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Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest (2021)

de Suzanne Simard

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

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7822628,654 (4.03)38
Suzanne Simard is a pioneer on the frontier of plant communication and intelligence; her TED talks have been viewed by more than 10 million people worldwide. In this, her first book, now available in paperback, Simard brings us into her world, the intimate world of the trees, in which she brilliantly illuminates the fascinating and vital truths?that trees are not simply the source of timber or pulp, but are a complicated, interdependent circle of life; that forests are social, cooperative creatures connected through underground networks by which trees communicate their vitality and vulnerabilities with communal lives not that different from our own. Simard writes?in inspiring, illuminating, and accessible ways?how trees, living side by side for hundreds of years, have evolved, how they learn and adapt their behaviors, recognize neighbors, compete and cooperate with one another with sophistication, characteristics ascribed to human intelligence, traits that are the essence of civil societies?and at the center of it all, the Mother Trees: the mysterious, powerful forces that connect and sustain the others that surround them. And Simard writes of her own life, born and raised into a logging world in the rainforests of British Columbia, of her days as a child spent cataloging the trees from the forest and how she came to love and respect them. And as she writes of her scientific quest, she writes of her own journey, making us understand how deeply human scientific inquiry exists beyond data and technology, that it is about understanding who we are and our place in the world.… (mais)
  1. 20
    Underland: A Deep Time Journey de Robert Macfarlane (teelgee)
  2. 00
    Lab Girl de Hope Jahren (nancenwv)
    nancenwv: Beautiful descriptions of the functions and life of trees and plants alternates with her story of her growth as a research scientist. (non-fiction)
  3. 00
    The Language of Trees de Katie Holten (allthegoodbooks)
    allthegoodbooks: Similar theme - trees, in particular mother trees and their roles
  4. 00
    In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World de Lauren E. Oakes (GerrysBookshelf)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 26 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
My love of nature and curiosity of how nature works, attracted me to this book. I see trees as precious and majestic so I was excited to learn more about these amazing creatures. My husband is responsible for planting an endless amount of trees on our property, so I was interested to learn more about what we may be cultivating. Suzanne Simard’s book, Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest, was much more than I expected. Suzanne intelligently shares the science of how forests function, which she learned through extensive study and her own research. Her book also reads like a memoir, which really made me connect to her life-long work.

The book opens with Suzanne talking about her upbringing in which her family was involved in the logging business. I don’t know anyone who cuts down trees for a living, but I presumed such people didn’t care much about replanting trees or the damage this caused the environment. This presumption does not apply to the Simard family. Suzanne’s time spent cataloging trees instilled her appreciation for trees, and her attention to the forest in which the trees grew led her on an amazing scientific and personal journey. She helped me remember that we need to log trees for our sustainability, while also replanting trees for the sustainability of the forests. What we take, we must give back.

I loved the vulnerability Suzanne shared about her life. Her love for her work with trees and her personal life of family, marriage, and children are completely intertwined. She experienced devastating loss and amazing highs as she worked hard to change the minds of policy makers. The entire book is wonderful. My favorite part of course, is her discovery of the mother tree and how it correlated with her significant life events. Suzanne’s writing is emotional and powerful. This book left me feeling hopeful, sentimental, and proud for her and her life’s accomplishments.

I purchased the audiobook of Finding the Mother Tree from Audible. Narration by the author, Suzanne Simard, was perfect. A book this magnificent can only be read by the author.

I have photos and additional information that I'm unable to include here. It can all be found on my blog, in the link below.
A Book And A Dog ( )
  NatalieRiley | May 23, 2024 |
Some day I hope forest ecologist Suzanne Simard runs into botanist Hope Jahren. These women have a lot in common.

They share an unceasing curiosity and respect for the living world. They sacrificed a lot to become scientists. They experienced the loneliness and frustrations of being female scientists, and they made significant contributions to knowledge, although Simard’s discoveries may ultimately prove to be much, much bigger.

Simard’s scientific revelations include an understanding the role fungi root networks play in helping trees share nutrients under stressful conditions.

Foresters assumed that if you clearcut a forest it can be regenerated well enough by replanting new trees in their stead.

Simard showed why kindred species in forests — like the alder or birch in fir stands — should be left alone. Because trees cooperate even as they compete for light, water, and nutrients.

While Simard’s book is packed with elegant descriptions of the forests and mountain ranges she studies, in “Lab Girl” I think Jahren more keenly assays the mental landscape and why it is so hard to make a difference.

And Jahren is funny where Simard is sober, well, most of the time.

In this book in addition to her science Simard shares her personal evolution as a woman, mother, and to a minor degree as a lover.

Her youth was stained by the volatile marriage of her parents and their ultimate divorce. Her own marriage goes off the rails when her academic ambitions and her husband’s preference to live in the backwoods clash.

In this telling her personal enlightenment is gruesomely hijacked by a painful and frightening bout of breast cancer, culminating in surgery and chemotherapy.

As in her childhood, during this period the forests and to a lesser extent her lab help restore her balance. She loses her brother to a terrible farm accident before she has a chance to reconcile with him after a drunken argument. But nothing prepares her for the disorientation that accompanies the cancer treatments.

I have a few complaints with the book.

Simard sets up a parallels between her own suffering and the plunder of the beautiful BC forests, between the role “mother trees” and the mothering role in her life, and between the sacredness of nature’s family and the family she misses from her childhood. Her children are like her little sprouts.

Can’t fathers be nurturing, too?

I can certainly identify with the sense of loss as we grow older and our families fragment.

She also lets herself be consumed by nostalgia for the good old days when the forests were managed by First Nations. Contemporary paleontology shows that hunter-gatherers were terraformers, too, if not quite as dramatic as our civilization turned out to be.

Simard gives long and lavish descriptions of her forest haunts. Sometimes I wished she’d cool it with the adjectives. I’ve been to forests, too. And sometimes they are just plain monotonous.

The sidebars give this story a messianic and melodramatic tinge. I find the science and the trail of discovery plenty exciting enough.

And I should thank both Simard and Jahren for insisting that I focus more closely on the micro aspects of nature. It is more beautiful and complex than imaginable. ( )
  MylesKesten | Jan 23, 2024 |
Perhaps my expectations were too high, but I didn't find this book as satisfying as I had hoped. Through other popular science texts, I had already become familiar with most of Dr. Simard's groundbreaking and important findings. (What this book does deliver well are detailed descriptions of many of the experiments she conducted to reach them.) Much of the biographical material was handled unevenly, in my opinion. If it's the botanical and ecological science you want, perhaps some other books might serve you better. ( )
  Treebeard_404 | Jan 23, 2024 |
Well written. Weaves between her life and her science: the life of trees. Surprisingly successful, just barely goes to treacle-y but not by much. It’s a moving account of the science behind proving life is inexorably connected.
  BookyMaven | Dec 6, 2023 |
50. Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest by Suzanne Simard
published: 2021
format: 347-page Kindle ebook
acquired: September 5 read: Sep 5 – Oct 24 time reading: 13:35, 2.3 mpp
rating: 4
genre/style: science theme: none
locations: British Colombia and Oregon
about the author: a Canadian scientist who is a professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia, born in the Monashee Mountains of British Columbia.

A memoir with a lot of real science - with pioneering research tracing nutrient sharing between different and competitive tree species, creating a kind of symbiosis through specialized fungi, and later on how old large “mother” trees support their own young. A theme here is everything is connected and we to manage climate change with this knowledge.

Simard tells in the introduction that she discovered the nature of this fungal connections, which I thought was too bold, except that it's exactly what she did. Her 1990's PhD was published on the cover of Nature magazine, under the headline Wood Wide Web. It was really groundbreaking.

I read this with a new group on Litsy focused on nature writing. Some of the members had discomfort with so much memoir in the book, and with the writing, which was actually very good, feels very honest, but is not a work of literary craft.

Anyway, I really enjoyed this, and I really enjoyed being in this science mindset.

2022
https://www.librarything.com/topic/345047#7966562 ( )
  dchaikin | Oct 31, 2022 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Suzanne Simardautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Allie, ManfredTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Asensio Fernández, MontserratTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blair, KellyDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Colangelo, PaulArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kempf-Allié, GabrieleTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Knighton, Anna B.Designerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ram, TitiaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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But man is part of nature, and his war against nature is inevitably a war against himself. -- Rachel Carson
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For my daughters, Hannah and Nava
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For generations, my family has made its living cutting down forests.
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Suzanne Simard is a pioneer on the frontier of plant communication and intelligence; her TED talks have been viewed by more than 10 million people worldwide. In this, her first book, now available in paperback, Simard brings us into her world, the intimate world of the trees, in which she brilliantly illuminates the fascinating and vital truths?that trees are not simply the source of timber or pulp, but are a complicated, interdependent circle of life; that forests are social, cooperative creatures connected through underground networks by which trees communicate their vitality and vulnerabilities with communal lives not that different from our own. Simard writes?in inspiring, illuminating, and accessible ways?how trees, living side by side for hundreds of years, have evolved, how they learn and adapt their behaviors, recognize neighbors, compete and cooperate with one another with sophistication, characteristics ascribed to human intelligence, traits that are the essence of civil societies?and at the center of it all, the Mother Trees: the mysterious, powerful forces that connect and sustain the others that surround them. And Simard writes of her own life, born and raised into a logging world in the rainforests of British Columbia, of her days as a child spent cataloging the trees from the forest and how she came to love and respect them. And as she writes of her scientific quest, she writes of her own journey, making us understand how deeply human scientific inquiry exists beyond data and technology, that it is about understanding who we are and our place in the world.

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