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Klara and the Sun: A novel (Vintage…
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Klara and the Sun: A novel (Vintage International) (edição: 2022)

de Kazuo Ishiguro (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
4,8962362,263 (3.87)1 / 284
"From her place in the store that sells artificial friends, Klara--an artificial friend with outstanding observational qualities--watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass in the street outside. She remains hopeful a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change forever, Klara she is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans. In this luminous tale, Klara and the Sun, Nobel Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro looks at our rapidly changing modern world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator to explore a fundamental question: what does it mean to love?"--… (mais)
Membro:maitrigita
Título:Klara and the Sun: A novel (Vintage International)
Autores:Kazuo Ishiguro (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2022), 320 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:**
Etiquetas:read 2023, audio

Informações da Obra

Klara and the Sun de Kazuo Ishiguro

  1. 91
    Never Let Me Go de Kazuo Ishiguro (JGoto, kjuliff)
    JGoto: Style and themes are similar in both of these novels by Ishigura.
  2. 32
    Flowers for Algernon de Daniel Keyes (Othemts)
  3. 00
    The Mountain in the Sea de Ray Nayler (Usuário anônimo)
    Usuário anônimo: Another view of non-human intelligence
  4. 01
    Machines Like Me de Ian McEwan (JuliaMaria, kjuliff)
    JuliaMaria: Intelligente Roboter als Ersatz für menschliche Freundschaften und Liebe.
    kjuliff: SciFi and computers - possibility of them having souls.
  5. 01
    Automaton: Roman (German Edition) de Berit Glanz (JuliaMaria)
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Inglês (223)  Holandês (3)  Espanhol (2)  Dinamarquês (2)  Catalão (1)  Francês (1)  Alemão (1)  Todos os idiomas (233)
Mostrando 1-5 de 233 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
It means something when the most empathetic character is the non-human one. Klara, as an AF (artificial friend), is even more observant than most, and the lesson is pretty clear (almost from the outset) that if we humans don't observe, don't listen? Then we become rather incapable of empathy.
The book muses upon faith, hope, and love. Klara's faith in the sun is based in hope, but also pragmatic observation and an innocent sense of causation. Josie's mother is hopeful about love, yet lacks faith. Ricky, Josie's pragmatic and "unlifted" friend, perhaps has the strongest faith in Klara as he is able to assist her without really knowing why. Josie is the most human of characters in her determination and courage, but also in her code-switching and mercurial teenagery-ness. Josie's father is a skeptical engineer, but he too has to take a leap of faith in Klara, for the love of Josie.

Ishiguro does not give us all the details. The AFs get only a store as a backstory context. We know there are the lifted and the unlifted children, but we only see the ramifications of that status, not the details regarding how it happens. In this sense, Ricky is one of the most interesting characters in that he represents the folly of societal categories (one is reminded of Dr. Seuss's Sneetches with the stars, and those without stars), as he's clearly one of the most intelligent characters in the novel.

Another lesson from Klara --if only we were all be able to carry the images of our memories and recall them to inform our present understanding. We do, actually, of course, but Ishiguro paints the process slowly and truly through Klara, inviting us to think about our own intentionality and how often we dismiss or suppress our memories because we are not just mere data collectors, but data manipulators.

The ending pushed this away from five stars for me...it felt too much like a saccharine epilogue. We get an explanation of Klara's REAL lesson from the store manager and it all smacked a bit too much of a Care Bears animated special for my taste. I found myself frustrated that the manager herself doesn't get much of a backstory, but Ishiguro has a way of making you accept what he gives you, despite your own desires. In her New York Times Review in 2021, Radhika Jones gets it:

"'Still, when Klara says, "I have my memories to go through and place in the right order," it strikes the quintessential Ishiguro chord. So what if a machine says it? There's no narrative instinct more essential, or more human." ( )
  rebcamuse | Apr 21, 2024 |
Series Info/Source: This is a stand alone book. I borrowed this on audiobook from my library.

Thoughts: This was okay. I ended up finishing it but found this to have a very deliberate pace and be a bit boring. I also felt like the ending was unfinished and not as impactful as I had hoped. This is yet another story about an artificially intelligent robot that helps out humanity but is then forgotten.

The story follows Klara, an AF (Artificial Friend). Klara is purchased by Josie's family to be a companion to Josie. Josie is often sick and this puts a lot of stress on Josie and her mother. Klara helps in whatever way she can and for Klara that means petitioning the Sun for help with Josie's sickness. Klara is strangely insightful for an AF and her observations help her human family even more than they realize.

There were glimmers of intriguing things here. Like the possibility of this AF (artificial friend) completely replacing a human child, or Klara's mission to stop pollution. There are also glimmers of humanity being feed-up with the corporate, lifted culture. All of these ideas were glimpses and, unfortunately, they weren't fully developed.

A number of themes in this story are glimpsed by Klara but never explored or explained. For example, I never figured out what the idea of being "lifted" really was. I never really figured what it meant for Josie's father to be part of the splinter group he was part of. These intriguing issues are briefly glimpsed, never explained, and then forgotten. There wasn't any follow through. It left this feeling like a sketch of some unique ideas rather than a complete story.

I was hoping for some surprising end to this, something that would really make me think. However, the ending felt very tired and like a million other stories about artificial intelligence out there. I think the main difference in this story is how Klara deifies the Sun and how subtly Klara helps the family she is with via her unique insights.

I listened to this on audiobook and the audiobook was easy to listen to and well done.

My Summary (3/5): Overall this was okay but not great. I enjoyed Klara as a character but found a lot of the story felt more like a sketch than a fully developed story. The story feels unfinished and has very typical AI themes and ends in a very typical way for this type of sci-fi story. It is a very calm and deliberately paced story about an AI's faith and the way the AI uses that to help her people. If that sounds interesting to you I would recommend. If you are looking for a faster paced or ground-breaking sci-fi novel about AI I would look elsewhere. ( )
  krau0098 | Apr 11, 2024 |
Is marked as dystopia on story graph but this most definitely is not. Some horrific ideas but in the end the story of Klara and her relationship to the sun is beautiful and endearing ( )
  highlandcow | Mar 13, 2024 |
In some ways this storywas a combination of Puff the Magic Dragon and the dystopian world of Terminator where the machines have taken over. But the extent of the dystopia is never made clear. It is hinted at by the formation of defensive communities and the need for people to arm themselves against social breakdown. But I could not fully comprehend the full significance of the kindly Manager limping off at the scrap yard with her bag of trinkets. The failure of Klara to destroy the Cootings machines and the sacrifice that the attempt entailed raises more questions than answers – as does almost everything described in the world Ishiguro creates in this book.
But the compulsion to read on increased as the tale unfolded in unexpected directions. Even at the beginning when new models appeared in the show room, it was clear that things would not end well. I liked that Klara’s unfailing politeness and patience become character flaws in that they emphasise her lack if humanity.

Certainly, the use of a perceptive ingenue to show us human foibles is a well-used device, but many were the descriptions where I simply could not understand what was going on and why the humans were reacting the way Klara saw them. For this reason, I found the book enjoyable in its twists and turns and clever reversals but ultimately unsatisfactory.

I wonder what the risky practice of lifting involves?
( )
  simonpockley | Feb 25, 2024 |
Odd, it seems to me, that a perceptive humanoid robot capable of tutoring teenagers in advanced physics would sincerely view the sun as a Sun God, even if it is solar powered. I’m not too up on ancient Egyptian worship and beliefs surrounding Ra, but I’m guessing Klara’s religious beliefs (can a robot come to its own religious beliefs???) as described here are a melding of ancient Sun God worship and the modern belief in a personal, interventionist God who can be influenced through believers’ prayers:

I could understand that for all his kindness, the Sun was very busy; that there were many people besides Josie who required his attention; that even the Sun could be expected to miss individual cases like Josie, especially if she appeared well looked after by a mother, a housekeeper and an AF. The idea came into my mind, then, that for her to receive the Sun’s special help, it might be necessary to draw his attention to Josie’s situation in some particular and noticeable way.


Klara’s religious views - never described as religious as such but clearly they are a belief in the sun as a God which can be silently prayed to, bargained with, promises made to in exchange for special intervention, etc. - are the most interesting thing to me about this novel, which may be an uncommon take and not the main point of the thing, but nevertheless. Klara views the sun as an interventionist God she could pray to for help. That’s wild. There’s no hint that is in her programming. The understanding of advanced science she’s credited with didn’t stop her holding this view. Hmm.

Bill Gates wrote a post a couple of months ago about this book which included this musing: “In A Thousand Brains, Jeff Hawkins explores at length what moral obligation we have to our machines. Should we feel bad about pulling the plug on an artificial intelligence if it’s as human-like as Klara? Hawkins concludes that the answer is no. I agree with him, although I can imagine a future where other people might not.”

If our future humanoid robots are coming to religious beliefs on their own, then yeah, I’m thinking I wouldn’t be able to think of them just as machines (‘vacuum cleaners’ in a parallel a character in the novel makes) and not feel bad about pulling their plugs. There’s something just way too human about that. ( )
  lelandleslie | Feb 24, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 233 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
In de licht dystopische roman voert Ishiguro een balanseer act uit op de rand van kitch. Hij slaagt er echter op een uitzonderlijke wijze in om in evenwicht te blijven. Klara en de zon is een zeer geslaagde, enigszins verontrustende en gelaagde nieuwe roman van de meesterverteller en Nobelprijswinnaar…lees verder>
 
Most of Ishiguro’s novels are slender books that are more complicated than they at first seem; Klara and the Sun is by contrast more simple than it seems, less novel than parable. Though much is familiar here—the restrained language, the under-stated first-person narration—the new book is much more overt than its predecessors about its concerns.... Ishiguro is unsentimental—indeed, one of the prevailing criticisms of him is that he’s too cold, his novels overly designed, his language detached. (Some of the worst writing on Ishiguro ascribes this to his being Japanese, overlooking that he’s lived in England since he was a small child.) In most hands, this business of the mother-figure who sacrifices all for a child would be mawkish. Here it barely seems like metaphor. Every parent has at times felt like an automaton. Every parent has pleaded with some deity for the safety of their child. Every parent is aware of their own, inevitable obsolescence. And no child can offer more than Josie’s glib goodbye, though perhaps Ishiguro wants to; the book is dedicated to his mother.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe New Republic, Rumaan Alam (Apr 11, 2021)
 
It explores many of the subjects that fill our news feeds, from artificial intelligence to meritocracy. Yet its real political power lies not in these topical references but in its quietly eviscerating treatment of love. Through Klara, Josie, and Chrissie, Ishiguro shows how care is often intertwined with exploitation, how love is often grounded in selfishness ... this book focuses on those we exploit primarily for emotional labor and care work—a timely commentary during a pandemic in which the essential workers who care for us are too often treated as disposable ... If Never Let Me Go demonstrates how easily we can exploit those we never have to see, Klara and the Sun shows how easily we can exploit even those we claim to love ... a story as much about our own world as about any imagined future, and it reminds us that violence and dehumanization can also come wrapped in the guise of love.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe Nation, Katie Fitzpatrick (Mar 24, 2021)
 
... the real power of this novel: Ishiguro’s ability to embrace a whole web of moral concerns about how we navigate technological advancements, environmental degradation and economic challenges even while dealing with the unalterable fact that we still die.... tales of sensitive robots determined to help us survive our self-destructive impulses are not unknown in the canon of science fiction. But Ishiguro brings to this poignant subgenre a uniquely elegant style and flawless control of dramatic pacing. In his telling, Klara’s self-abnegation feels both ennobling and tragic.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe Washington Post, Ron Charles (Mar 2, 2021)
 
Critics often note Ishiguro’s use of dramatic irony, which allows readers to know more than his characters do. And it can seem as if his narrators fail to grasp the enormity of the injustices whose details they so meticulously describe. But I don’t believe that his characters suffer from limited consciousness. I think they have dignity. Confronted by a complete indifference to their humanity, they choose stoicism over complaint. We think we grieve for them more than they grieve for themselves, but more heartbreaking is the possibility that they’re not sure we differ enough from their overlords to understand their true sorrow. And maybe we don’t, and maybe we can’t. Maybe that’s the real irony, the way Ishiguro sticks in the shiv.... In Klara and the Sun, Ishiguro leaves us suspended over a rift in the presumptive order of things. Whose consciousness is limited, ours or a machine’s? Whose love is more true? If we ever do give robots the power to feel the beauty and anguish of the world we bring them into, will they murder us for it or lead us toward the light?
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe Atlantic, Judith Shulevitz (Mar 2, 2021)
 

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Kazuo Ishiguroautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Siu, SuraNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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In memory of my mother
Shizuko Ishiguro
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We're both of us sentimental. We can't help it. Our generation still carry the old feelings. A part of us refuses to let go. The part that wants to keep believing there's something unreachable inside each of us. Something that's unique and won't transfer. But there's nothig like that, we know that now. (68%)
Mr Capaldi believed there was nothing special inside Josie that couldn’t be continued. He told the Mother he’d searched and searched and found nothing like that. But I believe now he was searching in the wrong place. There was something very special, but it wasn’t inside Josie. It was inside those who loved her. (98%)
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"From her place in the store that sells artificial friends, Klara--an artificial friend with outstanding observational qualities--watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass in the street outside. She remains hopeful a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change forever, Klara she is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans. In this luminous tale, Klara and the Sun, Nobel Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro looks at our rapidly changing modern world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator to explore a fundamental question: what does it mean to love?"--

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