination of the professor Robinson. This followed a day later by the murder of Robinson's friend and assistant, Deborah. So many suspects that Gamache and his team spends a lot of time analyzing suspects which made this book seem much longer than it had to be.

Written during the Covid Pandemic, the story takes place after the Pandemic is over but its repercussions still influence the characters. The least satisfying novel in the series for this reader. ( )
  lamour | Nov 3, 2021 |
Penny taps into themes of a troubled era where pain, fear and quick fixes all storm together to create shocking solutions. The cast of well-loved characters is reassembled for a thrilling ride where ideology, passion and emotions collide.
Her craft pulls the novel through but it could definitely have been shortened. Also, her politically correct comments thrown throughout position Penny clearly in a certain political camp... while it didn't bother me, it didn't really help the story along either. This is definitely a book of its time.
Nonetheless, I enjoyed it and read it in a few days, engrossed by the plot and the well defined characters. ( )
  Cecilturtle | Oct 29, 2021 |
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This book is dedicated to all those on the front line
of the pandemic who have worked so hard, in often
impossible conditions, to keep the rest of us safe.
If
ca va bien aller, it's thanks to you.
Louise Penny, 2021
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