Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians: A…
Carregando...

A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians: A Novel (The Shadow Histories,… (edição: 2021)

de H. G. Parry (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1716124,107 (3.89)8
"A sweeping tale of revolution and wonder in a world not quite like our own. It is the Age of Enlightenment -- of new and magical political movements, from the necromancer Robespierre calling for revolution in France to the weather mage Toussaint L'Ouverture leading the slaves of Haiti in their fight for freedom, to the bold new Prime Minister William Pitt weighing the legalization of magic amongst commoners in Britain and abolition throughout its colonies overseas. But amidst all of the upheaval of the early modern world, there is an unknown force inciting all of human civilization into violent conflict. And it will require the combined efforts of revolutionaries, magicians, and abolitionists to unmask this hidden enemy before the whole world falls to darkness and chaos"--… (mais)
Membro:Raisa1973
Título:A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians: A Novel (The Shadow Histories, 1)
Autores:H. G. Parry (Autor)
Informação:Redhook (2021), 560 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians de H. G. Parry

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 8 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I've read a lot of books about the French Revolution and am generally more sympathetic to the revolution than not, but this was the first book that ever made me feel sorry for Robespierre. ( )
  Unreachableshelf | Apr 4, 2021 |
Well, this one was a tough one to rate. I had trouble getting into this book so I read it in spurts. Chunk reading is great if you find the material interesting but when you're struggling to stay awake, it's hard to retain the details.

A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians felt like it could be a few books that were squished together to approximate the shape of a cohesive story. One "book" was about the aspects of Revolution and the subsequent difficulties regarding drafting and implementing a Constitution (including Magical rights and Slavery Trade rights) in differing countries. The second "book" was about the abolition of Slavery and all the barbaric, abhorant (physical and magical) practices that go hand in hand with that Trade. The third "book" was about the actual Magic. Who should have the rights to use it especially with social class distinctions? What was said magic allowed to be used for? AND, this third aspect of the book followed the Dark magic (shadow Magic and Necromancy). Who was orchestrating the creation of the malevolent shadows and to what end? All three "books" felt like they were barely tethered together and the result was a book that didn't quite know what it wants to be when it grows up. The technical aspects were all there. The writing was done well. The World Developement was rich and the Characters were likeable. I would have liked it more if the characters were more dimensional and if the different storylines gelled better.

Overall:

This Alt-Historical Fantasy felt period appropriate. The wording and ambience did manage to give off Revolutionary hues. You could feel the desperation, the repression, the injustice, the grit and the will to fight for better/ freer lives.

The premise was extremely promising but the product fell short for me. BUT if bland (too harsh?!?) Revolutionary, Alt- History, Magical Realism is your thing then you might want to give this one a go. I thought it would be a nice change from the pure Fantasy I have been submerged in lately but unfortunately it wasn't for me.

*** I was given a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review *** ( )
1 vote BethYacoub | Sep 9, 2020 |
Set against the backdrop of the French Revolution, or to be precise, the Age of Enlightenment (1979-1994), 'A Declaration of the Rights of Magicians' is a sweeping, epic tale dripping with politics, history, magic, pain and darkness.

It is set in an alternate history where magic exists but is very strictly controlled, where people are allowed to use magic only for their self defense. Slavery exists and the slaves are spellbound, which means they are compelled to do any job that their masters want and their bodies move automatically to the orders given to them.

One such slave is Fina, who was plucked from her home and family and thrown into the horror of slavery. Many things were snatched from her but her strong magic wasn't one of those things because her magic was just too powerful to do so. So, one ordinary night, when she hears a voice inside her head to rise to the rebellion, she sets on a journey to achieve freedom for all the slaves, using her powers.

France is in the middle of a revolution to achievement their motto of Liberté, égalité, fraternité. But as the revolution continues, it unveils a France that people had only seen in their worst nightmares.

In England, Prime Minister William Pitt is trying his best to legalize magic among commoners and abolish slave trade. But the situation in France and Saint Dominigue makes it not only harder, but almost impossible to pass these laws in the House of Commoners.

What I really liked about this book was that this book is a perfect blend of history and magic, that is, the book included real-life characters and instances but still magic was a very important element to the plot. Also, I highly appreciate the level of research that the author had done before writing this novel which is highly evident in the novel. The setting of the novel alternates between London, France and the Carribean islands. The words were crafted in such a manner that the reader would be able to feel for each and every character.

What I didn't like about this book is that it is really long (544 pages) and some parts felt downright boring and stretched on. I really wish it was edited to be shortened as it took me eons to finally finish reading this book. Also, there instances where I had no idea what was going on.

I recommend this book to history geeks (being a geek is a good thing) and politics lovers.

I thank Orbit books and NetGalley for giving me this wonderful opportunity. ( )
1 vote Yogaalakshmi | Sep 2, 2020 |
I both learned a lot about the French Revolution after reading this book and wish I'd already known more about the French Revolution before reading this book. I did a lot of wikipedia-ing whenever new characters popped up. This was an interesting look at how things would have gone down with magic in the mix. Basically exactly the same, but with magic. ( )
  katebrarian | Aug 24, 2020 |
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: this was 100% a “me” book. It’s historical fantasy that sticks very close to reality, and which raises questions of ethics and morality and long-term outcomes. It has smart, optimistic characters who form strong platonic bonds with each other and spend their downtime being nerds. It’s a story about hope and empowerment and good intentions, and the magic is both glorious and unnerving. Everything’s just so and good becomes bad becomes good on a hair.

I was blown away by the historical underpinnings of this book. I only know the bare bones of the events of this era, and a handful of the names, but it’s clear that Parry’s sticking to actual timelines, actual personalities, and at least the major events like the storming of the Bastille and the Haitian Rebellion. To be able to stay that close to reality while crafting a multiple close-POV novel and rewriting history to have a key point of rebellion be legalizing lower-class magic is impressive, to say the least. And then to dramatise the events so you’re swept up in the emotions of them….

My next favourite thing was how cozy so much of this book felt. As I said, there are strong friendships between both Pitt and Wilberforce, and Robespierre and Desmoulins, and a lot of the plot is not action, not adventure, but people in sitting rooms planning for a better future while making in-jokes, or standing up in Parliament trying to push forward incremental changes. It’s gentle and drifts in unexpected directions, but there’s a lovely dark undercurrent of knowing that everyone’s going to either see their hopes dashed or succeed in the worst possible way. (That’s not really a spoiler. After all, the Reign of Terror happened.)

And that’s the third thing I liked, the way Parry steadily builds up the tension and can turn from hope, beauty, and emotional highs to despair, horror, and mental screaming in the space of a paragraph. Often for the same event from different points of view, or a fact or character being shown in new context. This is an emotional roller coaster on par with the Daevabad trilogy and I’m okay with that.

Do I have a least favourite thing? Besides how this story isn’t over and I don’t know when the next book is coming? I’m not sure. Maybe the gentle parts went on too long in a couple places. Maybe some of the scenes didn’t flow as well into each others as they might have. Small things, anyway. Things that haven’t stuck two months later.

So yeah, I really liked this book! It does everything I want in a novel—great character, world, plot, twists, writing—and it entertains while doing so. Oh, and I found myself googling the historical figures afterwards to learn more, which is not something that happens often. I’m not sure it’s going to stand the test of time, not like some fantasies I’ve read, but that doesn’t mean I don’t think it’s excellent and more people need to read it.

To bear in mind: A good chunk of the book is devoted to the French Reign of Terror, which means a lot of people are brutally executed by a totalitarian state on the page. Another POV involves an enslaved woman on a plantation, which isn’t as graphically depicted but is still awful.

8.5/10 ( )
  NinjaMuse | Aug 20, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
They came the summer she was six.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"A sweeping tale of revolution and wonder in a world not quite like our own. It is the Age of Enlightenment -- of new and magical political movements, from the necromancer Robespierre calling for revolution in France to the weather mage Toussaint L'Ouverture leading the slaves of Haiti in their fight for freedom, to the bold new Prime Minister William Pitt weighing the legalization of magic amongst commoners in Britain and abolition throughout its colonies overseas. But amidst all of the upheaval of the early modern world, there is an unknown force inciting all of human civilization into violent conflict. And it will require the combined efforts of revolutionaries, magicians, and abolitionists to unmask this hidden enemy before the whole world falls to darkness and chaos"--

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.89)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 3
3 4
3.5
4 5
4.5 1
5 6

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,465,671 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível